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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, October 30, 1918, Image 5

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1918-10-30/ed-1/seq-5/

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THE DAILY STAR-MIRROR, MOSCOW IDAHO, WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 30. 1918
PAGE FIVE
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We Emphatically Refuse To
Frighten You
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into believing that Ready-to-Wear Prices will be higher or that there will be a shortage of Garments.
THERE POSITIVELY WILL NOT BE; in fact, it is scarcely a month since the War Economy Board at Washington gave out the statement that
there would be an ample supply of wool for manufacturing purposes, and that now there were enormous quantities of piece goods held in reserve by
several of the larger manufacturers.
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RIGHT NOW WE CAN AND ARE BUYING READY-TO-WEAR GARMENTS FROM SOM E OF THE LARGEST HOUSES IN THE
COUNTRY AT A DISCOUNT. We are reducing our prices accordingly for Our Annual Thanksgiving Sale; and, mind you, the garments offered
you by this shop have been here only a month at the most—some less than a week. They are not garments purchased a year ago for sales purposes.
Please remember that this shop has made the lowest prices known on High-grade Wearing Apparel in the Inland Empire for the past five years, and
will continue to make those prices.
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The Annual Thanksgiving Sale—starting Friday morning at 9:00 o'clock—will prove the above statements. Again we say:
BU Y !" It's the only real test and a plan we have always encouraged.
44
LOOK BEFORE YOU
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THE FASHION SHOP
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"Where Price and Quality Meet
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Tonight and
i
Weather — Idaho
Thursday, fair and warmer.
Mrs. Mary E. Langdon went to Joel
today. Mrs. Langdon's son Cecil is an
aviator at Dallas, Texas.
R. W. McKeehan of Troy has been
visiting at the home of David O'Dell
near Viola.
Miss Edith Briscoe, who has been
visiting several weeks with her sister,
Mrs. H. C. McDonald, of East D street,
went to her home today at Grangeville.
Mrs. H. Strong of Lewiston arrived
yesterday to visit her son of the S. A.
T. C., who is sick at the hospital.
H. P. Eggan left on the early train
this morning for La Crosse, Wash., to
be gone a few days on business.
Otto Conner came to Moscow this
morning from Southwick.
J. S. Vickery and A. Heimgartner are
in town today from Fix Ridge, near
Juliaetta and are arranging for a farm
sale.
t
V
Scott Ogden has been appointed at
torney to assist the committee of
civilian relief in that department of Red
Cross work.
Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Headrick returned
today after a two months' visit in Spo
kane. They will live on their farm
southeast of Moscow.
R. E. Allen, who bought the H. L.
Coats' farm, northwest of Moscow is
in the city today.
Word has been received that a son
has arrived at the home of Chas.
Wethered, now of the Federal Mining
company of Wallace. This event is im
portant since it is the first grandchild
of Mrs. D. Wethered of this city.
Mrs. Eli Hopkins of Kent, Wash., is
here to take care of her husband, who
confined to his bed with rheumatism
at the home of S. G. Shellabarger.
The funeral of little Carol Sether will
occur Thursday at 2 o'clock p. m. _
Theo. Cameron of Coeur d'Alene is ex
pected here to conduct the open-air serv
ice at the cemetery.
Miss Madge Marlatt of Spokane is vis
iting Miss Margaret Yangle for a few
days.
D. W. Hannah went to Spokane this
morning.
IS
Rev.
Nelson's Bazaar of Third street, is
the street into the build
moving across _ i
ing formerly occupied by Bostwick s res
taurant.
Mrs. C. A. Wright of East Second
visit from her moth
street is enjoying a
. er, Mrs. Theo. Gibson of Great Falls,
Mont. Theo. Gibson arrived today for a
few days' visit, when he and wife ex
return to their home in Mon
pect to
tana.
Dr. J. J. Harrington of Moscow, who
went to Nczpercc to help fight the_
fluenza, came home today. Dr. Harnng
contracted the disease but is
m
rc
ton
covering.
Miss Myyrtle O'Dell of Viola went to
Troy today to visit a few days.
Miss Mary Brown is in town from
Troy, today shopping.
Mrs. Lonella McKee of Third and
Howard is expecting her daughter, Mrs.
Everett Weeks, from Puffer, Canada,
for a visit.
Mrs. Lelia Jain of Genesee is a visitor
in Moscow today.
Mrs. A. A. Haymond and daughter,
Elizabeth and Mrs. John Kemp of
Genesee are in the city today shopping.
Gerald Meeker is confined to his
bed with the influenza.
All W. C. T. U. ladies please re
member to leave fruit and jelly for
the soldier boys at Mrs. Owings this
week.
Little Kenneth Stanton, who has
been having the influenza for several
days, is slightly improved.
