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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, November 02, 1918, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1918-11-02/ed-1/seq-4/

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That the arrangement by which Adrian Nelson
has acted as probate judge and clerk of the district
court since April, 1917, by which the salary of one
official was saved to the taxpayers of the county
will be continued, is assured by the statement of
the Republican county platform to which both Judge
Nelson and Homer Estes, county auditor and clerk
of the district court have subscribed. The following
plank from the Republican platform is here re
produced:
''We heartily recommend the action of the board
of county commissioners of Latah county in ap
pointing Adrian Nelson to the office of probate
judge and thereby consolidating the office of the
clerk of the district court and the office of probate
judge at a saving to the taxpayers of more than
one thousand dollars per annum, and if elected,
Homer E. Estes, Republican candidate for clerk of
the district court and ex-officio auditor and re
corder, pledges himself in the event of Adrian Nel
son's election to the office of probate judge to re
appoint him to the office of deputy clerk of the
district court in order that the same economical
administration may be continued as that which now
exists, and if elected, Adrian Nelson, Republican
candidate for probate judge, pledges himself that
he will continue to perform the duties of the two
offices for the next two years."
To the foregoing statement we give our full ap
proval and pledge ourselves to carry out its pro
visions.
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!• i' A
NORTH IDAHO MUST H
congressional district in
he southern
as the 10
t, a< tually lives in the
bt-ing in Washington \
setien would therefor j j
d have no !
house of i
congress, tor un ie is not the remotest I
possibility that Frank Moore, of Mos- \
cow, will defeat Senator Borah. Or- j
dinarily the Miner gives little atîen- 1
tion to geographical lines in the se- ]
lection of candidates, but in this case j
the bare possibility of leaving this i
large and populous section of the state i
without direct representation in either |
house of congress is sufficient reas- j
on to call the possible injustice to \
the attention of voters. j
But outside of geographical consid
erations, the candidacy of Burton L. |
French apeals strongly to the people !
The fi
al con
clip
fl;
well
pa:
a
the
I ;
northern
happens,
or design, that Pur

either by c
cell, the
.
nnaitisan
i the
emo
rass
tea
CD
'Oil;
irn
n;
south, his h>
county. H
mean that a
représentait
mh
dan
won!
eiti
HEALTH OFFICER
DR. ADAIR CALLS ON PEOPLE
TO USE MORE CARE TO PRE
VENT INFLUENZA
Dr. Adiar has issued a number of
warnings to the public and asks the press
> to repeat them. First he insists that
; children be not permitted to congregate
hin groups and that, at the first signs of
a cold or illness they be kept in doors
and cared for. He thinks it a bad idea
to let children visit other homes and tells
of numerous cases where the disease has
been carried in this way.
Dr. Adair suggests that merchants can
help greatly if they will watch their
and when one has a cold or
I
■>
. E REPRESENTATIVE
i to tlose of the south
who are not inoculated with nonparti
service as
r'-'wnlf' Ve f the state in the
lower house, Mr. French is in better
ui n I >v t' rn ever before to serve
He knows legis
mtive piocedure, has a wide acquaint
; nee in both houses of congress, and
is in position to get results which
would be impossible for a new man,
and especially one who would owe his
election to his
cughly
ration.
congress proper is only part of his
service to the people of Idaho. His
close personal attention to depart
mental matters is proverbial, and in
this way he serves his constituents di
rectly and effectively. Many a home
steader and prospector can attest to
the careful attention given by Mr.
French to the protection of their
claims in the interior department, and
they want to keep him there—Wallace
Miner.
:ic v t
i juougn Ion:
the people of Idaho.
filiation with a thor
d socialistic organi
But the record of His work in
■rei
her go home and he cared for until
can be told whether it is influenza or
something less harmful. He also sug
gests that merchants do not advertise
special sales days or sales hours that
might crowd their stores.
"if any one in your home has influ
enza do not admit any one into your
home,''.said Dr. Adair. He told of one
case where a woman lay sick and per
mitted a piano tuner to come into their
home to tune a piano. The man was
badly frightened when he heard that he
had been exposed to influenza.
Dr. Adair says the disease is being
spread through thoughtlessness of per
sons who do not take the situation seri
ously. He cautions all to be more care
ful and to observe the rules mentioned
above. Treat the first symptoms of
cold as if it were serious and thus pre
vent a serious sickness, he regards as
good plan to follow.
G. A, Meeks of Meeks' mill near Viola
is in the city today. He is accompanied
DOWNS NINE BALLOONS
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The photo shows Lieutenant F. Luke
who brought down three enemy bal
loons in the surprisingly short time of
thirty-five minutes. Luke comes from
Phoenix, Ariz., and he has done some
wonderful work as an airman. These
additional three bring his total for
three to nine. Nine enemy
balloons in three days !
