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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, October 29, 1918, Image 1

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MO SCOW, LATAH CQUNTJ, IDAHO TUSEDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1918
NUMBER 2T
VOLUME VIII
TURKEY ALSO ASKS FOR SEPARATE PEACE
Turkey, following the lead of Bulgaria and Austria, asks a separate peace
and she wants it in a hurry. There is no foolishness about Turkey's request
Thanksgiving will soon be here and the bird wants to get under cover.
Austria's appeal for peace and promise of reformation of government,
seems to be genuine. The emperor's brother has been given the task of
forming a separate government for Hungary.
Germany promises more reforms but continues a bitter fight to hold the
territory she stole from Belgium and France, but is being slowly driven
back to her own borders.
While the diplomatic notes are being exchanged the soldiers of the allied
armies are being hurled at the tottering central powers which are given
no rest. Austria is being fiercely hammered and great advances are being
made against her by the British, French and Italian forces. Austria must
have peace soon if she Ejgves any of her empire.
The telegraphic and cable dispatches received today follow:
Turkey Wants Separate Peace and Wants it Quick.
LONDON.—Turkey has independently presented peace proposals to the
entente nations according to a Constantinople dispatch. The report was
forwarded here from Copenhagen. Negotiations are expected to end soon,
it is added.
Allies Deal Austria Smashing Blow.
WITH THE ALLIED FORCES ON THE PIAVE RIVER.—(By Assbciated
Press.)—The last lines of Austro Hungarian resistance on the central por
tions along the Piave river have been broken by British, French and Italians.
The Austrians were dealt a smashing blow. It resulted in the allies mak
ing new advances and pushing forward as far as Vayolla, which was taken
by the victorious Italians, notwithstanding desperate resistance.
King Victor Emanuel saw the allied soldiers make the difficult crossings
of the Piave river. He was dressed as usual in a uniform made of the
same material as that of private soldiers. The king was under the Austrian
fire.
- *
General Debeny Defeating Germans.
PARIS.—(Official.)—General Debeney's first army continues to close in
on Guise and has captured the German first line trenches and barracks and
hospital south of the chateau, in Guise.
South of Guise the French have passed beyond the Louvry farm and also
continue to progress on the right bank of the Peron river.
Americans Took Prisoners Monday.
WASHINGTON.—Continued aviation activity in front of the first Ameri
can army in spite of unfavorable weather conditions reported by General
Pershing in Monday's communique.
Three enemy airplanes and observation balloons shot down by American
machines, all of which returned. Heavy artillery fire marked the day on
both sides of the Meuse. In Woevre prisoners were captured in a successful
raid. \
Quiet Today on American Front.
WITH THE AMERICAN FORCES NORTHWEST OF VERDUN.—(By
Associated Press.)—Artillery bombardment and machine gun fire reached
great intensity during the night. The fire was especially intense in Belleau
and Ormont woods. Activity died down on the Meuse. There is no important
action of any kind this morning.
\
German Constitution Amended.
COPENHAGEN.—The German federal council has approved the bill
amending the imperial constitution reforms adopted by the reichstag, says
a Berlin telegram.
*v&
British Front Quiet Last Night.
LONDON.—(Official.)—Artillery duels and patrol encounters are the only
activity on the British front last night.
Huns Start On American Early Today.
WITH THE AMERICAN ARMY NORTHWEST OF VERDUN.—(By As
sociated Press.—Activities along the center of the American front began long
before daylight this morning with furious bombardment.
The enemy opened a heavy fire with gas shells at 2:30 which was changed
to high explosive shells between 4 and 6.
American artillery responded. American patrols were active in Banthville
wood last night.
Americans on Italian Front.
ITALIAN HEADQUARTERS ON THE PIAVE.— (By Associated Press.)—
American soldiers are in the reserves along the Piave river fighting zone.
The correspondent saw an American battalion going through the "setting
up" exercises near the Piave river.
Hungary to be Independent State.
COPENHAGEN.—Archduke Joseph has issued a proclamation stating that
Emperor Charles has charged him with securing the complete independence
of Hungary.
Austrian Peace Note Has Arrived.
»WASHINGTON.—The new Austrian peace note asking an armistice and
peace for Austria, has been received by the Swedish legation for dèlivery to
the state department.
Italians Fight While Austria Pleads.
ROME.—(Official.)—The great battle began last Sunday on the Piave
river is continuing victoriously. The Italians stormed Dobbiadende heights
and also took other heights. The French troops, fighting with the Italians
on this front, took Mont Pionat and over 4000 prisoners have been counted.
