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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, November 16, 1918, Image 2

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1918-11-16/ed-1/seq-2/

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The DAILY STAR-MIRROR
Published every evening except Sun
day, at Moscow, Idaho.
GEO. N. LAMPHERE, Publisher.
The Official Newspaper of the City of
Moscow.
Entered as second-class matter Oct.
16, 1911, at the postoffice of Moscow,
Idaho, under the Act of Congress of
March, 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
•- Deliverd by carrier to any part of city
* Per Month .60c
Three Months.$1.50
Six Months .
One Year . . .
2.75
6.00
By Mail
(outside of city and on rural routes):
Per Month .
Three Months ...
Six Months .
One Year .
40c
.$1.15
. 2.25
4.00
The (Weekly) Idaho Post:
Per Year
$1.50
Member of the Associated Press.
NO MORE BULLETINS.
After today The Star-Mirror will not
issue bulletins. The practice which be
gan shortly after the present editor took
charge of the telegraphic news, will be
discontinued.
When the war news became so in
tensely interesting bulletins were issued
and posted on the front windows of The
Star-Mirror office. They proved very
attractive and hundreds of persons saw
and read them daily. Then merchants,
who saw the crowds gathered around
these boards, wanted them to post at
their stores and these were made. The
demand increased until nine copies of
each bulletin were made. They went to
Pullman, to the barracks where the sol
diers are quartered, to the university and
to business houses in Moscow.
There can be no doubt that a number
of persons who could well afford to sub
scribe for the paper read these bulletins
which cost nothing and did not support
the paper. It hurt the circulation of The
Star-Mirror to some extent, but the serv
ice gave to the people of Moscow the
news just as soon as it reached town,
and The Star-Mirror was glad to serve
the people of its home town.
The preparing and posting of the bul
letins required a vast amount of work.
Three times a day, at the very least, and
some times six times a* 1 day the bulletins
were written and posted. The editor
prepared the bulletins then called up
each of the merchants who got them and
informed them that the bulletins were
ready. This required much time and
labor.
Now that the war is over and the i
people are not so anxious about the news!
from "over there" the practice will be
Irom over there, the practice um ne
discontinued. We know the people ap
preciated the bulletins and we hope they
will realize how much extra work was
entailed by preparing and posting them,
and that they will not feel disappointed
because they are to be discontinued.
Star-Mirror will contain all of
the latest news furnished by the Asso
ciated Press and will be delivered to the
homes of its patrons in Moscow as early
The paper
as possible every evening,
is working hard for Moscow and trying
to give the people a better news service
than they have ever had. If it gets the
patronage it ought to have the service,
and it will be improved and increased.
We believe, as many of our patrons
lave told us and as other publishers
have repeatedly said, that "J he Star
Mirror is a credit to Moscow" and de
serves all the patronage it gets.
to to to
Tomorrow will be a day that will go
down in history as marking the triumphal
entry of the soldiers of the Allies in im
portant enemy strongholds. Metz, Strass
bnrg and Bucharest are to be entered in
triumph by the civil and military repre
sentatives of the conquering nations, and
from tomorrow the reign of Germans in
these places will be a thing of history,
to Bs PS
The democrats in congress evidently
plan to retain control of the senate.
They have started contests against the
seating of two republicans who were de
clared elected on November 5. if these
men are denied seats in the senate the
democrats will retain control. Politics
■was evidently not permanently 'ad
journed."
Sr- Pa K
Won't the people who refused to con
tribute to the united war fund—the fund
that goes to care for, amuse and enter
tain our soldiers who brought peace to
the world—feel a little ashamed when
they meet those soldiers face to face,
when the victors return?
We are told in today's dispatches that
crews of German submarines declare
they will stay with the kaiser,
send them to Holland to be interned
until the Allies get ready to try them
lor murder.
Well,
One reason why the truth finds it so
hard to overtake a lie is that the lie is
short and to the point, while the truth
insists upon a summary of 3,789 words
and a full report of 365 pages with two
volumes of indeces.—New York Evening
Post.
On He to
So long as the cost of living stays any
where near its present figure, we can't
jcem to call up any very dear vision of
general polygamy after the war.—Kan
sas City Star.

It is wrong to say that women do the
proposing. A proposal of marriage, like
a proposal of peace, comes from the side
that is ready to surrender.—St. Louis
Star.
