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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, November 13, 1918, Image 3

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1918-11-13/ed-1/seq-3/

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Clever New Styles in
at LOW
hnrî*
( l»tS
DRESSES
w
TO
Sales PRIGES
K
l!&
The Annual Thanksgiving Sale gives you real bargains on new
desirable garments, newer styles and newer materials—all at Cut
Prices,
ff't
•V
You can buy a good Serge Dress as low as $10.00; Silk, Jersey and
Velvet Dresses at $13.75 and up, and a better assortment could not
be found in any Spokane store. Come and see.
*
i
i
The Fashion Shop
Wu,>
if
\r
if
m
if
Where Price and Quality Meet
M
CitÿRevft
Weather-—Tonight cloudy.
Thursday, probably rain.
Mrs. J. J. Campbell left this morn
ing for Pullman to visit a few days.
Esther Peterson, from north of
Moscow is in the city shopping.
Mrs. Mary Wernitsch who has been
visiting her sister, Mrs. M. B. Dallas,
left for her home today in Lewiston.
Tom Armstrong and wife and three
children, who live east of Moscow
about six miles, are all ill of influ
enza.
Warmer
Mrs. Ethridge, of Viola, formerly
Miss Fanny Murphy, is ill of influ
Her husband and his mother,
enza.
are also ill of the same disease.
Mrs. Jerry Gelwick and mother,
Mrs. E. R. Dewey returned today
from Seattle. Mrs. Gelwick has re
covered from an attack of influenza.
Mr. Gelwick will remain on the coast
for the present.
Mrs. T. G. Reese of Portland ar
rived today to visit several weeks
with her sister, Mrs. Geo. Stewart,
and other relatives,
formerly Miss Mina Fry, was county
treasurer of Latah county for many
years.
Mrs. Reese,
A construction train of the North
ern Pacific, comprising about 35 men
came to Moscow Monday from Spo
kane, and are engaged in rebuilding
two bridges belonging to the company
within the city limits over Paradise
creek. The crew expect to finish the
work about Thursday.
Chas. Crowe, who has been visiting
in the east for three weeks, returned
home today. He was accompanied
by Mr. and Mrs. Will Cairy of La
motte, Iowa, who have come to spend
the winter with their children, Mrs.
W. M. Blacker, Mrs. Chas. Crowe and
Walter Cairy.
E. H. Hutchinson, better known as
of Spokane, ?I°Xye?te?d?y P fn Mos
cow on business. Mr. Hutchinson is
now general western agent for the
Osborne calender and has many eus
tomers in Moscow.
Walter Mozee, of New York, is here
for a few days, visiting his brother
in-law, GUm Grice. Mr. Mozee is v in
the army and cap>e west to California
with the body o. * soldier from that
state who died in New York. He
secured a 10-day furlough and will
spend much of the time here.
Guy Penwell, whose eyes were
badly burned by a premature explo
sion of gunpowder during Monday's
celebration, is resting easily today.
Dr. Carol Smith of Spokane, has stat
ed that unless infection sets in, the
sight will be restored.
Elza Griffith, at Camp Eustis, Vir
ginia, is ill of influenza but has not
Say's pipe? * err ° r " ^
Miss Margaret Pflepsen, daughter
of N. M. Pflepsen of N. Main is visit
ing in Palouse.
Dr. Carol Smith, who left for Spo
kane this morning, states that the
masks for prevention of influenza are
not required now in Spokane.
In order to reduce the stock to a
minimum before the quarantine is
raised, the Post Exchange at the as
say building of the university, wil!
immediately reduce prices on
goods now on hand. This will include
smokes, candies, Hersheys, handker
chiefs, socks, soaps, tooth brushes,
combs, stationery of all kinds, cookies,
jams, jellies, ketchup, and many other
articles.
all
ATTORNEY OF BANNOCK CO.
FORMER IDAHO STUDENT
Professor Gill has just received
word that Isaac McDougall, a gradu
ate from the law school with the 1915
class, had, by a large majority, won
in the election as prosecuting attorney
■ of Bannock county.
Mr. McDougall was very popular
while in college. He was a member
of Phi Delta Theta fraternity and
of Phi Alpha Delta, the honorary law
fraternity.
HEAD OF UNIVERSITY
ON EDUCATIONAL WORK
PRESIDENT BINDLEY
STATEMENT CONCERNING
S. A. T. C. STATUS