Bitter Fighting Today in Belgium.
WITH THE BRITISH ARMIES IN FRANCE AND BELGIUM.—(By As
sociated Press.)—Bitter fighting took place today near Mont Thouy wood,
northwest of Famars and south of Valenciennes. The Germans % counter
attacked the British in the woods and the forest is now held by both British
and Germans.
Again American Casualties Are Light.
American casualties as reported today are only 650, which is the lightest
for many days. The list Issued for morning papers contains 400 names.
It follows:
Wounded severely, 66; killed in action, 42; died of wounds, 38; died of
accident and other causes, 6; died from aeroplane accident, 4; died of disease,
71; wounded, degree undetermined, 112; wounded slightly, 26; missing in
action, 34; prisoners, 2; total, 400.
Afternoon List.—Killed in action, 12; died from wounds, 5; died of accident,
1; died of disease, 21; wounded severely, 83; wounded, degree undetermined,
33; slightly wounded, 14; missing in action, 31; total, 150.
FORMER EDITOR OE
MIRROR IS DEAD
ELMER E. JOLLY, WELL KNOWN
NEWSPAPER MAN ANSWERS
THE LAST CALL
Elmer E. Jojly, a pioneer newspaper
man of Moscow and formerly editor of
the Moscow Mirror, died at Klamath
Falls, Oregon, Saturday. Word to that
effect reached Moscow today.
Mr. Jolly was a bright newspaper man
and made of the Moscow Mirror one of
the leading papers of northern Io< ho.
He left here 13 years ago for Seattle,
where he engaged in handling timber
He had been in ill health for
He went to Bend.
lands.
nearly two years.
Crescent and Klamath Falls, Oregon, in
hopes of securing relief.
Mr. Jolly leaves a widow, two daugh
ters, aged 11 and 16 years; his mother,
Mrs. A. M. Jolly, of Crescent, Oregon,
j and two brothers, Thomas H. of Cres
] cent, Oregon, and James D., of Seattle.
VOTERS SHOULD STUDY THE
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS
There are five constitutional amend
ments to be voted on at the election in
Idaho next Tuesday, November 5. These
are important items. The first is the
question of calling a constitutional con
vention to revise the constitution. The
second provides for counties, cities and
towns to assist fair not operated for a
profit. The third provides for abolish
ing the office of state school superin
tendent. The fourth limits bonded'in
debtedness and the fifth provides that a
cooperative association shall not be gov
erned by the same provisions as an in
corporated company,
should study these and should also study
the ballot. The democratic and repub
lican central committees have had many
sample ballots printed and these can be
had by applying to the central commit
tee headquarters.
Every voter
CASES
I
TODAY-NINE ARE RELEASED
I
LATAH COUNTY MEN CALLED
FOR PHYSICAL EXAMINA
TION THIS WEEK
The Latah county draft board has
called 60 more men to take the physi
cal examination and these are or
dered to report tomorrow and Thurs
day at the federal building. The lists
of those called follow:
List to Report Oct. 30.
John Albert Halseth, Kendrick.
Lester Delos Crocker, Kendrick.
Milburn Kenworthy, Moscow.
Rudolph P. Schultz, Deary.
Harry Albertson, Bovill.
Mark A. Rosenstein, Genesee.
Robt. A. Schussman, Garfield, Wn.
Oscar W. Kellberg, Troy.
Carl B. Gustafson, Deary.
Johji Lloyd Kamm, Palouse, Wn.
John Emang, Genesee.
Mathias W. Wahl, Genesee.
Oscar Halen, Deary.
Robt. George Ferguson, Troy.
Wayne Keeney, Potlatch.
John C. McPhee, Linden.
Lars Johan Liberg, Genesee.
Nestor Olson, Deary.
George F.' Scharnhorst, Genesee.
David Burklund, Troy.
Jordan A. Olson, Bovill.
Carl Henry Flomer, Genesee.
Julius G. Richtsmeir, Moscow.
Lee Burden, Potlatch.
Alfred Gilbertson, Genesee.
Edward A. Burke, Moscow.
Fred William Comnick, Genesee.
Henning Johnson, Troy.
Floyd Dewey Olson, Troy.
Floyd Charles Olson, Moscow.
Loyd William Baker, Deary.
John Williams, Juliaetta.
Browning Warren, Moscow.
List to Report Oct. 31.
James B. Taylor, Droxford, Sask.
Max W. Griffith, Moscow.
Joseph Silas Daniels, Moscow.
