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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, October 29, 1918, Image 2

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1918-10-29/ed-1/seq-2/

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TACR TWO
The DAILY STAE-mE^pR
Published every evening
at Moscow, I
GEO. N. LAM PH ERE, Publisher.
Wo Official Newspaper of the Gty of
mjt--,——
« f£cond-cjxs| matter Oct
thp postofftcc of Moscow,
r Act of Ccgjgrws of
1911,
ch, ipv.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Bclivercd by carrier to any part of city:
fer IfOQth'...... .S0c
tirée Months .
Six Months .
fa
fl.SO
.Ms
S.00
By MÿU
of city agd on rural routes) :
iin&S
40c
$1.25
Three Months ..
-Six Months .
One Year .
.. 270
4.00
Herber of the Associated Press
The Associated Press is exclusively
antkled to thc'use for publication of all
■ews dispatches credited to it, or not
Otherwise credited, in this paper, and
-also to local news published herein. All
rights of republication of special dis
patches herein are also reserved. .
It may seem hard for parents who
come here from long distances to visit
their sick sons who are in the S. A.
T. C., to be denied the privilege of
spending a lot of time with their
loved ones, or doing, as one mother
wanted to do, take him out to a pri
vate house for treatment. But the
men are being better cared for than
they could be in private homes. They
are getting every care possible and
the army regulations—and parents
seem to forget that these men are
now real soldiers and subject to mili
tary rules—forbid these things. The
government has had more experience
in caring for sick soldiers than any
person has and it is working diligently
to keep the well men in good health
and to quickly cure the sick. Parents
must remember that everything pos
sible is being done for their sons and
they are receiving the best of treat
ment here.
m ri r.
The third constitutional amendment
to be voted on next Tuesday is the
abolition of the office of state school
superintendent. The board of educa
tion, including Miss Redfield, the
superintendent
of
state
present
schools, have advised that people vote
for this amendment, which will re
duce the number of state offices by
one and make a big saving in salary
and expenses. The duties of the state
• superintendent of schools can be per
formed by the state commissioner of
education and with a man like Dr.
Bryan in that office, the educational
affairs of the state will not be ne
glected by abolishing the office of
state superintendent 'of schools. That
is one amendment to the constitution
that many well informed people
lieve should be carried.
sa w
The people of Idaho will be glad
yvhen the election is over. The con
test is becoming so strenuous and bit
ter that it may take some time
eliminate the sore spots made during
the campaign. Idaho is one of the
grandest states in the Union and will
come out all right. It is an encourag
ing sign when voters take so much
interest in an election. It shows that
a majority of them have the state's
interests at heart and fully 90 per
cent will vote for what they honestly
believe to be the best interests
Idaho. The trouble is that the other
10 per cent are doing the greatest
nmoont of talking and will, natorally
reap the reward if their organization
is successful.
h ri H
Vote against the first constitutional
amendment This provides for hold
ing a state constitutional convention
which would cost an enormous sum,
disarrange all our law and the work
of the former constitution and legis
latures and it might result in the loss
of the University of Idaho to North
ern Idaho. Let us take no chances.
If constitutional changes are needed
they can be obtained by voting as is
being done at the election this year.
It is dangerous to call a constitutional
convention. The taxpayers do not
want it.
Ä te I8S
President Wilson counters on
Roosevelt and Lodge by republishing
appeals made by them for the people
to elect a republican congress in 1898
to "back up President McKinley and
show the old world that the people
indorse his attitude in the war and
have confidence in him." Honors, in
this wordy battle seem to be about
even.
te
There will be rejoicing among the
vocational training men because the
harvester plant is again working and
the men, who have been held in idle
ness, are again at work. Nothing
will serve to keep the men in good
health and spirits as much as clean,
healthful work. Loafing is a hard
ship for the average American of that
age.
Observe the quarantine rules and
help save •Moscow from the terrible
experience of other towns. It is fear
ed the crest of the influenza wave has
not been reached here and careful ob
servante of the regulation* jpay say*
prjdoui Hyp.' ^
Tfce flks pffupsccqr ary recyivinf
words of commendation Cferywhepg
for their kindness in throwing open
their fine club rooms to the convales
cents of the influenza. People in other
towfl# app talking of thi| king act by
the piks.
m r •»
TbP k*iser eert*i^r dp^» not lack
for nerve. When the German people
demanded his abdication he offered,
as a compromise, to allovr thgm te
form a republic with bim 4S presi
dent with powers only ''slightly' cur
failed
m m m
Across the line in Washington so
little interest is being taken in poli
tics that the campaign fails to arouse
interest. There has never been, since
Washington was admitted as a state,
such lethargy just before election.
