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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, November 13, 1918, Image 2

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1918-11-13/ed-1/seq-2/

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DAILY STAR-MIRROR
iblished every evening except Sun
day, at Moscow, Idaho.
GEO. N. LAMPHERE, Publisher,
Deliverd by carrier to any part of city:
jpJPer Month .»V'PS
Six Months . 2.75
One Year. 5.00
2.25
The Official Newspaper of the City
Moscow.
Entered as second-class matter Oct.
16, 1911, at the postoffice of Moscow,
Idaho, under the Act of Congress of
March, 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
By Mail
(outside of city and on rural routes):
Per Month ..
Three Months
Six Months .
One Year . ..
40c
$1.15
4.00
The (Weekly) Idaho Post:
Per Year
$1.50
Member of the Associated Press.
GERMANS DESERVE NO PITY.
The German people deserve no pity
and certainly are not entitled to assist
ance from the United States or the
Allied nations. It is likely true that star
vation stares them in the face. But they
fought the United States and her Allies
until the very last minute—fought until
11 o'clock Monday forenoon—fought for
the kaiser who had abdicated Saturday
morning and fled from Germany Satur
day afternoon.
howl now and tell of their starving con
dition. Of course they lay the blame for
all their misery on the kaiser and the
war lords whom they followed blindly
as long as they had any hope of victory.
The German people were certainly in
hearty sympathy with the kaiser in his
plans to extend Germany's borders by
* conquest and boasted of their new terri
tory when Belgium, France and Serbia
were outraged.
It was the German people, the Ger
man men and women, especially the wo
men, who followed thê British, Belgian,
and French prisoners who were captured
in the early part of the war, hurling
sticks and stones and abuse at them—
calling them "vile English swine" and]
spitting in their faces when occasion
offered.
It was these same German
women
who endured hardships
and suffering to help the kaiser murder
who gave their husbands, their sons and
their brothers,
and rob the people of Belgium, France,
Serbia and Russia, ft was these same
"gentle dames" of Germany, now said
to be starving, who submitted to all
manner of privations and suffering to
help win the war—for what? For Ger
man aggrandizement—for the extension
of German trade and to make the kaiser,
the greatest murderer the world has
known, more powerful.
It was these same "gentle dames" and
their husbands and brothers and sons
■who helped to plan to have Japan and
Mexico attack, conquer and divide the
United States between them. How these
"starving millions" of which Mr. Rollf
tells us in his plea for food, would have
rejoiced had the German plan to con
quer and divide the United States be
tween Japan and Mexico succeeded.
How they would have rejoiced had Am
ericans been reduced to starvation
through the scheming of the kaiser,
How much help would the United
States have received from Germany,
Were Americans starving and if Ger
many had plenty? How much help did
starving Belgium get from her neighbor,
Germany, when that country had #ut
taged, robbed and ravished her?
The United States had to send food
the for
any
Never A Night Before Away
From Home
By Bruce Barton
The whole town was gathered on the platform
that morning to see the train pull out—men and
women and children, waving and cheering and
trying hard to keep on smiling through their
tears.
Out of the car windows leaned the boys to
wave a last good-bye.
Jyst average, clear-eyed country town boys;
twenty of them altogether. And seventeen of
them had never slept a night away from home
before.
They are dwelling in a strange land tonight,
whose language they cannot understand.
But across the mud and the snow a light
gleams warm from a hut on the edge of the
town, and inside good cheer and happiness are
ready for whoever will come in to claim them.
Friendship dwells in the hut; keep its warm
fires burning bright this winter. Let it he per
fectly clear to the men over there that you have
not forgotten.
:o the men that only a little while ago were
boys who had never slept a night away from
home.
This space contributed by
Frank Kelly, Jeweler
mans sunk the ships containing that
food.
i
Pa »*
IE GERMANY HAD WON.
It is certain that the terms which the
:
I
allies will force Germany to accept
the final peace settlement will be severe
in the extreme, and it is equally certain
that whatever German government may
then exist will squeal about them.
Whatever the final terms may be,
though, the people of the allied countries
j will probably feel that they are not
quite severe enough, for on everv hand
thcrc ,s r '-'8 rct t,lat the enemy did not
continue fighting until we could carry
the war into his own territory.