T)avid Lewis Walker, Palouse, Wn.
Mason H. Cornwall, Moscow.
John Yackley, Colton, Wn.
Herman T. Shodin, Troy.
Nelson Miles Gregory, Moscow.
Sever Nelson, Kendrick.
Nels Bakken, Moscow.
Lee Nelson, Genesee.
Frank J. Broemmeling, Genesee.
Leonard J. Ross, Princeton.
Oscar Marion Slind, Kendrick.
James Ira Michel, Farmington, Wn.
Edwin C. Babcock, Deary.
Fred John Florence, Kendrick.
Otto Walter Olson, Troy.
Raymond F. Warnecke, Moscow.
John Bysegger, Garfield, Wn.
Gustaf S. Nelson, Kendrick.
Melvin J. Hill, Moscow.
Herman Paulson, Troy.
Earl Albert Herman, Bovill.
Paul George Johnson, Troy.
Helmer Bernard Jorgensen, Deary.
Loren Richard Queener, Canada.
;
».
CALLED BY DEATH
WOMAN WELL KNOWN IN MOS
COW DIES AT ORANGEVILLE
AFTER LONG ILLNESS
Mrs.
Nona Bradbury, wife of County
Treasurer J. A. Bradbury, died this
afternoon at 5 o'clock following a
lingering illness extending over a
period of two years. Mrs. Bradbury
was born in Lewiston in 1879 and
spent her entire life in Lewiston and
Orangeville. She was a lady of many
fine qualities and enjoyed the high
est regard of a wide circle of friends.
Mrs. Bradbury is survived by her
husband, two sons, her parents, Mr.
and Mrs. I. C. Hattabaugh, and her
brother, Attorney M. R. Hattabaugh.
The funeral arrangements will not be
announced until tomorrow.
ORANGEVILLE, Oct. 28.
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There were six new cases of influ
enza admitted to the S. A. T. C. hos- |
pitals since yesterday's report and nine j
were released as out of danger. There
have l>een no further deaths. The situa
tion is regarded as greatly improved and
hopes are entertained that the disease
will steadily decline until it is eradicated
entirely.
There are two quite serious cases yet,
but both of these are expected to re
cover. All of the new cases are mild.
The vocational training men beg»sn
work in the big plant of the Idaho Na
tional Harvester works today, the first
time since they arrived here on October
15. 7 he health conditions required that
they be kept in the open air as much as
possible. They are now working and
seem to be enjoying the change from
"loafing."
There arc 300 men in the vocational
training school and 150 are in the auto
mechanical department and 150 are di
vided between general mechanics and
radio work. The foreman of each of
the shops of the Idaho National Har
vester company have been 1 retained as
instructors by the war department. The
men are taking to the work with a rel
ish and the instructors are well pleased
with the prospects of completing their
training in the limited time allowed, de
spite the fact that they lost nearly half
a month because of influenza.
Guy Curtis, Ed. Cruver and H. Potter,
heads of mechanical departments in the
harvester works, are retained as in
structors, but Mr. Cruver is laid up
with a mild attack of influenza.
Pullman Has Five Deaths.
Five more deaths are reported at Pull
man, making a total of 26, nearly all of
whom are members of the S. A. T. C.
Two died Sunday night and three more
last night, bringing the total for eight
days up to 26. The Pullman and W. S.
C. authorities think they have the epi
demic well in hand and look for a rapid
decline of the number of cases. Condi
tions have been bad in Pullman for more
than a week A Pullman woman said ;
"I can look out of my window almost
any hour and see the hearse going to or
returning from the cemetery or the dead
^agon going to or returning irom some
of the hospitals."
■m
TRANSITMEN, DRAFTSMEN AND
OTHERS WANTED FOR WORK
IN CANTONMENTS
Hundreds of transitmen, levelmen,
rodmen, chainmen and draftsmen
(salaries $1800 to $3000 per annum)
are urgently needed by the Construc
tion Division of the United States
Army for work on the three hundred
projects (costing $500,000,000 now
the course of construction.
These projects are camps, canton
ments, arsenals, wards, docks, great
port terminals, reserve stores, ware
houses, embarkation camps, engineer
ing camps, gunnery schools, housing,
lighterage, power plants, factories,
and additions to manufacturing plants,
gas and explosive plants.
To give some idea of the size of
these projects, the Construction Divi
sion of the Army advises that the
amount of lumber orderecf would cover
22,000 acres or 34 square miles; need
ing in addition 2,000,000 doors, 25,
000,000 pounds of nails, 12,000,000
square feet of glass, and 100,000,000
feet of roofing.