Ik n n
It is as much a patriotic duty to
register before November 2 and vote
on November 5, as it is to buy Lib
erty bonds or help other war work.
Do your duty, Mr. and Mrs. Voter.
ARE VERY GRATEFUL
WRITE LETTERS TO TELL OF
THEIR GRATITUDE FOR AS
SISTANCE RENDERED
The French class in Asotin high
school whose instructor is Miss Hen
rietta Safford, has adopted two French
orphans, Jules Bachimont, Boulleus,
France, taken by class as a whole,
and Marie Balcaen, a refugee child
from Montdidier, by two sisters,
Grace and Elizabeth McIntosh, of the
class.
The letter printed below has just
been received by Mrs. C. L.'Butter
field. In acknowledging the photo
graph of the writer of this letter,
which was sent after the first pay
ment to child was made, Mrs. Butter
field wrote a friendly letter of ap
preciation and thanks to the mother
which letter is referred to by writer,
Marie Yronne Gaillard is one of the
three children adopted by women of
Moscow who raised the money by en
tertaining for them. As stated be
fore in The Star-Mirror, original let
ters and photographs of children are
at the Wallace Jewelry Co. for in
spection
Simard, le 2 Octobre 1918.
It is with pleasure that I have re
ceived your good letter. I have been
able to have it translated immedi
ately, for I have a friend that un
derstands English. Believe, Madam,
that I am very happy to know that
you are interested in my child left an
orphan so sadly. It is four years
ago today since poor papa left for
France. It is a very painful anni
versary for me, because I have been
much affected by this loss.
I see that you have already been
to France and that you hope to come
again after the war. If that happens,
come to see us, if possible, as it would
give us much pleasure.
And now I wish to thank you for
the second remittance which I re
ceived yesterday. I am very grateful
for it. Will you accept, madam, With
my sincere thanks, the expression
my sentiments ?
be
to
Devotedly,
FRE GAILLARD.
A Simard Saône et Loire
France.
My dear Madam:
It is with all my heart that I thank
yol for the remittance, which you
sent me and I was very pleased to
receive your letter, because you
thought you might see me. I shall
be very glad to know you too. I send
you my sincere respects and permit
me to send you also, my best kisses.
Your little protege,
MARIE YRONNE GAILLARD
(Paid Advertising.)
Republican Ticket
U. S. Senator
(Long Term)
W. E. BORAH
U. S. Senator
(Short Term)
FRANK R. GOODING
Representative in Congress
(First District)
BURTON L. FRENCH
Justice of the Supreme Court
ALFRED BUDGE
Governor
D. W. DAVIS
Lieutenant Governor
C. C. MOORE
Secretary of State
ROBERT O. JONES
State Auditor
EDWARD G. GALLETT
State Treasurer
JOHN W. EAGLESON
Attorney General
ROY L. BLACK
Superintendent of Public Instruction
ETHEL E. REDFIELD
Inspector of Mines
ROBERT N. BELL
Jndge of the District Court
EDGAR E. STEELE
State Senator
E. W. PORTER
State Representatives
(Vote for Three)
ALFRED S. ANDERSON
HOMER W. CANFIELD
C. J. HUGO
County Commissioner
(First District)
JOHN CONE
County Commissioner
(Second District)
ELMER M. PAULSON
County Commissioner
(Third District)
COLUMBUS CLARK
Clerk of the District Conti and fix-.
}pHI$ ö L e? WOOI}Y
County Treasurer and Ex-Officio Pub
lic Administrator and Tax Collector
IONA 8. ADAIR
Probate Judge
ADRIAN NELSON
Cagpty SupsriaUrfe^ tf
Instruction
A BO S
LILLIAN M. SfAfT
Bounty Assessor
EMMET Jf. QEMMILL
For Coroner
GLEN O. GRICE
h&S&tIs '
ITH
Pros ec uting Attorney
JOHN NISBET
To thç Voter* and Tax Payers of
Latah County:
One of the most important duties
of the citizens of Latah county hav
ing just been performed in raising its
quota of the Fourth Liberty Loan,
we are certainly all grateful. But
there are other duties which must be
met by the people of the county.