Ij|c war is ended. Election is over,
ami now we are promised that the in
fluenza quarantine will be raised next
Sunday, all in time for Thanksgiving,
the following Thursday.
■■
Kaiser Bill said;
"'The defeated coun
tries, will pay for this war and genera
tions yet unhorn will struggle under the
weight of debt." Let us make Bill's
words true.
The truth is God has never been with
"Willyum," and "Willyum" will never be
with God. It will be an entirely differ
ent line-up.—Houston (Texas) Post.
General Foch took the "mania" out
of Germania and it now remains for the
allied peace delegates to kill the germ.
PB te ms
Kaiser Bill believes in "safety first."
Theme: "Preparation for Peace."
Text: "So Fight I," Cor. 9:26.
Life in all ages has been earnest.
Life in these first years after we
have come up out of the baptism of
blood is freighted with responsibili
ties and duties. The highest obliga
tion which these years bring is to
show our relationship to society. The
greatest crime is indifference and
no true man can withdraw himself
from this imposed duty, can isolate
himself from those great principles
whose settlement speak for or against
human progress. We are truly" rich
in the legacy Time has bequeathed
to us but with this power a wonder
ful charge has been given, a sacred
trust has been assigned to our keep
ing. The power of moulding the
future we hold in our hands. For
the thoughts and the ideals which
shall control the action and dominate
the future life of this century are
now taking root in our lives.
There are crucial periods in every
nation s life which mark the adoption
oi- rejection of policies or ideals from
which time dates the inculcation of
seeds which ingender political degre- i
dation, corruption and dissolution; or;
mark an infusion- of new life which I
raises its people to a greater freedom |
and lays its tribute upon the altar of
Progress.
„ , ,
Germany dreamed. She was the
P rou d mistiess of the woild. But her
d , re T wa /.^ e P r ° duct g* fitful
s i um i, er of intoxication. She drank at
the fountain of Conquest. An insati
ate ambition for mastery and triumph j
)Y a s fostered. It infused, itself into ]
life and thought. Avarice, repine,
.
craven ignomy and baseness were its j
offspring. The heart of that proue. j
nation was eaten by the cancer of I
militarism. The altruistic philosophy j
of Jesus the Nazarene was cast aside
for the materialism of her higher
critics. She has smirched the pages
of history with her crimes, the most
awful blot of all the years.
Another nation was born in
hearts of its hardy forefathers. The
principles of liberty and equality
opportunity were written. Time
passed. That nation whose corner
stone was religious freedom whose
foundation was the immutible pnn
ciples that all men are equal, now
emerges, smoke-begrimed from this
grave conflict waged in defense
these principles, energies through sac
nfice, but triumphant! Today Am
erica stands in the forefront of the
world s great nations and when she
shall have shaken off menacing para
sites clinging to her, with a manifest
destiny will lead then on toward the
coveted goal of political perfection—
the happy Home of a Mighty People!
You see the relation of my text,
Paul fought. Christ is more than an
ideal. He is Life. Paul had that life,
Trim there is much m an ideal. A
mastering, dominant purpose whi-'
pervades, controls, animates and di
rects every energy of a life. It is
the silent gentle working force which
impells us to activities which set in
operation the latent powers of our
being and beget within us aspirations
and hopes which speak in a voice not
to be stilled. But Christ is all this
and more. He is the highest ideal
and then it is the Nazarene that takes
us by the hand and leads us up the
Way. . We list to His counsels and
with the poise of Jehovah's sons we
walk securely into the Realm of Day.
Twice victor returning with full num
' 3ers -
DEAN HAMILTON,
Minister, Baptist Church.
"The Lord Reigneth; Let the Earth
Rejoice.
Ps. 97-1.
The world is filled today with the
rejoicings of Peace. In the struggle
that has ended brute force has been
arrayed against righteousness. The
mailed fist has encountered the divine
forces of God in the awakening of an
outraged humanity and has met its
doom. God has given us the victory;
justice and honor are once more as
sured a lasting place in the social
order. Humbly grateful that we have
had some small part in carrying out
the plans of God, we lift our hearts
unto Him in praise and thanksgiving
that the war has ceased and that we
are once more to enjoy the blessings
of Peace.