, __ mnnn _i,™_ „ _
JîJH " "o?n 000
employed on a single projec . >
workmen have been under the control
of the division at one time.
All qualified persons are urged to
make immediate inquiry relative to
the above mentioned positions at the
office of the District Secretary,
Eleventh U. S. Civil Service District,
303 Post Office Building, Seattle,
Washington. _
KENDRICK EDITOR
SPLENDID RECOUD OF HOMER E.
ESTES LAUDED BY RALPH
B. K NEPPER
The following editorials, taken from
the "Kendrick Gazette," and from the
pen of Ralph B. Knepper, who has al
ways been considered a loyal demo
crat at heart, but above all a true
American and willing to play fair
and give credit where same belongs,
shows the feeling among all patriots,
at this time, in regard to the untiring
work and efforts of Homer E. Estes
in connection with the war draft work
of the local board, as well as the en
viable record he has made for econ
omy and efficiency in connection
with his regular county work.
Mr. Estes has refused to leave his
regular routine of county and war
work for a moment, in connection
with his campaign jfor re-election,
and has felt that this is no time to
waste in discussing and advancing
his interests when the call for patri
otic work is so urgent, and has felt
perfectly content in leaving his can
didacy with the voters, and to accept
their verdict on the merits of his case.
Latah county has been noted all
over the state, as the best governed
and financed county in the state, and
Mr. Estes has been in a position to
play an important part in helping to
place the county in such an enviable
position financiall as compared to
her sister counties.
The Gazette editorials follow:
"It would be a fitting tribute to
the untiring efforts of Homer E.
Estes, who has carried such a heavy
burden of war work as secretary of
the Latah county draft board, to leave
blank on the democratic ticket, this
fall for the office of county auditor.
There is no particular reason why
anyone should aspire to this office
when it is now and has been for sev
eral terms, filled in such a satisfac
tory manner by the present incum
bent. Mr. Estes has spent weeks of
his time in the government service
for which he receives no compensa
tion. His work deserves recognition
by the citizens of the county."
_ "Homer Estes, Latah county's effi
cient county auditor, is so fully oc
cupied with his duties as secretary
the county draft board, that he
making no active campaign for the
November election. He will simply
have to rely upon his friends in the
county to look after his interests at
election time. The fact that he is
doing more war work than probably
any other one man in the county
should be remembered by the voters
when they go to the polls. We be
lieve that this fapt will be remembered
and feel confident that the same
overwhelming majority will be given
Mr. Estes that he has received in
the past. The fact that he has held
his office for a number of terms and
given such universal satisfaction is
the strongest argument that he should
be retained in the county's service."

_ , _
BOISE.—To the .Editor.—Dear Sir:
Your assistance is earnestly solicited
,m carrying to the men of Idaho en
gaged in the military service of the
country, information concerning their
right to vote although not actually
residing at their homes on election
da >'- The republican state central
committee is sending similar notices
t our b in kha ^ i rres pective of
their po] & cal aff nations,' in cases
w here the address is known; but as
there exists nowhere in the state a
complete roster of Idaho forces in the
various cantonments, we beg to avail
| ourselves of your publicity services to
| reach these patriotic absentees. Few
of the boys we take it, but receive
I copies of their home papers.
I . The substance of the law in ques
| tion is briefly as follows:
j Any qualified e'ector of the state
I of Idaho who is absent on election
j day from the election precinct in
i which he resides, who is duly register
I ed, may vote at such election. To
' qualify under the law application
must be made to the respective coun
ty auditors of the counties wherein
the elector resides for a blank appli
cation for an official ballot; upon re
ceipt of the same the absent elector
is required to fill out the blank places
and return according to instructions
printed on the back of the ballot.
Delay should be avoided as the com
plete ballot must be in the hands of
the auditors on or before Nov. 4th.
Y'ours respectfully,
DAVID BURRELL,
Vice Chairman.
IDAHO SOLDIERS
WON'T LOSE VOTE
LAW PROVIDES THAT ABSEN
TEES FROM HOME MAY VOTE
NEXT TUESDAY, NOV. 5
Pa.
FORMER FRENCH PREMIER
ON TRIAL FOR TREASON
j PARIS.—Sitting as a high court,
j the French senate began sittings to
| day for the trial of Former Premier
j Gaillaux, Deputy Louis Lastalot and
I Paul Gomby, charged with high
treason for the alleged effort to se
cure a separate peace with Germany.