As chairman of the Republican or
ganization of Latah county I appeal
to you one and all before casting your
ballot on November 5th, 1918, that
you study the Republican ticket care
fully and give it due consideration.
I point with pride to the conduct
of Latah county, its economical hand
ling by our county officials, and call
your attention to the fact that it is
the best governed county in the state.
The following statement from Byron
Defenbach & Sons, public accountants,
who have audited practically every
county in Northern Idaho, stands as
a strong testimonial to the officials
now directly responsible for handling
the finances of Latah county, and
which statement appears in the Poca
tello Tribune under date of October
3, 1918.
"Comparing the various counties of
the state by sections from an account
ant's standpoint, the broad general
statement is made that the Northern
counties of Idaho are far superior to
those of the South, and Latah county
is pronounced to be the best governed
county in Idaho."
The governing power of Latah
county has been in the hands of Re
publican officials for several years
last past, and our candidates nominat
ed at the primary are known by all
to be loyal citizens and thoroughly
capable to handle the affairs of this
county if elected.
Again asking your loyal support
and favorable consideration, I am,
Respectfully yours, .
C. A. HAGAN,
Chairman.
♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
MARKETS
4*4*44*444*4444
The following market quotations
are the prices paid to the producer
by the dealer and are changed daily,
thus giving the public the accurate
quotations in all classes of grain,
produce and meats.
Hay and Grain
Wheat, Bluestem No. 1, bulk,

*
net, delivered to warehouses $2.02%
Wheat, Bluestem, No. 1, sacked
net, delivered to warehouses 2.11%
Wheat, Fortyfold, No. 1, bulk,
net, delivered to warehouses 2.02%
Wheat, Fortyfold, No. 1, sTted,
net, delivered to warehouses 2.11%
Wheat, White Club, No. 1 bulk,
net, delivered to warehouses 2.00%
Wheat, White Club, No. 1, sited
net, delivered to warehouses 2.09%
Wheat, Red Russian, No. 1 bulk
pet, delivered to warehouses 1.97%
Wheat, Red Russian, No. 1 sit'd
net, delivered to warehouses 2.06%
No. 1 Feed Oats sacked, per
hundred .
No. 1 Timothy Hay....
White Beans, per pound
Produce.
of
3.15
$34.00
08%
Eggs, per doz.
Butter, creamery, per lb
Butter, ranch, per lb.
Potatoes, per cwt.
Young chickens, per lb...
Hogs, live wt., light, per lb.16c
Old roosters, per lb
Hogs, dressed, heavy, per lb... 19 at 20c
Hogs, dressed, light, per lb... [email protected]
Veal, live wt., per lb.6 at 8c
Veal, dressed, per [email protected]
Spring Lambs, per lb.
Mutton, per lb.
50c
66c
60c
$ 1.00
15c
08c
10c
6 at 8c
Thompson Insurance Agency
Fire Insurance, Automobile ni
Plate Glass Insurance, Fidelity and
Casualty Bonds
J. G. Vennigerholz, Pimp.
Moscow, Idaho.
Jk
\
Well Done
We desire to express our admira
tion to the 661 of our patrons for
having loyally subscribed through
us the magnificent sum of $154,
150.00 to the Fourth Liberty Loan.
What has been our loss is the
Government's gain.
;
FIRST TRUST
S SA VINOS RANK
Always at Your Service.
A Beautiful Woman.
Do you know {hat a beautjiul wo
S an always l)ys a goojj digestion
your digestion is faulty, eat lightly
Ä'"t 2 SÄ 0 &X.
gf meats, a
pf Chamber
en your digestion. Price 26c.
—t:-—IE .- ■ '
Hotel Most»« AmiaJ«.
Monday October 28, 1918.
James Penfleld, Sppkane ; John Voelk
er, Spokane;). Mill's and wife, jtamiah;
J. W. Mcfiifiley, VorK ; L. A- Dol
larhide, Walla Wâlla ; J. J. Staley,' Pull
man ; C. XT. Laselfe, Denver; F. ...
Roscbootn, Spokane ; J. L- Primp".
