OCR Interpretation


The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, November 04, 1918, Image 4

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1918-11-04/ed-1/seq-4/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

lystys
1Ü!
|U>
THE ONE
End and Aim at
CREIGHTON'S
is to provide the people of Moscow with the best
THINGS TO WEAR at the Lowest Price con
sistent with fair dealing. Just one price to all—
rich or poor—in town or out of town—old or young.
Just one price and that the very lowest. We are
fighting the profiteer with remarkable success, and
buyers have not been slow to take advantage of it.
If you have a
Coat or Suit
want yet unfilled it will mean dollars saved to sup
ply your wants here. Recent shipments makes the
picking good again for this week.
CREIGHTON'S
PÜ1
WRITES ABOARD SHIP
REV. JOSHUA JENSEN SENDS
GREETINGS TO MOSCOW
FRIENDS ACROSS PACIFIC
The Star-Mirror is in receipt of
the following letter from the Rev.
Joshua Jensen, a missionary who
served several years in China and is
now enroute to his field of labor after
taking a post graduate course at Yale.
He was here last summer and met
many old time friends. His letter
was written on board the steamship
Ecuador, enroute to China. It fol
lows;
"Oct. 11, 1918.
"Editor of the Star-Mirror, Mos
cow, Idaho.—Dear Sir: You were
very kind to me while in Moscow
this fall and I want to thank you for
the public welcome you extended to
me and the kind publicity you gave
my lectures and addresses. I desire
you that I appreciate it all.
We have surely had a strenuous
time since leaving Moscow. When
we arrived in San Francisco we found
that our passports had not turned up
up, nor any word of them. We were
to sail on the 21st and it was mid
night on the 19th before mine finally
came and even then my wife and boys
had been overlooked; and that in spue
of several letters and telegrams to
the state department about them.
Well I was in a fix. Then I remem
bered our good republican congress
man, Burton French and I was sure
he would not be too busy to give a
• fellow a lift where a reasonable and
legitimate thing was asked of him.
I sent him a long night letter setting
forth my plight and I had his reply
at 1:15 on the following afternoon
assuring me that he had taken the
matter up with the proper authorities
in Washington and that they were
wiring the 'Frisco representative of
the state department authority to
straighten the matter out, so that we
might get off. Well, I set about the
straightening out process and I am
now convinced that every one of those
poor clerks must be using their
eighteenth set of artificial fingers
for the amount of red tape they have
r
«
»■
SUCCESS
m
m
seldom comes to any business man without the aid of
a bank. A good, permanent .banking connection may
mean the difference between success and failure in
an enterprise. Establish your credit with a good
bank; it, will be a factor in your success. We want
to serve you.
i
at
Ü
Ü
The First National Bank
OF MOSCOW
36 Tears of Successful Banking.
W. L. Payne, President
J. S. Heokathosn, Cashier
to unravel with each case, and I was
nearly always the last of a long line,
was enough to not only wear out
fingers but hands and arms and souls
as well. But it was all necessary.
could see how each step would serve
as a trap to catch any hun who might
be trying to get out. I'm glad to see
our ports so carefully guarded. I saw
one doubtful character who had been
held up for several months.
"But we did get off. We got the red
tape all unwound at about 11:45 and
the boat was to start at 1:00.
"Thus far we have had an unevent
ful trip. I had my hands full the first
few days out of 'Frisco as I was the
least sea sick of the Jensen family.
"We had a pleasant stop in Hono
lulu. Saw a good deal of their won
. _
We wound up our stay in Hono
lulu with a visit to the old palace
which is now used as a U. S. govern
ment building.
derful mountain scenery and the surf
riders on the incoming breakers
the harbor waters with their ever
changing and wonderful colors. Then
we went to the aquarium where they
have several scores of odd and beauti
ful fish, including several devil fish,
all caught in Hawaiian waters. Then
we went and sat under a spreading
banyan tree and ate peanuts.
"One of the odd and striking sights
of the city was a grocery show win
dow filled with a large variety of
good things each connected by a rib
bon with the spot on a big map of
the U. S. from which they came.
forces F has rendered possible to our
people that tremendous development
! which impenshably revealed itself in the
wonderful achievements of this war.
"In the terrible storms of the four
years of war, however, old forms have
been broken up, not to leave their ruins
"Sincerely yours,
JOSHUA C. JENSEN."
THE KAISER GIVES
POWER TO PEOPLE
(Continued from page One.)
behind, but to make a place for a new
vital form.
"After the achievements of these times
the German people can claim that no
right which may guarantee a free and
happy future shall be withheld from
them.
"The proposals of the allied govern
ments which are now adopted and ex
tended owe their origin to this convic
tion. I, however, with my exalted allies
endorse these decision of parliament in
firm determination, so far as I am con
cerned, to cooperate in their full devel
opment, convinced that I am hereby pro
moting the weal of the German people.
"The kaiser's office is one of service
to the people. May, then, the new order
release all the good powers which our
people need in order to support the trials