The war lords of the world have
had their day—Cain and Esau and
Senacherit and Wilhelm and all their
kind. From the time that Lubal-cain
first fashioned the molten metals into
w«yipons of war until todrv the sword
has been held aloft as the min'istrant
justice between tribe and tribe,
darf and clan, nation and nation. But
the day of the sword 'is ended. Such
men as Caesar and Napoleon and
Hindenburg have proved unworthy of
world leadership and incompetent to
PETER SWENSON, FARMER
OF NEAR DEARY IS DEAD
Peter Swens.on, a farmer living
Little Bear ridge, died Wednesday
from influenza. His wife and daught
er, Miss Mabel, had just returned last
Tuesday from a visit at Spirit Lake.
It is thought she brought the disease
home with her. Three other children
are in bed with the flu.
Tightus Asplund is ill at his home
with a severe cold.
Phil Asplund returned from Prince
ton, where he went on business,
Thursday
Deary held quite a celebration Mon
day in honor of the end of the war.
Camp one has closed down for the
winter. Harsh's camp is running full
blast.
Axel Olson is spending a few days
at the A. A. Anderson home.
r-;
Latah County Records.
C. M.—Mandley Whitney and George
Whitney to C. W. McFarland, $322.12;
five horses and colts, two-thirds crops
on lots 1-2 E 1-2 NW 1-4 31-42-4 W.
Rel.—First Trust & Savings Bank to
Arthur R. Swift, r-m 2-14-17.
Rel.—John P. Duke to C. B. Kegley,
Y-m to Joseph Milton, 1-12-14.
W. D.—A. N, Coverdalc to Allen
control the destinies of a people. No
longer will we submit our questions
of difference to the uncertain verdicts
of war. Brute force whether in the
slave drivers last or in the massed
legions of a nation's army belongs to
the ages that are gone.
In the new era that is to come our
first need is to reorganize the reign
ancy of God and to order the affairs
of individual, social and national life
by the wisdom of His word. Democ
racy must be continued with the will
of God else it will react and render
asunder the solidarities of society. In
the ultimate analysis the problem of
our national relations is a problem
of religion. It is faith and hope and
love that will finally cast out the
demons of hate and war and finally
direct the world from its calvary to
its resurrection.
WAYNE S. SNODDY,
Pastor, Presbyterian Church.
"There Are Better Things Than This
Life Awaiting the Worthy Ones."
Text:
Let not your heart be
troubled; ye believe in God, believe
also in me.
"In my Father's house are many
mansions; if it were not so I would
have told you. I go to prepare a
place for you.
"And if I go and prepare a place
for you, I will come unto myself;
that where I am, there ye may be
also." St. John 14:1-3.
The fact that our churches are
closed reminds us more forceably that
whether at home or in the trenches
or a t the battle front, we ar all in
the presence of death.
We are learning as never before,
the truth that many things are worse
than death and that many things are
better than this life
God - s wi u must be done and
| Sunday commemorates our Christian
j faith ; that those who die worthy
inherit eternal life
I There need be lio lonely day,
homesick hour for the Christian soul.
the ; [ n his account of the scene of Geth
I semane, Matthew tells us:
of (j eS us) went a little farther." This
is more than mere detail. It is
eternal revelation. Beyond the three
w ho entered into His passion,
we nt alone.
j n every hour of trial, in every
| perience 6f sorrow, He waits to corn
of .fort and stiengthen. He loves,
| knows and He makes no mistakes,
There are no incomplete lives; no
finished destinies in His economy,
So take courage, dear heart. You,
whose ,,ie is sad; you who have had
care upon care, sorrow upon sorrow;
you unto whose home the reaper,
death has visited and taken your
i ove d ones, one by one; you whose
heart is brolfe and bleeding—there
a heart that is warm with love; one
that feels every throb; one that has
, leai sympathy, such as no one else
1 c
s
ranee.
His strong arms and says:
unto me all ye that labor and ar
heavy laden and I will give vou rest
When the training is complete, the
io SSOn Darned, then c-mes the cal!
f rom across the eternal sea.
j H e calls us to the larger joys and
) privileges of the land bevond the
j stars and e 'en tho we go "Thru the
| va ij ey of the s h ad ow of death," lean
| j ng on H ''m. we go unfearingly and
in triumph to His home where His
■ paternal love welcomes us.