SCARE MEXICANS OUT
Hun Propagandists at Work on
the Border.
Try to Prevent Mexicans Crossing
Over to Accept Employment in
United States.
Laredo, Texas.—German propagan
dists in northern Mexico and along
the border are actively engaged in in
stilling fright into Mexicans with a
view to preventing their crossing to
the American side and accepting em
ployment as laborers on farms, rail
roads, etc. One canard that has been
given considerable publicity by the
propagandists is that the Americans
are contemplating drafting all Mexi
can men between the ages of eighteen
and forty-five into the army, while all
Mexican women will also be forced in
to service and "taken to France, where
they will be used as washerwomen for
the American soldiers and the allies
generally."
These kind of reports have reached
I lie American consular service on the
border and they are exerting their ut
most efforts to set the. Mexicans right
by assuring them that none hut Ameri
can citizens will be subject to the se
lective draft, while, as for women,
there is absolutely no foundation for
the report that they will be conscripted
and used as washerwomen in France,
as there are any number of women al
ready in France and none others are
needed "for washerwomen."
Now that the new draft is in effect
it is expected that the German propa
gandists
kinds of
thwart the efforts of the Americans to
secure laborers from Mexico to do ag
ricultural and other work in this coun
try.
will be manufacturing all
deliberate falsehoods to
f Grandfather at 39.
but Is Not Citizen
.
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Rosedale, Kanj—August An- |
derson, thirty-nine, and a grand
father, has just found out he jj.
sh W as not a citizen of the United
States, following his registration 1
for the draft. Born In Sweden, J
^ he came to this country with his th
parents when two years of age. ^
Anderson has served two terms I
in the city council and has à son (
I now in the array. He was given «■
'j 5 ' his first papers.
«■
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FORTUNE STREWS THE TRACK
Package of $35,000 in Small Bills la
Broken When Thrown From
Train.
Sharon, Pa.—An express messenger
a Pennsylvania railroad train
speeding through West Middlesex,
here, hurled a package contain
ing $35,000 In small bills to the depot
platform. The package rebounded un
der the train and was cut in two.
The money was scattered for a consid
erable distance over the tracks. Po
lice officers and state police were sum
moned nnd stood guard over the vicin
ity until practically all of the moa
had been recovered. (
on
near
ey
,, ... - ,, , ,
Smce the reorganization of the state
council he has been its chairman and
active head. The duties of the two
offices have multiplied and Dr. Bryan
felt that as commissioner of educa
tion his entire time and attention
should be devoted to the duties of
that office. He was director of state
council affairs and the work carried
on required a great deal of personal
attention. Dr. Bryan was, therefore,
doing double duty.
Prior to the fourth liberty loan
campaign Dr. Bryan desired to step
aside but was prevailed upon to re
main in charge of affairs of the coun
cil while the drive was in progress,
Governor Alexander urged him to do
so and the executive committee of
the state council made a similar re
quest. Dr| Bryan consented to do
this and under his direction the state
and county councils gave valuable aid
to the loan drive.
Speaking of the action taken by
Dr. Bryan, Governor Alexander said:
"I appreciate the position which Dr.
Bryan finds himself confronted with
and while I regret to see him resign
BRYAN M ED
COMMISSIONER 'OF EDUCATION
GIVES UP CHAIRMANSHIP
OF DEFENSE COUNCIL
The following statement sent out
by the state council of defense in
regard to the resignation of Dr. E. A.
Bryan, as chairman of that body, will
be of interest in Moscow, where Dr.
Bryan is so well and favorably known.
The statement follows:
The Official Bulletin regrets to an
nounce the resignation of Dr. E. A.
Bryan as chairman of the state coun
cil of defense. Dr. Bryan is com
missioner of education of Idaho.
f
No One Can Read Statement Without Experi- „
encing a Feeling of Pride in the Part Idaho
Has Taken in the Large Affairs of the Nation
A
/ V
HE people are entitled to know the public record of any candidate who seeks
re-election, and the Evening Capital News now presents a statement of bills and
measures particularly advocated by Senator W. E. Borah while representing in *
part this state in the United States Senate. It includes only the more important matters. '
No one can read this statement without feeling a genuine pride in the part Idaho
has thus taken in the greater affairs of our country. The position of Senator Borah in
our national councils is secure. His opinions and views are sought by the great news
papers of our country and are listened to abroad. He stands among the acknowledged
leaders of American thought.
Moreover, the record discloses that he has at all times consistently stood, not for
any particular interest or class, but for the common good and welfare of all our people.
