OCR Interpretation


The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, November 11, 1918, Image 2

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1918-11-11/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

The DAILY STAR-MIRROR
Published every evening except Sun
day, at Moscow, Idaho.
GEO. N. LAMPHERE, Publisher.
The Official Newspaper of the City
Moscow.
Entered as second-class matter Oct.
16, 1911, at the postoffice of Moscow,
Idaho, under the Act of Congress
March, 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Deliverd by carrier to any part of city:
Per Month .
Three Months.
Six Months.
One Year.
60c
.$1.60
2.76
6:00
By Mail
{outside of city and on rural routes):
Per Month . .
Three Months
Six Months .
One Year ...
40c
$1.15
2.25
4.00
The (Weekly) Idaho Post:
r
$1.50
Per Year
Member of the Associated Press.
The kaiser is probably beginning to
regret that he ordered the sinking of
the Lusitania.—San Francisco Exam
iner.
»3. IS?
A Rutherford, N. J., boy named Jones
has been decorated three times for
bravery at the front, and like his name
sake, John Paul, he has only begun to
fight.—New York Telegraph.
»3 SS, ^
It is to be regretted that some young
girls are hanging around the soldiers'
barracks in a way lacking of good de
corum. The parents of these girls should
know where girls of such tender years
and what they are doing. It has
been suggested that a woman should be
appointed on the police force to take
care of these girls who have not arrived
at years of discretion.
Sr fan Sr
The kaiser has had all along six un
injured sons, hut the president has just
damaged them considerably. — Minne
apolis Journal.
The prince of Rumania says he won't
give up his wife for a throne. At the
present values of European thrones, we
should credit him with a glimmering of
intelligence.—Cleveland Plain Dealer.
Mg Rr,
Even though Frank R. Gooding may
' : have been defeated for the U. S. senate,
the loyal men and women of Idaho, who
believe in the application of safe and
sound and practical methods in the
affairs of government, are indebted to
him above all others for the destruction
' of the nonpartizan league in the state
■ of Idaho. He has torn off their mask
and they now stand revealed in their
true light. He has dealt the league a
■< mortal blow.—Plummer Express.
*8 Ms Sa
JT^A POLITICAL CLOSED SEASON.
,V Election is over and if is too early
to begin pulling wires for the presiden
tial contest in 1920 to the exclusion of
1 all other business. Consequently the
are
•X.
i ■
4 politicians will be retired for a season.
, ! It is fair to presume that most people
are satisfied with the result of Tuesday's
voting. It could not he otherwise in a
country where the majority rules.—Salt
Lake Trihune.
WHY DON'T SHE?
Oh, Idaho, my Idaho, I am sure in
love with you; With your tawny hills,
your splashing rills, your woodland
aisles where sunbeams filter through !
I've wandered far from where you are—
I've chased around a lot; but there is
no place with the charm and grace that
you, my Love, have got ! Where the
Salmon glides and the Lemhi slides my
heart with rapture thrills; when I stroll
along and absorb their song my Joy
swells up and spills! Where the Tetons
tower in the evening hour and the rose
tints flood each peak, I gaze in awe.
while my gum I chaw, and darned if I
can speak ! Where the Old Snake roars
over chasm floors and Shoshone makes
her jump, I just gasp for breath on that
brink of death while I feel my gizzard
thump ! Where the Sawtooths climb to
heights sublime and Old Hyndman lifts
his head I stand and stare at the mar
r
Mi
Ü
SUCCESS
•a
eg
seldom comes to any business man without the aid of
a bank. A good, permanent banking connection may
mean the difference between success and failure in
an enterprise. Establish your credit with a good
bank; it will be a factor in your success. We want
to serve you.