NOW IN FRINGE
WRITES INTERESTINGLY TO HER
MOTHER OF STRANGE
THINGS SEEN THERE
Mrs. J. P>. Gilchrist is in receipt of
the following letter from her daughter,
Virgil Matthcr, who is now in France:
The letter follows :
"Sept. 4. 1918.
"Dear Mother: Here goes.the sixth
letter. Wonder how many you have
answered, for none of them have found
me yet. I wish you would number your
letters so I could tell if I get anywhere
near what you write.
"Well, I wish you could see me now.
You would smile if you could have been
at the end of the line, sure. Privas is a
place where the twentieth century has
met to mingle very slightly with the
fifteenth : for instance, there must be
half a dozen automobiles in the town
but the general beast of burden is the
ox or the burrow. An ideal place it
would he to come to visit, for it is a
wonderfully beautiful little village; old
as the hills and as slow as it is old.
"I am in sight of the Alphs, so you
may imagine we do not lack for beauty.
The country is rough and exceedingly
rocky. The great high hills rise in
picturesque loveliness all around the
town. When conditions is possible, we
see vineyards (full of great purple
grapes) or mullberry trees. These are
raised for the leaves, which are used
for the silk worms, for they make sillc
and wine here in this part of France.
"The streets in Privas are past de
scription; they ramble indefinitely up
and down, sometimes wide enough for
one on foot and sometimes as wide as
Third street. All the buildings are
stone ; they have stood here for cen
turies, so long that most of the stone
steps have deep depressions worn in
them. Really it is the oldest place I've
ever seen on our way down from Paris.
We stopped off for a day at Valence,
where I had to visit a dispensary which
a California doctor had installed and is
running at present. That town is an
other old-timer. Up above it on a high
bluff commanding a view of the whole
surrounding country is the ruins of an
old castle, built by the Romans and used
during the 10th century as a home for
robbers, as from it the robbers could
see the caravans on their way across
the country and would pounce down
on them killing and robbing their vic
tims. We visited an old church 900
years old ; wonderful old place with its
rare tapestries, paintings, statutes and
beautiful stained-glass windows. It
gives one a sense of awe to stand in
such an old place and think of the
shipped there.
"In Paris we attended church last
Sunday at the famous Noter Dame; it
is truly beautiful and is 750 years old
and filled with priceless art treasures.
It is just such old and wonderful things
as these churches that the Germans
seem particularly bent on destroying.
"Sunday p. m. Had a long walk this
morning and a corking good dinner.
Our eats are much better here than in
Paris. I do not know how long I will
be here.
"They tell me they have such cold
winters and so much snow; it is so high
up : guess that is why I am to establish
a dispensary and help care for- the
refugees who have been arid are being
sent hack from behind the lines. It is
good general practice which I really
need : so a few months of it won't do
any harm, but I would hate to think
of spending a life in such an out-of-the
way place as this. There arc only two
other Americans here at present, but
Americans have a way of going every
where. I'll like it better when I have
learned a little more French, I think;
for no one speaks English. I brought a
French nurse and an interpreter with
me to help out with the language. There
is no use to ask any questions, because
by the time you get this, and I get an
answer, I'll be coming home. It is over
three months since I heard from you.
Seems like that many years. It takes all
my moral courage to write tonight, for
I have found a truly Saturday Evening
Post, and it is like meeting an old
friend in a strange land, hut it will keep
and the trip I had yesterday is worth
telling you about while it is fresh in
my mind. We drove by auto up into
(he mountains.
A distance of about 200 kilometers
it was an old road cut in the side of
the rocky mountains by the Romans
nearly 14 centuries ago on one side
the steep mountain rose covered with
small scrubby underbrush or purple
heather on the other the deep preci
pice thousands of feet down ire some
places, the views were magnificent
just as beautiful as thru some parts
of our own Rockys. After we reached
the top we wound around thru chest
nut forests past stone houses where
the peasants live, thru some rather
level farming country and came at
last to a quiet little village where we
visited some refugees and paid a call
to some friends of Mrs. Foich (the
superintendent of my district.) They
were very charming French people
who live here in Privas during the
winter, but who were spending the
summer there in the country on the
old family estate, the home built
many centuries ago in a very spacious,
comfortable, and to me, most inter
esting old mansion. They insisted
that we stay for supper and as it
was getting late and we had a three
hour trip ahead of us before we could
get home. We consented, I wish you
could have seen the spread we had,
even in this awful time of war when
( Continued on page 4.)

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