B. W. GERHAÜSER,
i Fairfield, Wash.
Church of God.
;au have.
He it is who tenderly pours
southing I aim ir-to your wounds that
daj Purst forth into frag
Yes, it is He who reaches out
Come
w
'
Special Church Notice.
A nrivat» celebration of Holy Com
munion will be held in S. Mark's
church tomorrow at 10:30. Special
prayers for the sick, and thanksgiving
for peace, will be offered. Church
member* are aaked to spend the
period (10:80 to 11:00) in quietness
and wfaare possible, to join spiritually
in the service. Our worship is not
dependent upon our physical location
in church; it is a matter of mind and
spirit. It must be understood that
there will be no congregation in
church; the congregation will be in
their own homes. The church bell
will be rung before the service;
church doors will be locked.
I shall be glad to conduct short
services In any private home. Is
there possibly some connection be
tween our national neglect of God
and the continuance of the edidem'ic?
It's worth thinking about.
, W. H. BRIDGE,
Rector. S. Mark's Church.
Carl As Rietze of Juliaetta and Lynne
F. Rietze of Frazer, Idaho, arrived yes
terday to visit their parents, Mr. and
Mrs. F. Rietze, of South Adams street.
I Snook, $11,000: NE 1 -2 SW 1-4 N
SE 1-4 30 39-43 W„ save 19.18 acres.
W. D.— '■A. A. McDonald to Flora
McDonald, $1 ; 0 1-2 SW 1-4 5 1-2 NW
1-4 22, save four acres and 110 square
rods; also commencing 26 1-2 rods N
S3 corner of W 1-2 NW 1-4 22, con
taining four acres, 110 rods in 42-5 W.
Lis.—International Mortgage Bank
Ernest Kelty, action to foreclose mort
gage 6-7-13.
Watch Your Flues.
Carl Smith, fire chief, asks the
people of Moscow to inspect the flues
in their homes more frequently. Mr.
Smith says that by examining them
night, with the lights turned off, one
can easily discover if the plaster
mortar between the bricks is loose
displaced, especially if there is a good
fire, for the sparks can be seen then
through the holes if any mortar
missing. Mr. Smith says that a very
large per cent of the fires in Moscow
are from defective flues and careful
watching would prevent nearly all of
them. The suggestion is a good one.
O. W. R. & N. Time Change.
(Sunday)
Beginning
morning the motor which has been
leaving Moscow for Colfax, at 8:15 a.
m., will leave at 8:46. There will be
no other changes of time on this road.
tomorrow
Ba
***************
MARKETS
♦ *♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
The following market quotations
are the prices paid to the producer
by the dealer and are changed daily,
thus giving the public the accurate
quotations in all classes of grain,
produce and meats.
Hay and Grain
Wheat, Bluestem No. 1, bulk,
net, delivered to warehouses $2.02%
Wheat, Bluestem, No. 1, sacked
net, delivered to warehouses 2.11%
Wheat, Fortyfold, No. 1, bulk,
net, delivered to warehouses 2.02%
Wheat, Fortyfold, No. 1, sTced,
net, delivered to warehouses 2.11%
Wheat, White Club, No. 1 bulk,
net, delivered to warehouses 2.00%
Wheat, White Club, No. 1, sited
net, delivered to warehouses 2.09%
Wheat, Red Russian, No. 1 bulk
net, delivered to warehouses 1.97%
Wheat, Red Russian, No. 1 sit'd
net, delivered to warehouses 2.06%
No. 1 Feed Oats sacked, per
hundred .
No. 1 Timothy Hay....
White Beans, per pound
Produce.
*
*
3.15
$34.00
.08%
Eggs, per doz..
Butter, creamery, per lb
Butter, ranch, per lb.
Potatoes, per cwt.
Young chickens, per lb...
Hogs, live wt., light, per lb......16c
Old roosters, per lb
Hogs, dressed, heavy, per lb.. ,[email protected]
Hogs, dressed, light, per lb.. . [email protected]
.6 at 8c
[email protected]
60c
65c
60c
.80c
15c
08c
Veal, live wt., per lb..
Veal, dressed, per lb
Spring lambs, per lb.
Mutton, per lb.