which are handing over the empire and
with a firm step in the bright future
front the gloom of the present.
"Berlin, Oct. 28, 1918.
"WILHELM. R. L,
"Max. Prince of Baden."
Struggles Over the Kaiser.
PARTS. Nov. 3.—"There can be no
doubt," says the Temps, "that a great
struggle is going on around the German
emperor's person between the influences
which caused the war and wish to main
tain the old regime and the partisans
of a new regime, more or less demo
cratic. and of a peace for the purpose of
repairing Germany's strength.
"By returning to general headquarters
Emperor William seemed to show clear
ly that his supreme desire was not to
abdicate. So. the emperor's rescript
promises cooperation, not his resignation.
But parliamentary exigencies press upon
him, even amidst his staff which exhorts
him not to yield. Submission is not
sufficient—he is summoned with more
or less deference to resign."
AUSTRIA-HUNGARY
I
DUAL MONARCHY SIGNED AR
MISTICE AGREEMENT WITH
ITALIAN GENERAL SUNDAY
PARIS, Nov. 3.—(By the Associated
Press.) — Official announcement was
made here this evening that an armistice
has been signed with Austria.
Hostilities will cease at 3 o'clock Mon
day afternoon. The conditions of the
armistice will be published on Tuesday.
Official announcement of the signing
of the armistice reached the premiers
while they were in session in the apart
ment of Colonel House, President Wil
son's personal representative, this after
noon, and gave the greatest satisfaction.
It was arranged that the conditions
of the armistice would be made public
promptly.
The meeting of premiers and military
and naval representatives at the apart
ments of Colonel House today was a
continuance of the sessions previously
held. While the discussion was largely
informal it went over the whole range
of subjects.
The representatives were in full ac
cord on practically all the points treated. I a
The sessions will continue as the mo- IB
ment has not yet arrived for the taking ^
of a final decision on some of the most
important questions involved.
Premier Lloyd George, of Great
Britain and Premier Clemenceau of I
I
France left the conference together.
They exchanged friendly greetings on
the prompt signing of the Austrian ar
mistice and showed in their manner the
keen satisfaction they felt regarding the
progress of events.
Announcement by London.
LONDON, Nov. 3.—An armistice with
Austria was signed this afternoon by
General Diaz, the Italian commander
in-chief, according to an official an
nouncement made here this evening. The
text of the statment reads :
"A telephone message has been re
ceived from the prime minister in Paris
saying that news has just come that
Austria-Hungary, the last of Germany's
a nies, has gone out of the war.
"The armistice was signed by General
Diaz this afternoon and will come into
operation tomorrow at 3 o'clock. The
terms will be published on Tuesday."
Austria Announces the End.
VIENNA, Nov. 3, via London.—"In
the Italian theater of the war our troops
have ceased hostilities on the basis of
an armistice which has-been concluded,"
says the war office communication issued
today.
"The conditions of the armistice will
be announced in a later communication."
Be Clue to German Terms.
WASHINGTON, Nov. 3.—Armistice
terms which the Austrians have accepted
are expected here to furnish a clear in
dex to those which the supreme war
council at Versailles is preparing for
Germany. Consequently their publica
tion will carry greater significance than
otherwise would attach since the Aus
trian surrender had been discounted in
advance by the internal disintegration of
the dual monarchy and the collapse of
the Austro-Hungarian forces on the
Italian front.
Official announcement that the ar
mistice had been signed reached the state
department today. In making this
known, officals gave no indication of the
terms imposed, nor was there any ex
planation of why cessation of hostilities
had been delayed 24 hours or more after
the actual signing of the articles of sur
render. The generally accepted view,
however, seamed to be that it was de
sired to have virtually all Italian soil
freed of enemy troops before the Italian
armies were committed to end their
attacks upon the routed Austrian forces.
Military men said the terrils which
the supreme war council has prepared
would make it impossible for the Aus
trians to renew hostilities, probably'in
cluding the disarming of the enemy
troops and occupation of strategic points.
Some of these, namely, Trent and Triçst,
àlrtady have been occupied by Italian
and allied forces.
Free movement of the allied fbrééjs
through Austria to attack Germany from
the south should the supreme war com
mand decide such a stroke necessary-in
the future, also is expected to be stipit
lated. Unofficial reports from Vienna
today said the Germans were preparing
for such an attack.
The defection of Austria leaves Ger
many stripped of its last ally and most
the military men, both allied and
American, believe her capitulation will
follow soon after the terms from Ver
sailles are submitted.
Exchanges of views between Colonel
M. House, special representative of
the American government in France,
and the allied premiers continued today
Colonel House's residence in Paris,
and apparently the general terms for
Germany are not yet ready for submis
of
in
UfeU&UJ
Itlmms
/•
let
l'it
il'-Jii-Ml'-Jiipji
ns=ii
13£
*
A ,
DONT LOSE
>
YOUR VOTE!
■ 4
v
OUR SONS ARE IN FRANCE and we
should keep Idaho clean and intact until they return.
snl
if
m
i
m