H .E. Erickson and C. A. Lundquist
each donated five sacks of apples for
the soldier boys. The apples were
collected, hauled in and distributed
by Ed. Riley and M. B. Dallas. A
Dodge Brothers truck was used.
Oakey Hall, democratic nominee for
probate judge, is in town today from
BoVill. The Bovill schools, of which
Mr. Hall is superintendent, being
closed gives him an opportunity to
do some campaigning.
W. E. Heard, democratic nominee
for county auditor, is in town today
from his ranch in Thorn Creek pre
cinct.
| "
Mrs. George Carter contributed a
fine lot of jellies and jam to the sol
diers mess today. Mrs. C. J. Langdon
is another liberal contributor of fruit
and jelly. Mrs. C. W. Hall also
brought in a fine lot of fruit and
jelly.
. Homer Estes, following the directions
of the provost marshal general, has ap
pointed a committee, called a Board of
Instructors, to assist the local draft
hoard in giving preliminary instruction
to those who come for physical examina
tion. This instruction is along certain
lines that will be of value to boys ex
pecting to enter the service, such as
physical well being, insurance, right liv
ing, etc. On this committee have been
annointed Mrs. C. J. Orland, chairman;
W. F. Morgareidgc, secretary : J. H.
Forney, Rev. H. O. Perry, and George
It has been arranged that
Creighton.
Lieutenant Bleamaster and Rev. Perry
will address the boys who are being ex
amined today.
*1
MUSIC SCHOOL CROWS
SIEE CLUBS FORMED
STÜDENT AND FACULTY RE
CITALS SCHEDULED THIS
YEAR
In spite of war conditions and the
smaller enrollment of girls, it is ex
pected there will be an unusual amount
of music on the campus this year. More
than the average number of students are
majoring in music, and there are a
great many students in all the musical
Large glee clubs for both the boys
and the girls have been organized, but
the quarantine has caused a somewhat
temporary delay of rehearsals. How
ever, a rehearsal of the boys' club is
scheduled for Monday night and it is
hoped work with the girls may con
tinue next week.
Mr. Bangs, who kindly volunteered
to lead the band until a permanent lead
er might be secured, has it nicely started
now. Practices are held twice a week,
but as yet no special time for meeting
has been scheduled.
Miss Wegmann is working on her
repertoire, and hopes to give a recital
as soon as the quarantine is over. She
also expects to have several student
recitals thruout the year.
Private lessons in music are being
given now to all students on Ihe
campus.
QUARANTINE RULES
STILL ENFORCED
MILITARY POLICE "SHOO" AWAY
ALL SUSPECTS FROM
CAMPUS
The military police, or more familiarly,
the M. P's, have made their first ap
pearance on the campus. On the original
force, Bill Newmon, was chief of staff,
and Robert Davis the roundsman.
"Poozey" was taken with the
however, and Erwin Lamb was appointed
in his place.
There has been no difficulty in pre
serving law and order about the campus,
A) the chief duties of the M. P's are,
meeting the trains and keeping the fac
ulty members out of the barber shops.
The first train the police meet comes
in at 10:41 mornings, and the last comes
in at 7:58 in the evening. Anyone taken
from the trains who wishes to enter the
University quarantine is sent to the
Christian Science church.
He must stay there four days, or until
the doctor in charge finds he hasn't the
"Flu." When four days are up the person
is within the University quarantine and
must obey quarantine regulations.
Military policemen fake five or six
people to the Christian Science church
every day. Some of their victims are
vocational men who have just come in,
and others are returned students and
instructors who have been taking an un
official leave of absence during the
"Flu" scare.
'Flu,"
PROMINENT IDAHO STUDENT
IS CRITICALLY ILL
Ralph B. Gochnour, a former student
at the University and a reporter for the
Argonaut, is in a very critical condition
T. C. He was taken to the hospital
on October 20 with a case of the "Flu,'
which * developed into complication of
typhoid fever and pneumonia and is
looked for soon. Mr. Gochnour is a
very prominent man on the campus and
his condition is being anxiously watched
by many friends.
r
NEAR RIOT ON STEPS
I
SALE OF COOKIES AND POP
CORN BALLS TO S. A. T. C. MEN
CAUSES TURMOIL
The north steps of the Administration
building were the scene of a near riot
last Wednesday afternoon. The mem
bers of Phi Upsilon Omicrow the Home
Economics professional fraternity saw
the desire for sweets on the campus
during the quarantine and endeavored
to satisfy it.
With due respect to Herbert Hoover's
as well as the Board of Health's rules
of conservation and congregation the
girls succeeded in making popcorn balls.,
chocolate and oatmeal cookies and mac
aroons. Just before the boys were dis
missed at 2:30, three Home Economic
seniors, Cora Mae Jones, Ruth York,
and Helga Anderson, appeared in white
aprons, carrying a huge basket filled
with their wares.