Denied this possibility of giving mili
tary punishment to the Hun on his own
soil, the allies will exact the greatest
possible measure of retribution for
wrongs done, and the greatest possible
number of guarantees for future good
behaviour, bi\t whatever our terms may
be they will be just, though stern.
But if Germany had won ! The world
knows what kind of peace terms would
have been imposed. The kaiser himself
boasted that the full cost of the war
would be levied against "the defeated
foe." He declared that the "conquered
nations will have to drag the leaden
weight of indemnity debts through gen
erations to come."
The world knows the kind of terms
the Germans imposed upon Russia and
upon Rumania. The terms which the
severe,
when Germany squeals she can be quick
ly silenced by an exhibition of the trea
ties of Brest-Litovsk and Bucharest.—
Boise Statesman.
isa te ns.
Pullman is "all torn up" over the ex
pose of a Spokane citizen whose boy
died in the Pullman S. A. T. C. The
boy's father gave an account of the treat
ment he and his boy received at Pull
man and claimed there is jealously be
tween the army surgeons there as
who is the ranking surgeon and that
quarrels among doctors and army offi
cers goes on while boys die of influ
enza and neglect. The story was pub
lished in Sunday's Spokesman-Review
an ,i filled more than half a page of that
paper,
Denials, counter charges and
signed articles and interviews from
Pullman citizens only add to the scandal.
an alarming death rate,
there being 48 deaths there in a short
Pullman had
time. The charges made by the Spo
kane man ought to he thoroughly inves
tigated. Tf they arc true some one ought
to be severely punished,
charges he has made against some of
the doctors are true tliey should be de
nied the right to practice. The matter
should not be covered up by denials of
interested parties.
Tf half the
Monday night Dr. E. H. Lindley came
to The Star-Mirror office and secured
a number of copies of the evening paper
containing the report of the surrender
of Germany. He took these, personally,
to the hospitals where S. A. T. C. men
are confined and asked the nurses to
read the news to the boys. Truly a
humanitarian and Christian act. Dr.
Lindley regards every boy here as a
father regards a son and his work for
them is truly grand. No father could
do more for his sons than he does for
the boys.
Sheriff Campbell says he knows about
bow the kaiser and several others of
Europe who have lost thrones recently
feel about it, yet be would not care to
trade places with any of them. Jap is
right. He still has the respect of the
people and is an American citizen, which
Incidently Sheriff Campbell
has two sons in the army who did their
"bit" to help dethrone Kaiser Bill and
several other crowned heads of Europe,
f- "■.
1 he boys from "over there" will soon
be coming back and when they all get
home and are furnished a list of those
who refused to do their duty in helping
with Liberty loan, Red Cross, Y. M.
C. A., K. of C. and other funds, we pre
dict that those people who failed to do
their duty will find this an unpleasant
place to dwell. The boys will not for
get who were the slackers and they will
not let the slackers forget, either.
country.
The defeat of the German army began
on July 15 at Chateau Thierry, where
the American soldiers cut three crack
divisions of the kaiser's army to pieces
in three days of fighting. The retreat
began July 18 and ended Nov. 11. The
American soldiers started it.
Latah county raised $903,500 for the
fourth Liberty loan. It is now asked to
raise $22,000 to provide reading matter,
homes and comforts for the boys who
whipped the kaiser's army. Latah coun
ty is not going to fail. The money must
be raised this week.
s (a ä
Senator Borah evidently believed that
the opposition of the woman suffrage
leaderswould cut little ice in Idaho. Com
plete returns from the recent election
show that Senator Borah made a good
guess.
r ft fs
THE "FLU."
When your hack is broke and your eyes
are blurred,
And .your shin hones knock and your
tongue is furred.
And your tonsils squeak and your hair
gets dry,
And you're doggone sure that you're
going to die,
But you're skeered yon won't and afraid
yon will,
Just drag to bed and have your chill,
And pray the Lord to sec you through,
For you've got the "Flu," boy.
You've got the "Flu."
B® I« I«
COACH EDMUNDSON TO
INSTRUGIATPRINCEION
FORMER IDAHO MAN CALLED
TO INSTRUCT IN BAYONET
DRILL
A telegram for Clarence S. Edmund
son, who was in Texas, was received at
the Western Union Telegraph Company
here from the adjutant colonel, stating
that he was to report at Princeton Uni
versity, November 10, to act as instruc
tor in bayonet drill andd intensive phy
sical training.