ü

The First National Bank
OF MOSCOW
36 Tears of Successful Banking.
J. S. Hbckathorn, Cashier
W. L. Payne, President
tIu ' re ,i " > oud ,hink tliat 1 was
dead: Where the Payettes glint and
these brown eyes .-.quint at the sun-gems
on their breast 1 just dream away
through night and day and rest and rest
Where the St. Joe curls and softly purls
as she slips out to the sea, I drift and
drift through the forest rift while fancy
ranges free ! Where the Coeur d'Alene
spreads her liquid plain in the twilight
afterglow there's a call I hear 'bout
twice a year and you bet your boots
go. Oh, Idaho, dear Idaho, with your
«f
of
laurel green, your golden sheen over
fields arid plains and mountain camps,
you're as fair, my love, as the stars
above—but why in hell don't you buy
those Stamps ?
•EARL WYMAN BOWMAN.
1^,
REPUBLICANS CAN FRANK R.
GOODING.
Idaho was never in such danger, it
appears, from the nonpartisan league
menace as it was feared it was immedi
ately before the election. However,
these sporadic attacks are some like the
influenza epidemic. There is good cause
for alarm with their appearance and they
sometimes do a lot of harm before they
have run their course.
To Frank R. Gooding, more than to
any one person or agency, the state has
to give thanks for making the rough and
tumble fight of a rough and tumble
fighter at a time when a rough and
tumble fight was the only way out of
it. It was a good thing that Frank
Gooding wanted to go to the United
States senate this year. Otherwise we
might have "pussyfooted" the campaign
through, with William E. Borah safely
returned to the United States senate,
with the state ticket skinned a thousand
miles and the affairs of state in the
hands for the next two years of Town
ley. McKaig, Schultz and the political
J. Rufus Wallingsfords with their Indian
sagwa cure all sold out to the state and
with new and startling samples on the
way from North Dakota for the political
ills of 1920. "Fighting Frank" went to
bat and was a "fighting fool" for about
six weeks. His work wasn't particularly
beautiful. Frank-with a pitchfork in his
hand and a load of fertilizer to load
isn't any artistic creation of the poets.
But there was no need of any poets:
somebody had to get in and do a big
day's work and when it comes to po
litical poetry, the state is pretty well to
do with the Honorable William Edgar
who can flay the profiteer and pull the
tailfcathers from the national bird and
get away with it on the front page of
a New York daily any day that he is
feeling just right for the flight. Some
body had to go after Scholtz in Scholtz'
style. Somebody had to "rip off the
hide" and stand on the causeway and
shout the alarm and incidentally heave
a few large shovelfuls of real muck.
Frank did it with his old-time energy.
If anybody saved the day for Idaho it
which he named for himself and who
has otherwise left his
name forever
linked with Idaho's history.
If incidentally Frank Gooding has at
tained his lifetime aspiration and gone
to the United States senate nobody will
In fact they will be glad of it.
care.
Senator Gooding will be energetic and
watchful and he'll work hard for Idaho.
And nobody down at Washington, think
ing perhaps they have found a "new one"
from the wild and woolly, will sell him
any gold bricks.
And we will all give Mr. Gooding the
only meed of praise he wants in the few
brief words, "he saved the state."—
Pend d'Ofeille Review.
PB I® *1
The county campaign just closed was
by all odds the cleanest that has been
waged for years. There were no per
sonalities or mud-slinging—the candi
dates treated each other in a gentleman
ly way from start to finish. Early in
the campaign the newspapers of the
country agreed to keep out of their col
umns everything nasty and scurrous,
and, like the Star-Mirror, we sure be
lieve this helped to keep things clean.
We talked with candidates of all parties
before the election, and heard not
-ingle derogatory remark from any
them concerning their opponents. The
state campaign, though, was hitter.—
Deary Press.
!
I
MUST BE ON GERMAN SOIL.
The presence of allied troops
Germany is the paramount condition
for the fulfilment of peace conditions.
This is psychologically necessary to
allied victory. Dr. William Mueslon,
former director of Krupps, considers
that the German people cas not be
healed of their aggressive mentality
until they have actually undergone
the expiation of their crimes. Am
bassador Morganthau, whose insight
has been of such great value and who
is well acquainted with Germany, has
declared that the presence of the al
lied armies on the soil of Germany
was absolutely necessary for her de
feat.—New York World.