Thus the farmer, the business man, and the laborer alike have in Senator Borah
powerful champion and advocate as well as a state councillor.
An examination of the Senate records shows the following bills and measures of '
which Senator Borah has been the author or one of the principal advocates sincr /v,has
T
• * ■
y
%
r a
a
been in the Senate:
LAND LEGISLATION IN WHICH
IDAHO IS GREATLY INTERESTED
1. Author of the bill providing for
twenty million dollars loan to the recla
reclamation projects of the west! Out
of this fund the Arrowrock was built.
2 Author of the hill bringing the state
law from which it had- been previously
mation fund with which to complete the
of Idaho under the enlarged homestead
excluded.
3. Author of the bill shortening the
homestead period from five to three;
years and prescribing the amount of im
prqvements.
, 4. . Author of the bill providing for
the issuance of patent to homesteaders
and desert land entrymen on reclamation
projects at the end of the residence
P T° fl ; . , . T , •
a. Author of the amendment leaving
to the homesteader to determine for
himself whether he will prove up undei
the old or the new law regardless o
notice am l ection.
MATTERS RELATING PARTICU
EARLY TO LABOR
1. He took part in framing and fiuallj
in the passage of the employers' liability
bill.
„ TI r , • ■ ir -
2 He was one of the prme.pal framers
of the child labor bill in the District of
p 1 1 •
3 He was one of the four senators
in 1909 who began the agitation of the
in iyuy wno oegan me agiuuiun i u
amendment to the constitution, providing
for an income tax stating at the time
that if we are ever at war it would be
indispensable to have such a tax as time
lias proven.
4 He supported and voted for the
standardization of equipment bill, a bill
e r nS g es t0 ^ aPP,ia ' CeS ^
5 'In 1910 he reported out of the
• j- • „„„„ mp
judiciary committee and urged upon the
floor of the senate two important amend
ments to the employers' liability act.
6 In 1910 he supported and voted for
the'accident report bill necessary to the
execution of the employers' liability law.
7 In Tune 1910 he reported out of
J ' ' - an d took
the senate judiciary committee
charge of its passage in the sen.-*
bill pro ' A g for a federal corn
of worKi.. u's compensation,
8. In June, 1910, he ip,
lution providing forX
the working condit :
as chairman of the state council of de
fense, I believe he is doing the right
thing. Our relations since he has
been chairman of the council have
been the most friendly. I have reason
to appreciate the ability of Dr. Bryan
as directing head of the state council.
He has done a remarkable work and
his executive ability will be missed."
Much of the credit for bringing the
state council of defense organization
up to itg present high state of effici
ency until it ranks with the best in
the union, is due to Dr. Bryan. He
is an executive officer of exceptional
ability and demonstrated in many in
stances while chairman this fact.
Nothing was left undone by Dr. Bryan
to perfect the state, county and com
munity councils. There was organ
ized a war machine mat reached into
practically every school district in the
state. He is a gifted organizer, is
quick to grasp the importance of any
situation arising and swift to analyf^'
I it. He kept the council free from em
barrassing situations in carrying on
, war wor p anc ] inaugurated a strong
I poHcy to line the state solidly be .
hind the nation in solving a ll war
problems behind which he stood
fi rm iy #
T m* -»-» ^ , .
f ™ enc ?' present vice chairman
„ c ® uncll > " spoken of as prob
, . <r cesso î J- 0 Pf- Bryan. The
resignation of the latter as laid be
overnor Alexander is as fol
"Governor Moses Alexander, Boise,
Idaho.
"Dear Sir: It is with a feeling of
regret that I present my resignation
as member and chairman of the state
council of defense. I find the double
load of commissioner of education and
chairman of the state council of. de
fense a little too heavy and neither
can be neglected. Just in front of us
is the preparation of the budgets of
the six educational institutions for
the coming biennium and the reports
on these and the public schools for
the past biennium for the legislature,
"In the year during which I served
passed.
At the time this resolution was
introduced men were working in these
industries ten hours
a day and seven
to t "C constitution for the popular elec
ticl1 of United States senators ever re
ported from a committee of the senate,
an amendment which he managed on the
floor of the senate and which was passed
after some three years' consideration.
days a week.
9. He Reported the first amendment
10.
-. He introduced and had charge of
(he bill creating the federal children's
bureau,
In 1912 he supported and voted
f or the incorporation of the literacy test
in the immigration hill.
J 2 j n 1912 he voted for compensa
tion for injuries hill in the interest of
employees engaged in interstate com
merce - .
13 In May, 1912, he introduced and
t ook charge of the bill providing for an
e jght-hour day on government work
w f,i c h was passed and became a law.