Kansas City; Melvin A. Cowl, New
York; D. C. Johnson, Spokane ; R, $■
WysSfninrt, Spo^àhc'; John D. Porter,
Spokane; Walter D. Roberts, Spokane;
Fred Rantz, Spokane ; Fred Lower, Pa
louse; Alfred S. Anderson, Moscow; L.
H. Wheeler, Spattle; Harry Mute, Cleve
land ; E. B. Hanson, Salt Lake ; G. P.
Ekeland, Spokane ; F. L. Neal, Spokane
D. W. Ames, Seattle.
H.
Elmer E. Paulson
REPUBLICAN CANDIDATE FOR
County
Commissioner
SECOND DISTRICT
ELECTION NOVEMBER 5, 1918
.
1
John L. Woody
REPUBLICAN CANDIDATE FOR
Sheriff
ELECTION NOVEMBER 5, 1918
DEMOCRATIC CANDIDATE FOR
ELECTION NOVEMBER 5, 1918
, "
L ^ '
Girl Smith
DEMOCRATIC CANDIDATE FOR
County
Commissioner
SECOND DISTRICT
ELECTION NOVEMBER 5, 1918
Fanners Busy Plowing.
W. A. Vosburgh, a fafippr jp thg Sup
shinp neighborhood, is in towp tod|y an(j
jays farmers in that sccfiop are'bù$lf
pjowiiy; and the ground Is ip fihp con
dition. There has been 1 enojjgh pjin Ip
place the soil in prime condition' for
plowing and farmers are taking advan
tage of this condition. A large acreage
of' fall «heat has been sown, hnt thp
land now being plowed will not be plant
' tp' /a}| whe j, bin wij^' be placed in
readiness for parly Miring seeding. Mr.
ur gh hjs 140 açÇcs p£ Jand plowed.
»
;
ed
V<

LATAH COUNTY
TITLE A TBIHHUE4JMPANY
Abstracts of Title Conveyancing
Mortgage Loans
J. A. McbANin
Moscow, Idaho
Dentist
Phone 229
FINEST LINE OF HIGH GRADE
WOOLENS. YOUR INSPECTION
SOLICITED
O. H. SCHWARZ, Tailor.
!T^"
JOHN W. STEVENSON, M. D.
Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat
Glasses Fitted
Office of Dr. Aspray, 303 3rd Ats
P hone 177
Go to
J. N. FRIEDMAN
for your Harness and Supplies.
Shoes and Shoe Repairing. Par
cels Post Patronage Solicited.
Orland 8c Lee
ATTORNEYS and COUNSELORS AT LAW
}
Practice in District, State, Federal Courts
Office: First National Bank Bldg.
MOSCOW, IDAHO
-4
♦ -
HIDES TANNED
Bring your Beef Hides and Horse
Hides to Inland Market and have
them made into fine robes or coats.
Look for sample in the display
window.
We represent the biggest tannery
in the world, Cowneie Tanning Co.
Ask to See Sample at
Inland Market
CARL F. ANDERSON, Prop.
You will find yon save more
and live better if you trade at
the
THIRD STREET
MARKET
CHICKENS, GEESE, DUCKS
AND HIDES WANTED
PHONG 248
L. M. KITLEY
Monuments
THE MOSCOW MARBLE
WORKS
George H. Moody, Proprietor
Has the finest Une of Monuments
and all Kinds of Marble Work to
be/ound in the Inland Empire
PRICES REASONABLE
See Our Work Before Ordering
Victrolas and
Victor Records
Sherfey's Book Store
Moscow, Idaho
If It's New We Are Sure the
First to Have It
• •'

: Botel Moscow *
TOM WRIGHT, Prop. *
4*
4*
4
4*
4*
I Thoroughly Modern *
■ FIRST CLASS GRILL
•?* AUTO BUS AT ALL TRAINS ?
T
4*
4
Wash Thai
Itch Away
jss%^£s^is^ss ^s. rs
did not feci immediately tUtVMderflOlf
the pores, sires instant relief from the most
O. D
corner" drug store
4. t f.^nt jkf.i
CLASSIFIED ADS
EMU? WANTEfi— Feq»»lç
Miss Nora Nelson of Troy is shopping
in Moscow.
HELP WANTÈD — Mal«
WANTED—MAN AND WIFE TO
work on ranch; write Clarence A.
Anderson, Gifford, Idaho, Route 2.