* I ii iMin WÊÊtBSSSSSSm »
Weather—Idaho—Tonight, fair and
colder, Tuesday, fair.
R. H. Barton left this morning for
Coeur d'Alene.
Walter Cochran came to Moscow
this morning from Juliaetta.
Mrs. Sig Coleman was in Pullman
Sunday to visit Miss Helen Savage.
Mrs. Hershel Strohm has been visiting
her mother, Mrs. Cowgill, of Juliaetta.
Mrs. Albert Vennigerholz is visiting a
few days in Lewiston.
Miss Olive Frazier was a passenger
to Lewiston Sunday.
Ivan Williamson went to Spokane
Sunday on a business trip.
Mrs. L. Nettleton of Palouse is
visiting with Mrs. Johnson of the In
wood hotel.
Mrs. C. A. Christenson of route 5,
gave a sack of apples and four quarts
of cherries to the soldiers' mess fund.
Robert Cozier of the S. A. T. C., who
is a victim of the influenza at his
mother's home, is improving.
Lee Sinclair, second foreman of the
cedar yards at Bovill, accompanied
by his wife, is visiting in Moscow
at the home of Mrs. D. T. Gustin.
Alvah Strong of Cora went to his
home this morning, after attending
to his questionnaire in Moscow.
Mrs. W. S. Fleet of Spokane, has
been visiting her husband, who is
working for Witter company.
Miss Grace Ball, commercial teach
er of the university, has received
news of the serious illness of her
father and sister.
Mrs. H. Eutsler of South Almond
street left. Sunday for Prosser, Wash.,
called by the death of her grandson,
Claude Kearns, of blood poisoning.
Miss Eva Longstreet of Lewiston, who
has been visiting Miss Lily Gustafson,
left for her home Sunday. She was ac
companied by Miss Gustafson.
The committee for the combined war
work campaign are authorized to accept
Liberty bonds at par value as subscrip
campaign.
Mrs. J. Bankert of Spokane has
been visiting her parents, Mr. and
Mrs. Gentry Rushing. Mr. Rushing
Is the furniture man at Davids'
Mrs. A. L. Sprouse has received
word from France that her son, Alex,
has been wounded but not seriously
Alex left Moscow in April and has
been over the top three times.
Mr. and Mrs. James Baumgartner
returned today from Aurora, Illinois,
where they spent the summer with
their daughter and husband, Dr. and
Mrs. Huff.
Wilton Snowden and family have
moved back to Moscow from Juliaetta
where they have been living for a
few months. Mr. Snowden is in the
employ of the Standard Lumber com
pany.
Mrs. Geo. W. Shepherd, who has been
visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. H.
Hill, was called to Great Falls, Mont.,
by the illness of her husband, who had
taken a relapse from an attack of influ
enza.
Miss Helen Savage, who has been in
Pullman for the past year, has been
quite ill of influenza and pneumonia,
but is now recovered. Her mother, Mrs.
Savage, of Moscow, is with her and both
expect to return to Moscow the latter
part of the week.
M. C. Biglow died Saturday even
ing at the home of his daughter, Mrs.
Henry Lawrence, of a complication
of diseases due to old age. Mr. Big
low is recently from Whitmore, Al
berta. The body will be taken to
Spooner, Wisconsin, accompanied by a
son.
E. O. Nord of the First National bank,
has accepted the position of assistant
cashier of the Commercial State bank at
Oakesdale. Mr. and Mrs. Nord will be
leaving Moscow about November 17.
Mrs. E. Delaney has been visiting in
Lewiston for several days.
L. F. Parsons was called to Weippe
today on account of the death of "Dad"
Cole, one of the pioneers of Idaho. Mr.
Cole passed through the Palouse country
before there was a town at Spokane or
Moscow, coming to the country with the
first rush of miners of the Pierce City
district.
We at home took the opportunity to
celebrate the whipping of the kaiser.