QUOTATIONS
We are paying following prices f.o.b.
Spokane for week ending Nov. 16.
1918.
Butter Fat .
Hens, 4 lbs. and over, alive
Hens, smaller .
Old Roosters .
Springs, 2Vz and over ..
Ducks .
Geese .
Veal, No. 1, dressed.
Hides .
63c
22c
19c
13c
22c
18c
16c
13c
Market
COMMERCIAL CREAMERY CO.
Spokane, Wash.
No. 41.
REPORT OF THE CONDITION OF
THE FIRST TRUST & SAVINGS
THE FIRST TRUST & SAVINGS
BANK
At Moscow, in the State of Idaho, at
the Close of Business Novem
ber 1st, 1918.
Resources.
Cash on hand :.
Due from banks.
Checks and drafts on other
banks .
Other cash items.
Loans and discounts.
Overdrafts .
Stocks, bonds and warrants.
Banking house, furniture
and fixtures .
Other real estate.
$ 30,039.82
284,007.61
3,958.14
2.639.00
715.737.02
523.52
115,369.74
23,000.00
500.00
T otal
$1,175,774.85
Liabilities.
Individual deposits subject
to check .
$ 549,641.11
Savings deposits. 368,433.11
1.294.42
138.344.31
1.834.10
521.00
Postal savings deposits.
Time certificates of deposit.
Cashier's checks .
Certified checks .
Due to other banks (depos
its)
7,632,29
Total deposits .
Capital stock paid in... ,
Undivided profits, less
penses, interest and taxes
paid .
Other liabilities .
... .$1,067,700.34
.. .. 100 , 000.00
ex
8,024.96
49.55
Total .
State of Idaho, County of Latah, ss.
T, W. E. Cahill, cashier of the above
named bank, do solemnly swear that the
above statement is true to the best of
my knowledge and belief.
$1.175,774.85
.W. E. CAHILL.
Cashier.
Correst Attest :
H. MELGARD,
M. E. LEWIS,
Directors.
Subscribed and sworn to before me
this 13th day of Nov., 1918.
I certify that I am NOT an Officer or
Director of this Bank.
A. H. OVERSMITH,
Notary Public.
President Lindley telegraphed Mr.
Edmundson after receiving the telegram
and told him to get his transportation
from the quartermaster.
Hec Edmundson, as he was known
here, left Moscow fn September. He was
one of the University of Idaho's most
prominent athletes. He went to the
Olympic games in Stockholm as miler
and half-miler, was coach of the track
team in 1912-15, and was looked upon by
the' fellows as-a hero. He was adjutant
for two years at the University.
Lieutenant BIcamaster says of him :
"I was sorry to see Mr. Edmundson leave
Idaho. With the military experience he
has ■ Had, he will surely make good at
Princeton."
Dogs Are Cremated.
The three dogs that have been so con
spicuous on the campus nipping the boys
in the heels during drill formations are
A firing squad was detailed
.no more.
to dispose of them last Saturday, and
the modern method of cremation was
used to dispose of them, instead of
burial. The large furnace at the heating
plant served as a crematorium.
Narum-Stauffer.
Miss Ovida Narum and Ed. Stauffer
were married yesterday at Coeur d'Alene,
Idaho. They are Jjoth well known in
Moscow, Miss Narum having worked
in the office of Frank L. Moore for the
past year, and Mr. Stauffer as mechanic
at The Idaho Garage. They will make
their home in Spokane.
+ + + + + * + + + + * + + +
MARKETS
*♦***♦«**♦***♦
The following market quotations
are the prices paid to the producer
by the dealer and are changed daily,
thus giving the public the accurate
quotations in all classes of grain,
produce and meats.
Hay and Grain
Wheat, Bluestem No. 1, bulk,
net, delivered to warehouses $2.0214
Wheat, Bluestem, No. 1, sacked
net, delivered to warehouses 2.1114
Wheat, Fortyfold, No. 1, bulk,
net, delivered to warehouses 2.0214
Wheat, Fortyfeld, No. 1, a Iced,
net, delivered to warehouses 2.1114
Wheat, White Club, No. 1 bulk,
net, delivered to warehouses 2.0014
Wheat, White Club, No. 1, a'ked
net, delivered to warehouses 2.0914
Wheat, Red Russian, No. 1 bulk
net, delivered to warehouses 1.9714
Wheat, Red Russian, Ne. 1 sTc'd
net, delivered to warehouses 2.0614
No. 1 Feed Oats sacked, per
hundred .