9c
[email protected]
DR. J. J. HERRINGTON
Office over Willis' Drug Store
Phone 346
Phone 187R
-4
no
"He
an
He
ex
He
is
"
I
I
Orland 8c Lee
ATTORNEYS and COUNSELORS AT LAW
Practice in District, State, Federal Courts
Office: First National Bank Bldjr.
MOSCOW, IDAHO
FOR FIRST CLASS SHOE
REPAIRING
go to
J. N. FRIEDMAN
HARNESS SHOP
JOHN W. STEVENSON, M. D.
Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat
Glasses Fitted
Office of Dr. Aspray, 303 3rd Ave.
Phone 177
FINEST LINE OF HIGH GRADE
WOOLENS. YOUR INSPECTION
SOLICITED
O. H. SCHWARZ, Tailor.
j. a. McDaniel
Moscow, Idaho
Dentist
Phone 229
i
j
LATAH COUNTY
TITLE & TRUST COMPANY
Abstracts of Title Conveyancing
Mortgage Loans
Thompson Insurance Agency
Fire Insurance, Automobile and
Plate Glass Insurance, Fidelity and
Casualty Bonds
J. G. Vennigerholz, Prop.
Moscow, Idaho.
Get the Genuine,
and Avoid
Wasto,^

©
Ji^conomy
In Every Cake
1-2 j
|
,
of the household sugar allotments from
of three pounds to four pounds monthly,
WASHINGTON, Nov. 13.—Increase
in the beet sugar producing states
in cane producing territory of Louisiana
effective December 1, has been
nounced by the food administration.
In the remainder of the country
allotment of three pounds a month
household and three pounds to 90 meals
for public eating places will be continued.
The increase for sugar producing
states is granted because of lack
carrying space for overseas shipment, to
gether with insufficient storage facilities
in this country.
"When an American boy puts on
a soldier's or a sailor's uniform,
y'understand a way-up expert could
no more tell by looking at him from
the outside whether he is a Catholic,
a Protestant, or a Jew, as whether
he is a tenor, a barytone, or a bass,
and also, Mawruss, they don't care,
Mawruss, because since May 1917,
the people of the United States in
or out of uniform has only had just
one religion, Mawruss, and that is:
to win the war, and practically every
body belongs to the orthodox branch
of that religion too."—Abe Potash.
YOUR
MONEY
Draws interest when
deposited in this bank.
It earns nothing when
carried around in your
pocket.
FIRST TRUST
& SAVINGS BANK
Inland Market
10,000 chickens
wanted. Highest
market price paid.
Monuments
i
THE MOSCOW MARBLE
WORKS
George H. Moody, Proprietor
I
Has the finest line of Monuments
and all Kinds of Marble Work to
be found in the Inland Empire
PRICES REASONABLE
See Our Work Before Ordering
v 'ctrolas and
Victor Records
Sherfey's Book Store
V
Moscow, Idaho
If It's New We Are Sure tbe
First to Have It
Hotel Moscow *
TOM WRIGHT, Prop.
$

r
*
V
*
*
*
i Thoroughly Modern *
FIRST CLASS GRILL
^ AUTO BUS AT ALL TRAINS *
4
*
*
4*
J
You will find you save more
and live better if you trade at
the
THIRD STREET
MARKET
CHICKENS, GEESE, DUCKS
AND HIDES WANTED |
L. M. KITLEY
PHONE 248
CLASSIFIED ADS
and
HELP WANTED—Female
WANTED — COMPETENT GIRL
for general housework. Mrs. Geo.
Phone 62J; corner 1st and
35-tf.
an
for
of
Weber.
Van Buren.
FOB RENT—Rooms
FOR RENT —A ROOM WITH OR
without sleeping porch ; hot and cold
''ater; modern conveniences; price rea
• nahe. 425 East Third St. Mrs. D.
quhart.
r
13tf
t
FOR RENT —1 HOUSEKEEPING
suite; also sleeping room.
105W. 317 South Jefferson.
CaH
37-48
FOR RENT—FURNISHED APART
ments and furnished rooms at
Eggan's apartments. Phone 206H.
231-tf
FOR RENT—ONE LARGE 3-ROOM
apartment, $15; one 3-room apart
ment, slightly smaller, $12; one
2-room apartment, $10; one 2-room
apartment, $9; two furnished rooms,
$7. 310 South Lilly. Phone 338.