25-31
HELP WANTED
Home.
PLEASANT
22-tf
WANTED — 50 PRUNE PICKERS.
Inquire U. S. Employment Service.
FOR RENT—Rooms
FOR RENT —A ROOM WITH OR
without sleeping porch; hot and cold
•»■ater ; modem conveniences ; price rea
onabe. 425 East Third St. Mrs. D.
I3tf
FOR RENT—FURNISHED APART
ments and furnished rooms at
Eggan's apartments. Phone 206H.
231-tf
rquhart.
FOR TRADE
WANTED—TO EXCHANGE ONE
two bottom 14-inch gang plow for
three bdttom. Phone 9251. J. H. Dye.
289-tf
FOR RENT—Houses
FOR RENT —6-ROOM HOUSE, 228
South Monroe. Phone 180L.
24tf
FOR RENT—AN 8-ROOM MODERN
house, near the dormitory; ready
on the 17th of this month. Phone
170J. Mrs. John Shannon.
3-tf
ONE OF OUR MODERN COTTAGES
on N. Jackson St. will be for rent
in a few days. Inquire at Hagan &
Cushing's
6-tf
FOR RENT, SALE OR TRADE—
Eight-room modern house, 446
Lewis St. Rent $15 per month. J. E.
Anderton.
26-32
WANTED—Miscellaneous
WANTED—GOOD LIVE DEALER
to sell the best truck on the market
Can make deliveries 1 to 5 tons. Write
Rochester Motor Co., 1012 Sprague
Ave., Spokane, Wash.
235-tf
WANTED — SEVERAL TONS OF
carrots. Phone 9267.
26tf
WANTED TO RENT—AN OFFICE
desk. Telephone 352.
291-tf
FQH SALE—Real Eatfte
» ,
FOR RENT—ONE LARGE 3-ROOM
apartment, $15; one 3-room apart
ment, slightly smaller, $12; one 2
room apartment, $10; one 2-room
apartment, $9; two furnished rooms,
$7. 310 South Lilly. Phone 338.
25-tf
FOR SALE—A 5-ROOM MODERN
residence; good cellar and garage.
Phone 263H. FrJd Stone.
16-tf
FOR SALE—S-ROOM MODERN
residence; chpice location, corner lot,
garage, etc. Phone 267Y. Sam Silvey.
255-tf.
FOR SALE —HOUSE AND LOT,
corner First and Polk Sts. Inqttire
Mrs. Wm. Arnett 244tf
FOR SALE — 80 ACRES THREE
miles east of Moscow ; house and barn.
Write E. R. Fuller, Lewistgn, Idaho, or,
see N. G, Gilbertson, adjoining farm. 6tf
FOB SALE—Miscellaneous
FOR SALE —PEA STRAW IN
stack, $8 per ton. Phone 911X3.
,26-32
HAY FOR SALE—3 TON TIMOTHY,
1 ton grain at $25. Phone 9417.
25-tf
Frank
23-28
*
W. Langdon.
Hubbard squash for sale.
Comstock. Phone 138W.
FOR SALE OR TRADE—ONE TWO
ton truck and wood saw combined;
one six H. P. gasoline wood saw.
George W. Smith. Phone 31J 14-26
jpLINE - KNIGHT 7-PASSENGER
touring car, in good condition, for sale
r trade. Moscow Auto & Supply Co.
283tf
FOR SALE—1 DEERING BINDER;
sell for cash or trade in stock. M. J,
Schu, Moscow, Idaho. Rt. 3.
244tf
SELDEN TRUCKS SOLD ON DE
ferred payment plan. Write Rochester
Motor Co., 1012 Sprague Ave., Spo
kane, Wash.
235-tf
FOR SALE—Live Stock
FOR SALE —REGISTERED CHES
ter white pigs, both sexes. Call 927X2.
_ 13-40
Cafe.
MISCELLANEOUS
THOSE WISHING ODD JOBS DONE
phone Ray Stevens, c-o Plummer's
25-tf
WANTED—BY TWO UNIVERSITY
students, board and room in private
family. Address box 138. _ . ..
25-27
FOUND—A WATCH. OWNER CAN
have same by proving property and
Phone 198J after 6
» 27-29
paying for ad.
p. m.
PIANO FOR RENT—FOR TERMS
call W. A. Lauder, phone 9148. 27

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