No. 1 Timothy Hay....
White Beans, per pound
Produce.
3.16
$34.00
0814
Eggs, per doz.
60c
DR. J. J. HERRINGTON
Office over Willis' Drug Store
Phone 346
Phone 187R
Orland & Lee
ATTORNEYS and COUNSELORS AT LAW
Practice in District, State, Federal Court*
Office: First National Bank Bids.
MOSCOW, IDAHO

FOR FIRST CLASS SHOE
REPAIRING
go to
J. N. FRIEDMAN
HARNESS SHOP
JOHN W. STEVENSON, M. D.
Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat
Glasses Fitted
Office of Dr. Aapray, 303 3rd Are.
Phone 177
FINEST LINE OF HIGH GRADE
WOOLENS. YOUR INSPECTION
SOLICITED
O. H. SCHWARZ, Tailor.
j. a. McDaniel
Moscow, Idaho
Dentist
Phone 229
LATAH COUNTY
TITLE & TRUST COMPANY
Abstracts of Title
Mortgage Loans
Conveyancing
Thompson Insurance Agency
Fire Insurance, Automobile and
Plate Glass Insurance, Fidelity and
Casualty Bonds
J. G. Vennigerhelz, Prep.
Moscow, Idaho.
[Get the Genuine
and Avoid
Waste

©
ja^cconomy
in Every Cake
Butter, creamery, per lb
Butter, ranch, per lb.
Potatoes, per cwt.
Young chickens, per lb...
Hogs, live wt., light, per lb.16c
Old roosters, per lb
Hogs, dressed, heavy, per lb.. . [email protected]
Hogs, dressed, light, per lb...l9£fe
Veal, live wt., per lb..
Veal, dressed, per lb
Spring lambs, per lb.
Mutton, per lb.
65c
60c
80c
15c
08c
.6 at
[email protected]
9c
[email protected]
YOUR
MONEY
Draws interest when
deposited in this bank.
It earns nothing when
carried around in your
pocket.
FIRST TRUST
& SAVINGS BANK
I
Inland Market
10,000 chickens
wanted. Highest
market price paid.
Monuments
THE MOSCOW MARBI.E
WORKS
George H. Moody, Proprietor
Has the finest tine of Monomen to
and all Kinds of Marble Work to
be found in the Inland Empire
PRICES REASONABLE
See Our Work Before Ordering
Victrolas and
Victor Records
Sherfey's Book Store
Moscow, Idaho
If It'» New We Are Sure the
First to Have It
f- M - H - H - I - H - M - I - , I M-I-H
-t.
Hotel Moscow
TOM WRIGHT, Prop.
*î*
*
i Thoroughly Modern *
; 1 FIRST CLASS GRILL *
J AUTO BUS AT ALL TRAINS |
i 4.
You will find you save more
and live better if you trade at
the
THIRD STREET
MARKET
CHICKENS, GEESE, DUCKS
AND HIDES WANTED |
L. M. KITLEY
PHONE 248
CLASSIFIED ADS
HELP WANTED—Female
WANTED — COMPETENT GIRL
for general housework. Mrs. Geo.
Weber. Phone 62J; .corner 1st and
Van Buren. 35-tf.
WANTED—GIRL FOR GENERAL
housework. 407 Spotswood. 39-41
SITUATION WANTED—Male
WNATED—FURNACE TO FIRE OR
janitor work; colored man. Call Bob
at the Pastime.
38-40
FOR RENT—Rooms
FOR RENT — A ROOM WITH OR
without sleeping porch ; hot and cold
ater; modern conveniences; price rea
< nabe.
quhart.
425 East Third St. Mrs. D.
13tf
1 HOUSEKEEPING
FOR RENT
suite; also sleeping room.
105W. 317 South Jefferson.
Call
37-48
FOR RENT—FURNISHED APART
ments and furnished rooms at
Eggan's apartments. Phone 206H.
231-tf
FOR RENT—ONE LARGE 3-ROOM
apartment, $16; one 3-room apart
ment, slightly smaller, $12; on*
2-room apartment, $10; one 2-room
apartment, $9; two furnished room*,
$7. 310 South Lilly. Phone 338.