Now let us give Our Boys who did the
whipping an opportunity to celebrate by
providing them with Salvation Army
doughnuts and pies, and the wholesome
pleasures provided by the Y. M. C. A.,
Y. W. C. A., K. of C. Jewish Relief,
Your subscription to the United
etc.
War Fund Campaign is for that purpose.
Tire work of Kaiser Bill is over, but
that of Unde Sam has but began. Uncle
Sam and his boys have put an end to
autocracy. Bolshevicism would now like
to have its fling. This hard-headed
monster 4s yet to be disposed of before
Our Boys will come marching home.
Let us stay by them until they finish
their task. Subscribe trf UnifFd" War
Fund 1 Campaign, ; :
IlfinT TUAài Ull T TLJC
a |f| U II L I 111111 IIALl I ML
UfllDI D iàiUDI UCfl
| M V MI TlU
COUNTRIES AT WAR WITH GER
MANY WHICH WILL BE REP
RESENTED AT PEACE TABLR
Almost all of the great nations of the
earth were fighting Germany,
country started the war in conjunction
with Austria, on July 28, 1914, and
declarations of war by Germany against
other countries or by other countries
against Germany came thick and fast,
then, slowed down, to l>c renewed spas
modically during the first three years
of the war. Austria was the first coun
try to declare war and Germany was
the second. Panama was the last of the
nations to declare war on Germany, her
declaration having been made on De
cember 10, 1917.
That
TROY HAS MONSTER
CELEBRATION TODAY
More than 2,000 persons joined in
the wildest celebration the town of
Troy has ever known today. All busi-
ness was suspended and the afternoon
given over to celebrating the close of
the war. The finest parade ever seen
in Troy was headed by "Uncle Sam''
with "General Pershing" dragging
the kaiser through the streets and the
effigy was burned later while 2,000
enthusiastic people yelled themselves
hoarse. Although business is closed
the merchants and citizens are feeding
everybody who will accept, popcorn,
peanuts and other confections and
every man who wants to smoke has
a free cigar. Troy never does any-
thing in a half-hearted way and the
celebration today is a record breaker.
The Star-Mirror furnished the people
of Troy with the term« of the armis-
tice which were read at a great meet-
ing where patriotic speeches were de-
livered and patriotic music played and
patriotic songs were sung.
- m -
German's New National Anthem.
It is said that Germany has adopted
the good old Methodist hymn : "I Sur
render All" as the national anthem.
While not popular, the new song is said
to have been sung first by the kaiser
and then by his dupes when they' learned i
the armstice terms.
.
*
m
***************
MARKETS ♦
The following market quotations
are the prices paid to the producer
by the dealer and are changed daily,
thus giving the public the accurate
quotations in all classes of grain,
produce and meats.
Hay and Grain
Wheat, Bluestem No. 1, bulk,
net, delivered to warehouses $2.02%
Wheat, Bluestem, No. 1, sacked
net, delivered to warehouses 2.11%
Wheat, Fortyfold, No. 1, bulk,
net, delivered to warehouses 2.02%
Wheat, Fortyfsld, No. 1, sited,
net, delivered to warehouses 2.11%
Wheat, White Club, No. 1 bulk.
net, delivered to warehouses 2.00%
Wheat, White Club, No. 1, a'ked
net, delivered to warehouses .2.09%
+.
Wheat, Red Russian, No. 1 bulk
net, delivered to warehouses 1.97%
Wheat, Red Russian, No. 1 sit'd
net, delivered to warehouses 2.06%
No. 1 Feed Oats sacked, per
DR. J. J. HERRINGTON
Office over Willis' Drug Store
Phone 346
Phone 187R
Orland 8e Lee
ATTORNEYS and COUNSELORS AT LAW
Practice in District, State, Federal Courts
Office: First National Bank Bids?.
MOSCOW, IDAHO
FOR FIRST CLASS SHOE
REPAIRING
go to
J. N. FRIEDMAN
HARNESS SHOP
JOHN W. STEVENSON, M. D.