,
29-tf
V
FOR TRADE
WANTED—TO EXCHANGE O
two bottom 14-inch gang plow
three bdttom. Phone 9251. J. H. Dye.
289-kf
m
4
FOR RENT—Houses
FOR RENT—A 7-ROOM MODERN
house, close in. C. H. Fatten. 43-55
FOR RENT—AN 8-ROOM MODERN
house near the domitory. Phone 170J.
Mrs. John Shannon.
3tf
FOR RENT—2-ACRE TRACT WITH
5-room house, cheap. Phone 290R.
32tf
FOR SALE—Livestock
FOR SALE-ONE LARGE SORRÈL
horse, 6 years old, weight 1300 lbs.;
6 years old, weight 1300 lbs.; horse
for $100.00. E. A.
phone 9268.
Hendrickson,
40-46
FOR SALE—Poultry
FOR SALE—FINE BOURBON RED
turkeys, sired by first prize winner
at world's fair.
Phone 9153.
Mrs. E. R. Headley,
41-tf
WANTED—Miscellaneous
WANTED—20 CARS OF U. S.
Grade No. 1 White and Russet
potatoes. Phone or write Garfield
Fruit & Produce Co., Garfield, Wash.
_____40-tf
WANTED—GOOD LIVE DEALER
to sell the best truck on the market
Can make deliveries I to 5 tons. Write
Rochester Motor Co., 1012 Sprague
Ave., Spokane. Wash.
23S-tf
*
WANTED TO RENT—AN OFFICE
desk. Telephone 352.
291-tf
WANTED—100 TONS GOOD PEA
or write Garfield
Fruit & Produce Co., Garfield, Wash.
_ 40-tf
straw.
Call
r
WANTED TO BUY A FIRST CLASS
cow. Phone 917X3.
40-46
FOR SALE—Real Estate
FOR TRADE —IMPROVED TWO
acres for small car. Phone 290R. 3ltf
FOR SALE—A 5-ROOM MODERN
residence: good cellar and
Phone 263H. Fred Stone.
garage.
16-tf
FOR SALE—8-ROOM MODERN
residence; choice location, corner lot.
garage, etc. Phone 267Y. Sam Silvey.
______ 255-tf.
FOR SALE — HOUSE AND LOT,
corner First and Polk Sts. Inquire
^ 244V
Mrs. Wm. Arnètt.
FOR SALE
80 ACRES THREE
miles east of Moscow; house and barn.
Write E. R. Fuller, Lewiston, Idaho, or
N. G. Gilbertson, adjoining farm. 6tf
see
<4
FOR SALE—Miscellaneous
FOR SALE—A HAND POWER VAC
uum cleaner and good Edison
phonograph and records. Phone 24R
!42-48
V
FOR SALE—SIDWAY BABY CAR
nage. Phone 134J.41-46
FOR SALE—24 HEAD SHROPSHIRE
sheep. Write A. E. Alexander. Pho»
Farmer 942KS.
32«
jpLINE-KNIGHT 7-PASSENG»
touring car, in good condition, for «ie
r trade.
Moscow Auto & Supply Co.
283ff
FOR SALE—1 DEERING BINDER;
sell for cash or trade in stock. M. J.
Schu, Moscow, Id aho. Rt. 3.
SELDEN TRUCKS SOLD ON DE
ferred payment plan. Write Rochester
Motor Co., 1012 Sprague Ave., Spo
kane, Wash. 235-tf
f44tf
FOR SALE—1 LEATHER LOUNGE,
1 bookcase, 1 oak cliillonier, 1 oak
table, 2 mattresses, 2 oak rockers. 1
bird's eye maple bedstead, 3 crocks, 1
woven wric spring.
Phone 274L.
720 Idaho street.
42tf
MISCELLANEOUS
WANTED—A BUGGY WITH TOP.
Phone 9311. 43-49
THOSE WISHING ODD JOBS DONE
phone Ray Stevens, c-o Plummer's
__ 26-tf
Cafe.
<. -
PERSONS NEEDING A GOOD
home for the winter; also a good
place for pigs and chickens, call on
B. C. Dowdy in Orchard Lane. Log
wood free in the timber; house partly
furnished. Lorenzo Wood, Pullman,
Wn. 41 . 43
n.

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