: >
You Should Vote
m
%
t;
*
on all matters affecting State Government.
£
VOTE AGAINST CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION
And all Constitutional Amendments. We should not revise our
Constitution until the "Boys" get home. Let them have a finger
in that pie.
tj
A, S. LYON, President,
REPUBLICAN STATE HEADQUARTERS FOR NORTH
IDAHO, Moscow, Idaho
r
II
ft
sion to the allied military leaders. Col
onel House is keeping President Wilson
advised as to the progress of events.
Great importance is attached here
the course followed by the allied and
American governments in deferring
peace settlements with Austria, Turkey
and Bulgaria until Germany also shall
surrender or be crushed. This policy
counted upon to prevent any eleventh
hour attempt on the part of the Germans
to sow seeds of discord among the allies.
In view of the general situation, the
smashing Franco - American victories
north and west of Verdun are regarded
as significant. Unless an armistice inter
rupts, it is believed the thrust will be
pressed home relentlessly to cut the
German front in the west in half before
there is another halt.
Hotel Moscow Arrivals.
Saturday, November 2, 1918.
A. J. Hills, Butte; Paul Groitz, Seat
tle; F. E. Dolle and wife, Spokane;
E. B. Barber, Creston, B. C. ; Frank
Wearer, Palouse; J. N. Bittell, Chicago;
J. E. Lenane, Spokane ; B. E. Dimon,
Spokane; Amos A. Doyle, Spokane; D.
Winchell, Seattle; E. C. Lloyd, Spokane;
O, W. Kerr, Minneapolis ; J. A. Watson,
Spokane; W. J. Pochel, Moscow; John
L. Woody, Kendrick; G. M. Johnson and
wife, Palot Rock, Ore. ; Ida Russell, Pa
lot Rock, Ore.; L. Harvy, Johnson;
Adolph Wagner, Moscow; Miss Gufston,
Kendrick.
Sunday, November 3, 1918.
Frank Weaver, Palouse; J. W. Nichel,
Kamiah ; W. H. Shedd, St. Louis ; J.
Mills, Kamiah; W. F. Wilkins, Black
foot; G. C. Brown, Spokane: M. Brown,
Lewiston ; Nora L. Brown, Lewiston.
Brief Local News
The Star-Mirror is in receipt of a
letter from W. Leon Owings, son of
Mr. and Mrs. S. T. Owings, of Mos
cow, who is with the flying squadron
France. The letter has been badly
mutilated by the censor. That portion
it received by The Star-Mirror fol
lows :
'Somewhere in France,
"4th of Oct.
"Daily Star-Mirror, Moscow, Ida.—
Dear Sirs: Just a line to let you
know that I receive and thoroughly
digest one of the 'Good old Mirrors'
once in a while. They certainly
enjoyed by Chas. Grey, myself
few Latah' boys who are with us.
nothing like
are
and
There is
paper 'over here.'
"We are * * * back of the front
the home town
lines at present but expect to be fly
over the lines soon in the capacity
Aerial Gunners. Fritz comes over
often and pays us a visit. • • •
a while but his raids are • • •
"Hoping everything is running
smoothly in the locality, I am
"Yours truly,
"W. LEON OWINGS.
(Paid Advertising.)
Republican Ticket
U. S. Senator
(Long Term!
W. E. BORAH
U. S. Senator
(Short Term)
FRANK R. GOODING
Representative in Congress
(First District)
BURTON L. FRENCH
Justice of the Supreme Court
ALFRED BUDGE
Governor
D. W. DAVIS
Lieutenant Governor
C. C. MOORE
Secretary of State
ROBERT O. JONES
State Auditor
EDWARD G. GALLETT
State Treasurer
JOHN W. EAGLESON
Attorney General
ROY L. BLACK
Superintendent of Public Instruction
ETHEL E. REDFIELD
Inspector of Mines
ROBERT N. BELL
Judge of the District Court
EDGAR E. STEELE
State Senator
E. W. PORTER
State Representatives
(Vote for Three)
ALFRED S. ANDERSON
HOMER W. CANFIELD
C. J. HUGO
County Commissioner
(First District)
JOHN CONE
County Commissioner
( Second District)
ELMER M. PAULSON
County Commissioner
(Third District)
COLUMBUS CLARK
Clerk of the District Court and Ex
Officio Auditor and Recorder
HOMER E. ESTES
Sheriff
JOHN L. WOODY
County Treasurer and Ex-Officio Pub
lic Administrator and Tax Collector
IONA S. ADAIR
Probate Judge
ADRIAN NELSON
County Superintendent of Public
Instruction
LILLIAN M. SKATTABOE
County Assessor,
EMMET J. GEMMILL
For Coroner
. GLEN O. GRICE
County Surveyor
HARVEY J. SMITH
Prosecuting Attorney
JOHN NISBET
To- the Voters and Tax Payers of
Latah County:
One of the most important duties
of the citizens of Latah county
ing just been performed in raising its
quota of the Fourth Liberty Loan,
we are certainly all grateful. But
there are other duties which must be
met by the people of the county.
As chairman of the Republican or
ganization of Latah county I appeal
you one and all before casting your
ballot on November 6th, 1918, that
the Republican ticket care
give it due consideration.
hav
yon study
rally and
I point with pride to the conduct
of Latah county, its economical hand
ling by our county officials, an 1 call
your attention to the fact that iit is
the best governed county in the ïjtatq..
The following statement from ßyron
Defenbach & Sons, public accountants,
who have audited practically ((very
county in Northern Idaho, stanftg as
a strong testimonial to the officials -
now directly responsible for handling
the finances of Latah county, and
which statement appears in the Poca
tello Tribune under date of October
3, 1918.
"Comparing the various counties of
the state by sections from an account
ant's standpoint, the broad general
statement is made that the Northern
counties of Idaho are far superior to
those of the South, and Latah county
is pronounced to be the best governed
county in Idaho."
The governing power of Latah ■
county has been in the hands of He- ' A
publican officials for several ye^rs
last past, and our candidates nominftt
ed at the primary are known by Jjll
to be loyal citizens and thorough
capable to handle the affairs of til
county if elected.
Again asking your loyal suppôts
and favorable consideration, I a m
Respectfully yours, t/r • *
C. A. HAGAN, \ S
Chairman.
V
?<
I
!
?
9