Eye, Ear, Nose and Throaf
Glasses Fitted
Office of Dr. Aspray, 303 3rd Aveu
Phone 177
FINEST LINE OF HIGH GRADE
WOOLENS. YOUR INSPECTION
SOLICITED
O. H. SCHWARZ, Tailor.
J. A. McDANICL
Moscow. Idaho
Dentist
Phone 229
LATAH COUNTY
TITLE & TRUST COMPANY
Abstracts of Title Conveyancing
Mortgage Loans
Them yean Insurance A g e ncy
Fire Insurance, Automobile and
Plate Glass Insaraaca, Fidelity and
Casualty Bonds
J. G. Vennigerholz, Pray.
Moscow, Idaho.

hundred
No. 1 Timothy Hay.$34.00
08%
3.16
White Beans, per pound
Produce.
Eggs, per doz.
Butter, creamery, per lb.. .
Butter, ranch, per lb.
Potatoes, per cwt.
Young chickens, per lb.15c
Hogs, live wt,, light, per lb
Old roosters, per lb-
Hogs, dressed, heavy, par lb.. . [email protected]
Hogs, dressed, light, per lb.. . 19(a)20c
Veal, live wt., per lb.
Veal, dressed, per lb....
Spring lambs, per lb. ...
Mutton, per lb.
66c
. ...60c
80c
16c
•Sc
. .6 at
[email protected]
9c
6<2)7c
YOUR
MONEY
Draws • interest when
deposited in this bank.
It earns nothing when
carried around in your
pocket.
FIRST TRUST
& SAVINGS BANK
Inland Market
10,000 chickens
wanted. Highest
market price paid.
Monuments
THE MOSCOW MARBI.f.
WORKS
George H. Moody, Proprietor
Has the finest line of MensmenU
and all Kinds of Marble Work to
be found in the Inland Empire
PRICES REASONABLE
See Our Work Before Ordering
Victrolas and
Victor Records
Sherf ey's Book Store
4
!
J
I
Moscow, Idaho

«
If it's New We Are Sore the
First to Have It
*
+
t
Hotel Moscow
V
t
TOM WRIGHT, Prop.
v
*
-r
*
Thoroughly Modern *
FIRST CLASS GRILL
AUTO BUS AT ALL TRAINS +
r — ? ~ 1 —t—■ T t J- ;
?
$
*
You will find you save morel
and live better if you trade at]
the I
THIRD STREET
MARKET
CHICKENS, GEESE, DUCKS
AND HIDES WANTED |
L. M. KITLEY
PHONE 2481
CLASSIFIED ADS
HELP WANTED—Female
GIRL WANTED—STAR HOTEL.
33-38
WANTED — COMPETENT GIRL
for general housework. Mrs. Geo.
Weber. Phone 62J; corner 1st and
Van . Bu rt>i.,— —-—— 35-tf.
SITUATION WANTED—Male
WNATED—FURNACE TO EIRE OR
janitor work ; colored man. Call Bob
at the Pastime.
38-40
FOR RENT—Rooms >
m
FOR RENT —A ROOM WITH OR
without sleeping porch ; hot qrfd cold
••ater ; modern conveniences ; priae
tnabe. 425 East Third St
- qubart.
rea
'Mrs. D.
13tf
FOR RENT — 1 HOUSEKEEPING
suite; also sleeping room: GaH
106W. 317 South Jefferson.
37-48
FOR RENT—FURNISHED APAHT
ments and furnished rooms at
Eggan's apartments. Phone 206H.
231-tf
FOR RENT—ONE LARGE 3-ROOM
apartment, $16; one 3-room apart
ment, slightly smaller, $12; one
2-room apartment, $10; one 2-room
apartment, $9; two furnished rooms,
$7. 310 South Lilly. Phone 338.
29-tf
FOR TRADE
WANTED—TO EXCHANGE ONE
two bottom 14-inch gang plow for
three befttom. Phone 9251. J. H. Dye.