MAKES
The question of perhaps greatest
importance just now with the S. A.
T. C. and the vocational men is the
possible effect of the forthcoming
peace upon students here in military
work.
In an interview with an Argonaut
representative, President Lindley
says:
"From the first I have believed
the plan of vocational training for
soldiers was designed by the govern
ment to meet the needs of the period
of reconstruction as well as the de
mands of the war. This country has
had an insufficient number of men
trained in these crafts. The increas
er than a course in general mech
anics ?
ing role of machinery in modern life
places an increasing premium on such
knowledge and skill. What better
knowledge could there be for a farm
"As to the Collegiate Section, there
is much evidence that the United
States plans to provide for the educa
tion of young soldiers whose school
work has been interrupted by the
It is rumored that the S. A. T.
war.
C. is to be established in the Amer
ican Army in France during the per
iod of further service there and will
ator Reed proposed an amendment to
the Manpower Bill providing for two
years training for all returning sol
dierg who desire it> Judging from the
to fit the new conditions, but the edu
cational program, I trust, will be
carried forward. The man who ex
pec ^ s j - 0 compete successfully in the
new era now dawning will find need
for all the training possible. In Oth
er words, the man who expects to
sqcceed without scientific training
w jn fj n j himself on the scrap heap,
continue until demobilization.
Tt will be remembered that Sen
telegram above quoted, the govern
ment realizes a similar obligation
to the members of the S. A. T. C.
who are now in college. These stu
dents entered upon a course of colleg
iate training for government service.
It is hoped and believed that they will
be permitted to remain in school long
enough to derive a real benefit from
the experience.
"Courses of study may be modified
' K
"This program will not appeal to
the men who have no ambition, but
those who desire to win promotion
and success in the world will appre
ciate this as a golden opportunity to
get ready without expense to them
selves for the strenuous days just
ahead."
nu simm still
DEMANDS moil
GUILD HALL NO LONGER NEED
ED AS HOSPITAL—CLASSES
RESUME WORK
The influenza situation while not
quite so encouraging this week as
last, is not at present causing un- i
due alarm here. One more death, that
of Leland Eddy, of Sandpoint, oc
curred at 3 o'clock Monday morn
ing.
The admissions for the last few
days have shown an increase espec
ially the admissions Friday and Sat
urday. But the discharges continue,
and the hospitals are being emptied
of influenza patients.
The Guild Hall, which was used for
a convalescent hospital, is no longer
been closed.
Classes continue as per schedules.
Girls from town are meeting the
quarantine restrictions and are mov
ing on to the campus so that they
may take up their regular class
work.
■ l*s.
PRINCETON PICKINGS
MANY HAVE INFLUENZA
Weyman Wiltin is helping Roy
Gurnsey at Onawa in his store.
L. L. Young went to Spokane with
a car load of fat hogs Friday him and
Joe Jones.
Mr. Shook's family are sick with (
the influenza.
called Monday to see Mrs. Shook.
John Lienhart family are all im
proving, John being the worst.
Mrs. Jock Graves was called to
i Bovill to see her son, Friday, who
I has influenza at Dr. Gipson's hos- |
pital. He is improving.
Mrs. Agnes Crumbley had her son,
Rily Ross' body shipped from Mon
tana and buried in the Freeze ceme- (
tery Tuesday, November 12.
Mrs. Dudley Hobbs and children,
Dr. Thompson was
j
. tj„ •„ „ j .
of Bovill came down to attend her)
brother's funeral. |
Roy' Gumsey has stored hia house- j
hold goods and his mother is keep- !
F ' r
heaven's sake, let us stop right now !
ing
Mrs. Roily Barnett and little
daughter are visiting her parents, G.
D. Gurnseys.
Mrs. Edgar Adair went to Moscow
Friday shopping.
Mrs. C. R. Hawkins has been on
the sick list for several weeks, is
improving
♦ ♦ + ♦ + + ♦♦♦>♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦



CONTRIBUTION BOX
*

"Moscow, November 13.
"Dear Mr. Editor: The days and
months succeeding a war are days of
peril—even of greater peril than that of
war. In beatifig the enemy we were
united—it was the first condition of
victory. Nation with nation, class with
class, political group with political group,
and man with man. But the victory
We're not equal to the job. People are
sensitive and touchy after a fight ; they
need a great deal of kind handling.
There are always chances of making
friction. The safest way to avoid it is
to acknowledge how much the other fel
low did—and to say less about the first
person, singular or plural.
"It is time, for instance, that America
saved the day.
America forget that; they will blow her
trumpet, all right. But it hurts the
English and the French and Italians to
have it rammed down their throats be
fore their wounds are healed. They
merely ask that while they themselves,
with their hats off, shout praises of
U. S. A. that she will sometimes remem
ber the clay was saved in the morning
as well as in the evening. We shall for
ward peace best; but shouting each
other's praises—not our own. As an
Englishman (by birth), I say: " Thank
God for America !'.Is it mutual? There :
is no peace without mutuality.
"Mav I add another word. We are
all looking towards a closer union
English-speaking people, towards the j
elimination of all sources of friction and
You are in that. Mr. I
Then, t submit it in all humil
The Allies will not let
:
Editor.
misunderstanding.
ity, it is not wise to make cuts at King
George. King George and the English
Constitution are not Kaiser William and
Germany. Without any comparison be
tween the relative autocracy of a presi
dent and a limited (very much limited!)
monarch, it will be well for the sake of
our permanent good friendship to let
the English look after their king. I will
say frankly that nothing 'gets the blood'
of a Britisher sooner than a contemptu
ous cut about his king. I say that as an
American-in-the-making, not as a Brit
isher. It is a statement for fact, and
worth a little consideration in the present
situation. When Britain feels that
another constitution is expedient for the
expansion of her national and social free
dom. she will see to it without delay. If
King George were asked by the people
to step down tomorrow, he would do
so—and remain the most respected
gentleman in Britain.
"I trust that all I have said will be
taken in the spirit in which it is said.
The biggest thing in the future is a more
complete consolidation of the English
speaking peoples. Such consolidation
waits upon a complete comprehension of
one another ; to understand we need to
be frank.
"Yours truly,
"W. H. BRIDGE."
MORE THAN HALF THE
WORLD INVOLVED
COUNTRIES AT WAR WITH GER
MANY WHICH WILL BE REP
RESENTED AT PEACE TABLE
To understand the complications con
; with the peace agreement
one must consider the number of na
i ons now at war and the necessity that
c;u: h be consulted in the negotiations to
: lll0re or ] es s extent. To make the facts
mere plain, the following list ol war
declarations is given :
j Austria against Seriba, July 28, 1514.
Germany against Russia, August 1,
I
i 1914.
France against Germany, August 3,
1 '914. ,, . ,
! Germany against 1-ranee, August .1,
! 1514.
Get many against Belgium, August 4.
1914
Great Britain against .Germany, Au
j gust 4, 1514.
Austria against Russia, August 6,
1914.
Montenegro against Austria, August
8. 1514.
Austria against Montenegro, August
9, 1914.
Serbia against Germany, August 9,
1914.
•France against Austria, August 13,
1514.
Great Britain against Austria, August
13, 1514.
Japan against Germany, August 23,
1914.
Austria against Japan, August 27,
1914.
Austria against Belgium, August 28,
1914.
Russia against Turkey, November 3,
1914.
Great Britain against Turkey, Novom-j
her 5. 1914.
ofliyL - »- . w,. 10
Italy against Bulgaria, October
1915. p ^ r ., , M . rrh g
Germany against Portugal. March V,
1916.
against Turkey, November 5, ;
h ranee
1
1914.
Turkey against the allies, November j
23. 1914.'
Portugal against Germany, November j
23. 1914. !
Serbia against Turkey, December 2, j
1914. ' . I
Italy against Austria, May 24, 1911>. j
San Marino against Austria, May 24,
1915.
Italy against Turkey, August 21, 1915.
Bulgaria against Serbia, October 14,
1915.
Great Britain against Bulgaria, Oc
tober 15, 1915.
France against Bulgaria, October 16,
1915.
Serbia against Bulgaria, October 16,
1915.
against Bulgaria, October 19,
Russia
Rumania against Austria, August 27,
1916.
Italy against Germany, August 28,
1916.
Turkey against Rumania, August 29,
1916.
Germany against Rumnaia, September
14, 1916.
Greece against Bulgaria, November 28,
1916 (Greek provisional government).
Greece against Germany, November
28, 1916 (Greek provisional govern
ment).
United States against Germany, April
6, 1917.
Panama against Germany, April 7,
1917.
Cuba against Germany, April 7, 1917.
The Man in the
Tobacco Store
Says
J. V.
ly taste, and learn (or him
self how much longer the
small Gravely chew stays
with him than a big chew
of ordinary plug.
—it does beat all how men
are taking to Real Grave
ly. now that they know it
costs nothing extra to chew
this class of tobacco. All
you have to do is to get a
man to take his first plug
of Gravely. Let him get
the pure, satisfying Grave
If goes further — that's why yea
earn get the good taste tf this class
ef tobacco without extra tost.
M
PEYTON BRAND
Real Gravely Chewing Plug
lO^ a pouch -and worth it
I
1
:
P D GRAVELY rO&ACTCO CO., DANVILLE VA
Home Is Where the Bey Is In
This War
Bv Bruce Barton
I visited a home where a service flag hangs;
»nd while we ate we talked of the boy who is
ov^r there.
"I wonder if he is cold tpnight," the mother
•aid, "I wonder if he has a place to warm him
self and dry his clothes; and something good to
eat."
"What wouldn't I give to he with him," she
•aid and we were silent, knowing her heart.
But I thought of the Soldiers of Friendliness
who that very night would crawl out across No
Man's Land to take chocolate and hot coffee to
that boy.
Of the huts with their warm fires burning; of
the great lecturers and preachers and actors and
f ictures that are over there.
thought to myself; "There is a dif
ference between this and every other war. For
when the boys have marched away before, the
influence of their homes has stopped at the front
gate and could go no farther.
But in this war it follows the flag, across the
ocean, over the shell tom battle land, straight
up to the front line trenches.
Home is where the boy is in this war. From
every town and village the lines of helpfulness
run out. . . (
And no boy leaves his home behind him!
step by step it travels with him, financed by the
folks behind him—a token of their love.
motion
And
This space contributed by
W. E. Wallace, Jeweler
Greece against Germany, July 2, 1917
(government of Alexander).
Greece against Bulgaria, July 2, 1917
(government of Alexander).
Siam against Germany, July 22, 1917.
Siam against Austria, July 22, 1917.
Liberia against Germany, August 4,
1917.
China against Germany, August 14,
1917.
China against Austria, August 14,
1917.
Brazil against Germany, October 26,
1917.
United States against Austria, Decem
ber 7. 1917.
Panama against Austria, December
10, 1917.

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