VA
+ + + + + + + + + + + + + + +
MARKETS
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
The following market quotations
are the prices paid to the producer
by the dealer and are changed daily,
thus giving the public the
quotations in all classes of grain,
produce and meats.


"1
V
accurate
Hay and Grain
Wheat, Bluestem No. 1, bulk,
net, delivered to warehouses $2.02%
Wheat, Bluestem, No. 1, sacked
net, delivered to warehouses 2.11%
Wheat, Fortyfold, No. 1, bulk,
net, delivered to warehouses 2.02%
Wheat, Fortyfold, No. 1, sTced;
net, delivered to warehouses 2.11%
Wheat, White Club, No. 1 bulk,
net, delivered to warehouses 2.00%
Wheat, White Club, No. 1, sTced
net, delivered to warehouses 2.09%
Wheat, Red Russian, No. 1 bulk
net, delivered to warehouses 1.97 %
Wheat, Red Russian, No. 1 aTc'd
net, delivered to warehouses 2.06%
No. 1 Feed Oats sacked, per
hundred ...
No. l Timothy Hay....
White Beans, jf»«jr pound
Produce.
.*
• v m
*
1
; 3.16
• 134.00
. .08%
t
k
Eggs, per doz. ..
Butter, creamery, per lb.
Butter, ranch, ^per lb.
Potatoes, per cwt..
Young chicken^"per lb....
Hogs, live wt, light, per lb
Old roosters, per lb...
Hogs, dressed, kéavy, per lb... 19 at 20c
Hogs, dressed, light, per lb.,[email protected]
Veal, live wt, per lb.6 at 8c
Veal, dreased, per [email protected]
Spring Lambs, pier
Mutton, per lb. ..
....50c
....66c
60c
$ 1.00
15c
16c
06c
4.
) ■
(■i ■'
f *
lb
10c
6 at 8c

xml | txt