289-tf
FOR RENT—Houses f
FOR RENT—A 7-ROOM MODERN
house, close in. C. H. Patten. 31-43
FOR RENT—AN 8-ROOM MODERN
house near the domitory. Phone 170J.
Mrs. John Shannon.
3» i
FOR RENT—2-ACRE TRACT WITH
5-room house, cheap. Phone 290R.
__ _ 32t£
FOR SALE—-Poultry
FOR SALE—FULL BLOODED S. C.
White Leghorn Cockerels. Phone
897X1
35-41
FOR SALE—Livestock
PIGS FOR SALE. PHONE 913X5.
35-41
W ANTED—M iscellaneous
WANTED—GOOD LIVE DEALER
to sell the best truck on the market
Can make deliveries 1 to 5 tons. Write
Rochester Motor Co., 1012 Sprague
Ave.. Spokane, Wash.
235-tl
WANTED TO RENT—AN OFFI«E
desk. Telephone 352.
291-tf
FOR SALE—Real Estate
FOR TRADE — IMPROVED TWO
acres for small car. Phone 290R. 31tf
FOR SALE—A 5-ROOM MODERN
residence; good cellar and garage. -
Phone 263H. Fred Stone.
16-tf
FOR SALE—8-ROOM MODERN
residence ; choice location, corner lot,
garage, etc. Phone 267Y. Sam Silvey.
2SS-tf.
FOR SALE —HOUSE AND LOT,
corner First and Polk Sts. Inquire i*
244tf
Mrs. Wm. Arnett.
FOR SALE — 80 ACRES THREE
miles east of Moscow ; house and barn.
Write E. R. Fuller, Lewiston, Idaho, or
see N. G. Gilbertson, adjoining farm. 6tf
HOMESTEAD RELINQUISHMENT
Chris Anderson wagon.
35-40
for sale,
shop.
FOR SALE—Miscellaneous
FOR SALE —S-PASSENGER FORD
(1918) like new, $500. Dr. Stevenson.
33-39
FOR SALE — A RIDING .AND
driving horse; gentle; children been
driving it to school ; also good single
harness. Inquire A and Lincoln, No.
37-38 ,
823.
FOR SALE—24 HEAD SHROPSHIRE 1
sheep. Write A. E.^Alexander.''Phone
Farmer 942K5.
32tf
6
/tpLINE - KNIGHT 7-PASSENGER f
touring car, in good condition, for sale
r trade. Moscow Auto & Supply Cq.
283tf
FOR SALE—1 DEERING BINDER;
sell for cash or trade in stock. M. J.
Schu, Moscow, Idaho. Rt. 3.
244tf
SELDEN TRUCKS SOLD ON DE
ferred payment plan. Write Rochester
Motor Co.. 1012 Sprague Ave., Spo
kane, Wash.
235-tf
FOR SALE OR TRADE—1918 BUICK „
"4," A-1 condition. Phone 189N even
34-40
mgs.
CASH REGISTER, PRACTICALLY
new, less than half price. Phone
34-39
32.
GOOD BOYS' OVERCOAT; ALSO
several suits made up, for sale, cheap.
3S-4Î
Schwarz, the Tailor.
FOR SALE—1 LEATHER LOUNGE,
1 bookcase, 1 oak chiffonier, 1 oak
table, 2 mattresses. 2 oak rockers. 1
bird's eye maple bedstead, 3 crocks, 1
720 Idaho street.
42tf
woven wrie spring.
Phone 274L.
MISCELLANEOUS
WILLIAMSON IS IN THE MAR
ket for 30 to 50 tons of Alfalfa
32-tf *
Hay; 10 tons Timothy.
WANTED—10 GOOD MILK COWS;
must be fresh or coming fresh
soon. Holstein or Durham stock'only
considered. Must not be over 5 years \
old. Apply to N. Williamson. 32-tf
THOSE WISHING ODD JOBS DONE 4.
phone Ray Stevens, c-o Plummer's
Cafe. 26-tf

xml | txt