^ introduced in the senate and
had charge of the same in that body a
Dill creating a department of labor and
making its head a member of the cabinet,
11 .
IS. In August, 1912. he introduced
and had reported to the committee a
bill proivding for eight hours *for dredge
.
16. He introduced the first résolu
tion providing for an investigation of the
conditions of labor in West Virginia
r: e i d c nnd -ifterwards became a
coal neias ana atterwaras pecame . d.
member of that investigating committee,
1. He was one of the advocates of the
right of our government. to arm neutral
vessels and the right of neutral citizens
to travel upon merchant vessels.
2 He was one of the signers of the
»ft ÄSedSÄ Ä
p f ev ented the passage of the bill to arm
1 ! I , 0
neutra ] vessels.
3 H t d for the declaration of
CU
< .
4- He stood vigorously against the
hill providing for a war committee which
it was believed would have the effect of
hampering the president in the manage
ment of the war.
5, He supported what is known as the
rman bill which enabled the presi
to reorganize the departments for
tore successful pp" r '' o f the
, It was
as chairman of the state council of
defense, that body has been organized,
thoroughly organized, county councils
have been formed in the forty-one
c'ounties of the state, excellent pro
gress has been made in the organiza
tion of auxiliary and community
councils of defense, and a vast amount
of war work has been accomplished.
Idaho has demonstrated that 'll* is
loyal to the heart, ready to do uts
full share, and it is today among the
best organized states
. in the union.
Permit me to thank you personally
for the uniform courtesy and staunch
support which you have given to the
council of defense. J
'Very sincerely yours,
"E. A. BRYA1
Commissioner of Educati
r
Latah County Records. V
Thursday, October 31, 1918.
W. D.—Mary E. Miller to Luther L.
YÿAsar, $10.000; SE 1-4 SWI4 SW 1-4
SE 1-4 3; NE 1-4 NW 1-4 NW 1-4 NE
1-4 10-41-5.
R. M.—Luther L. Vassar Mary E.
Miller, $9,000; due in five years; above.
Deed of Administrator.— In the matter
of the estate of William B. Troutner;
A. E-. Daily, administrator. Sold to L. C.
Hornby, $12 ; lot 4-7, H arvard.
W. D.—May J. Holton to L. M.
Kenns; $2,600; NW 1-4 NW 1-4 16-42-5
W.
H. M.— L. M. Kerns to May J. Holton,
$1,700: above.
Q. C. D.— H. P. Hull to Wm. Com-
nick, $50; tract in 19-38-2 W.
- Ü* -
Read The Daily Star-Mirror "Want
Ads."
5AVE SUGAR
TOR THE
MAN /
VTfOÀ
FIGHTS
41
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6. When the food administration bill
was before the
senate he offered an
amendment giving the president
to fix the
»
power
price of steel, cotton, farm
which amendment
adopted in substance, but afterwards
after a long discussion reconsidered and
defeated.
implements, etc.,
was
7. When the
espionage bill first
before the senate it had a clause
\ iding for an establishment of
came
pro
S "'P B le press,
censor
Senator .Borah at
position that this
violation of the first amendment to tl,„
constitution of h,» tv, , r '
against the liberty of^hforeswnd
freedom of speech. Débité nn™, . e
matter was intense and rinml nv.- K
period of some three months
. cl .' l , llsc was finally stricken out of he
bl11 -
8. As a member of the foreiim
tions committee he has sunno.rtpd tl,«
foreign policy of the president as it has
grown out of and developed in this
persistently and vigorously.
9. He has voted for and supported
all appropriations and bond
once tbok the
was in
war,
. .. j. - provisions
providing for the necessary funds with
which to prosecute the war.
10. He was one of the twelve spun fnr<;
who in 1917 began a vigorous figh in
TJnitorl *.u f 1C . 111
r " e unitea states senate for the taxing
of war profits to the extent of 80 per
cent. Since that time this policy has
been adopted as the policy of the
F 1 y
ernment
D- In j" 1 ' he initiated the
against profiteering and has followed it
up from that time to this. He has intro
duced two resolutions which
brou g bt , a report from the federal trade
treasuryThowLTthe'extenf e7the
Profiteering m this country. Upon these
reports are based the provision now
proposed in the revenue bill
P r °P osed ln tne re ' enu c bl[L
Arrowrock reservoir furnishes water
to more than a hundred thousand acres
of Iand . If Senator Borah had done
nothing else during his entire term than
0 provide the twentymilhon reclama
i on furtd, he would be, entitled to the
gov
have
undying gratitude of our people. It is
not likely many will forget that it was
the water from the Arrowrock reservoir
that twp years agosavetMh^Æ^jUj^
■ '_ _ _

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