29-tf
FOR TRADE
WANTED—TO EXCHANGE ONE
two bottom 14-kich gang plow for
three bottom. Phone 9251. J. H. Dye.
289-tf
FOR RENT—Houses
FOR RENT—A 7-ROOM MODE
house, close in. C. H. Patten. 31

FOR RENT—AN 8-ROOM MODERN
house near the domijory. Phone 170J.
Mrs. John Shannon. 3tf
FOR RENT—2-ACRE TRACT WITH
5-room house, cheap. Phone 290R.
32tf
_ FOR SALE—Poultry
FOR SALE—FULL BLOODED S. C.
Phone
35-41
White Leghorn Cockerels.
897X1
FOR SALE—Livestock
PIGS FOR SALE. PHONE 913X5.
35-41
W ANTED—Miscellaneous
WANTED—20 CARS OF U. S.
Grade No. 1 White and Russet
potatoes. Phone or write Garfield
Fruit & Produce Co., Garfield, Wash.
40-tf
WANTED—GOOD LIVE DEALER
to sell the best truck on the market.
Can make deliveries 1 to 5 tons. Write
Rochester Motor Co., 1012 Sprague
Ave., Spokane, Wash.
235-tf
WANTED TO RENT—AN OFFI0E
desk. Telephone 362.
291-tf
WANTED—100 TONS GOOD PEA
or write Garfield
Fruit & Produce Co., Garfield, Wash.
' 40-tf
straw.
Call
WANTED TO BUY A FIRST CLASS
car. Phone 917X3.
40-45
FOR SALE—Real Estate
FOR TRADE — IMPROVED TVv'O
acres for small car. Phone 290R. 31tf
FOR SALE—A 5-ROOM MODERN
residence; good cellar and
Phone 263H. Fred Stone.
gar
16
FOR SALE—8-ROOM MODERN
residence ; choice location, corner lot,
garage, etc. Phone 267Y. Sam Silvey.
2S5-tf.
FOR SALE — HOUSE AND LOT,
corner First and Polk Sts. Inquire
Mrs. Wm. Arnett. 244tf
FOR SALE — 80 ACRES THREE
miles east of Moscow ; house and barn.
Wnte E. R. Fuller, Lewiston, Idaho, or
N. G. Gilbertson, adjoining farm. 6tf
see
HOMESTEAD RELINQUISHMENT
for sale. Chris Anderson wagon
sh °P- 35-40
FOR SALE—Miscellaneous
FOR SALE—24 HEAD SHROPSHIRE
sheep. Write A. E. Alexander. Phone
Farmer 942K5.
32tf
inline - knight 7- passenger-'
touring car, in good condition, ,or sale v
r trade.
Moscow Auto & Supply Co.
283tf
FOR SALE—1 DEERING BINDER;
•eell for cash or trade in stock. M. J.
Schu, Moscow, Idaho. Rt. 3.
SELDEN TRUCKS SOLD ON DE
ferred payment plan. Write Rochester
Motor Co., 1012 Sprague Ave., Spo
kane, Wash. 235-tf
F 9?,, S * ALE OR TRADE—1918 BUICK
. ' 4 - A' 1 condition. Phone 189N even
■ngs. 34-40
244tf
GOOD BOYS' OVERCOAT; ALSO
several suits made up, for sale, cheap.
Schwarz, the Tailor. 35-41
FOR SALE—1 LEATHER LOUNGE
1 bookcase, 1 oak chiffonier, 1 oak
table, 2 mattresses. 2 oak rockers. 1
bird's eye maple bedstead, 3 crocks 1
woven wrie spring. 720 Idaho street.
Phone 274L. 42tf
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE — CARROTS; SMALL
pigs and one large sorrel horse,
6 years old, weight 1300 lbs.; horse
for $100.00. E. A. Hendrickson,
phone 9268. _ 40-46
WILLIAMSON IS IN THE MAR
ket for 30 to 50 tons of Alfalfa
Hay; 10 tons Timothy.
32-tf
WANTED—10 GOOD MILK COWS;
must be fresh or coming fresh
soon. Holstein or Durham stock only
considered. Must not be over 5 years
old. Apply to N. Williamson.
32-tf
».
THOSE WISHING ODD JOBS DONE
phone Ray Stevens, c-o Plummer's
26--kf
Cafe.

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