A non-com on his way from the
building aroused no little excitement
when he waved a fresh piece of crack
erjack before the eyes of his hungry
fellows. Then the fun began. The boys
rushed toward the steps, cries of "Me
next," "Sack of popcorn,'
just so it's a cookie," almost deafened
the busy girls. It was with great dis
appointment that they sold the last
crumb, knowing they must send many
a boy away with only a peek at the
empty basket.
The sale met with such a warm wel
come that the fraternity expects to re
peat it on a larger scale soon. The
proceeds will be used for war work.
'Any kind
»
Dean Eldridge Has Slight Operation
Dean Eldridge underwent an opera
tion for tonsilitus at a local hospital
Monday.
The dean's condition was not serious
and he was reported as progressing fa
vorably shortly after the operation.
He expects to be able to go on with
his work by the middle of the week.
3380 Garden Club members in Idaho
this year are raising 640 acres of
garden "sass," valued at $50,000.
LEIHfHROLD BOV
RUSES BIS SPUDS
ARDIE GUSTAFSEN MAKES
PROFIT BY GROWING
POTATOES
Ardie Gustafson, 10 years old, son
of F. M. Gustafson, living three miles
southwest of Moscow, owner of Sun
nyside farm, is making a success of
agriculture. The boy secured 15
pounds of Idaho Rural potatoes for
seed last spring, getting them from
Professor Wilson, club leader for La
tah county. He has just dug 435
pounds of extra choice potatoes.
He has several other varieties, in
cluding Early Rose, Netted Gem and
Early Ohio. From the latter variety
he dug from one row, with 295 hills
in it, 10 large sacks full of fine po
tatoes, but the Idaho Rurals are said
to be especially fine, uniform, large
and perfect in every way. The little
fellow has not dug his Early Rose and
Netted Gems yet. He will make a re
port to Club Leader Wilson and hopes
to win a prize.
Mr. Gustafson brought in 2825
pounds of fine potatoes today for
which he received a cent a pound.
These were taken from three rows, of
295 hills each, an average of 942
pounds to the row or almost 3 1-2
pounds to the hill. Mr. Gustafson
brought a Mills Prize potato weigh-
ing four pounds and four ounces to
the editorial room of The Star-Mirror
where it was placed on exhibition in
the window. He says he raised scores
of potatoes weighing more than three
pounds each. He has about two acres
of potatoes this year.
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FOOTBALL SCHEDULE IS UPSET
Practice is Called Off This Week—
Sunday's Game is Prevented
by Rain
Football practice was called off this
week in the collegiate section of the
S. A. T. C.
it is generally supposed to be that it
was either an order from Lieutenant
Katolik who desires to utilize every way
possible to prevent the spread of the
"Flu," or on account of three men re
ceiving slight injuries in practice last
Saturday evening.
A game was scheduled for last Sunday
afternoon, but the rain prevented it.
Lieutenants Meehan and Hansen had
announced that they would give a feed to
the team winning two out of three games,
and a number of the boys are disappoint
ed because they think their chance for
that feed is gone.
Should practice be resumed it is not
probable that football will be attempted
this year with outside teams on account
of the Spanish influezna.
No reason was given, tho
Section B Po st Exchange.
Quartermaster Sergeant George S.
Marshall has been a very but y man the
past two weeks. The company quarter
master sergeant is the general utility
man of the company and Sergeant
Marshall has lived up to the qualifica
tions of the office of post exchange.
A canteen has been established by
the local chapter of the Red Cross so
ciety for the benefit of the "boys and has
been placed in charge of Sergeant
Marshall.
The proceeds of the canteen go to
ward a mess fund for Section B. Re
ceipts of the canteen vary from 50c to
$100 a day.
Tobaccos, candy, stationery and spe
cial articles called for by the men are
sold. Mrs. Agatha S. Hutton from the
local chapter oversees the purchasing
and disposition of the funds,
comfort has been derived from the
Post Exchange.
Much
LATAH COUNTY
TITLE & TRUST COMPANY
Abstracts of Title Conveyancing
Mortgage Loans
■ ?
N •
'V'
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Robert 0. Jones
OF KELLOGG, FOR
Secrertary oj State
HE IS A FORMER LATAH COUN
TY MAN AND IS A GRADUATE
OF OUR STATE UNIVERSITY. IN
HIS WORK AS A LEGISLATOR HE
PROVED A ZEALOUS WORKER IN
NORTH IDAHO MATTERS AND
WAS PARTICULARLY INSISTENT
THAT THE UNIVERSITY OF IDA
HO SHOULD RECEIVE FAIR
TREATMENT

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