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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, November 20, 1918, Image 1

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The Daily Star-Mirror
TOLUME ym
MOSCOW, LATAH COUNTY, IDAHO WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1918
NUMBER 48
GERMANY MAD 1,580,000 SOLDIERS KILLED
Germany's loss in killed, wounded and missing from the beginning of the
war to October 1, one month and 11 days before the war ended, reached the
■enormous total of 6,330,000. As the last 42 days of fighting were severe
and the Germans were on the defensive, the additional losses during that
period must have been very heavy. Germany's loss in killed, alone, up to
October 1, was 1,680,000, as compared with England's loss of 668,656 killed
up to the close of the war. Included in Germany's list of casualties is 260,000
"whose fate is unknown." If these were killed it will bring the total death
list well above one and three quarters a million men.
Today the Germans delivered 20 submarines to the allies 30 miles off the
EngKsh coast. This is supposed to be not more than 10 per cent of the
number to be delivered, but the delivery shows good faith on the part of
Germany and it is believed the others will be delivered within the specified
time.
r England serves notice on Germany that if she wants food for her alleged
Étarving population she must g'ive English prisoners better treatment. The
notice wai sent to Berlin by wireless. It is significant of the English frame
of mind.
■ i:s.;
following are the telegraphic and cable dispatches received today:
Germany Lost 1,580,000 Killed.
COPENHAGEN.—Up to October 1 there were 1,680,000 German soldiers
killed and the fate of 260,000 is unknown, according to the Vorwaerts, of
Berlin, which says it learns this on good authority.
Four million German soldiers were wounded, some of them several times.
There were 490,000 Germans (prisoners) in hostile countries.
American Troops are in Germany.
WITH THE AMERICAN ARMY OF OCCUPATION.—(By Associated
Press.)—American troops shoved a leg across the German frontier today at
points opposite Briey and Andun-le-Roman and points between these places.
Farther north the Duchy of Luxemburg was entered in the direction of the
city of Luxemburg.
1-*
i
England Serves Notice on Hungry Germany.
LONDON.—(By British Wireless.)—In any queston of provisioning Ger
many the British government will be obliged to take into account the con
ditions under which British prisoners in Germany are being released, unless
cruel treatment of prisoners is discontinued, the German government was
warned in a wireless message today.
German Revolutionists Oppose Assembly.
LONDON.—The Berlin soldiers and workmen's council has passed reso
lutions against summoning a constituent assembly, says the Exchange Tele
graph dispatches from Copenhagen.
The'council demands a summoning of the general soldiers and workmen's
in order to take decision as to the future of Germany."
Twenty German Submarines Delivered Today.
LONDON.—Twenty German submarines were surrendered to Rear Ad
miral Reginald Tyrchittj 30 m'iles off Harwich at sunrise this morning,
according to a Press Association dispatch. These are the first submarines
that have been surrendered to the allies by Germany. ■
• c Ukranian Government Has Been Unseated.
COPENHAGEN.—The Ukranian government has been overturned and
Kiev has been captured by troops from Astrakhan, according to Kiev dis
/ i
congress
patches to Swedish newspapers.
The Ukranian national assembly has fled and a provisional government
has been established by the captors of the city who apparently are com
manded by General Denkine, leader of the anti-Bolsheviki forces.
Shipping Losses for October Small.
LONDON, Via Montreal.—Allied and neutral shipping losses for October
totalled 93,000 tons, the British admiralty announced today. The British
losses were 84,000 tons.
• President to Go to France in Style.
WASHINGTON.—Naval officials said today that President Wilson and
» the American delegation to the peace conference will cross the Atlantic
of the big army transports, convoyed by a dreadnaught and a flotilla
Plans of the trip are uncompleted but it is regarded as
on one
of destroyers.
certain the vessel carrying the official party will be one of the great pas
liners taken over for the movemnt of troops.
Will Continue Naval Exjansion.
senger
WASHINGTON.—Continued naval expansion by the United States without
regard at present for the possible decisions of the peace conference for the
formation of a league of nations or reduction of armament, was recommended
today by Secretary of the Navy Daniels at a private conference with the
house naval committee which is now framing the 1920 naval appropriation
bill.
Discussions with Secretary Daniels largely concerned the league of nations
and disarmament called for in President Wilson's peace principles. Daniels
insisted that construction proceed because these questions are for future
« settlement and no one can foresee the decision.
, "'da
American Casualties 1399.
There are 1399 names in the American army casualty lists issued today,
of whom 261 were killed in action. There are three Idaho soldiers named
One of these
i in the lists, two killed in action and one died of wounds.
' is a Latah county man. Following is the casualty list issued for morning
papers today:
Killed in action, 146; died of wounds, 118; died of disease, 45; wounded
severely, 131; wounded, degree undetermined, 63; wounded slightly, 223;
missing in action, 42; prisoners, 14; total, 772.
Afternoon List.—Killed in action, 117 ; died of wounds, 27; died of accident
and other causes, 5; died of disease, 100; wounded, degree undetermined, 227;
wounded slightly, 95; missing in action, 62; prisoners, 4; total, 627.
Idaho's Roll of Honor.
Delbert Clark, St. Anthony, died of disease.
Erick F. Jorgeson, Preston, Idaho, killed in action.
Martin Mattson, Troy, Idaho, killed in action.
NOT ENOUGH SHIPS IN THE
WORLD TO SUPPLY THE IM
MEDIATE DEMANDS
BOISE.—Ships must come and ships
must go loaded with supplies of all kinds
for the men of this country overseas,
according to the United States shipping
board which has notified the state coun
cil of defense of Idaho, the people must
not think that their duty with relation
to the war is over.
The statement of the shipping board is
follows, as issued by Director Hurley :
"Now that the armistice has been
■signed and the end of the war is in
sight a statement roughly outlining the
plans of the shipping board is in order.
The continued need for building Ameri
can-owned tonnage is obvious. Not only
must we continue to supply our armies
overseas and prepare to bring them home
at the earliest moment compatible with
safety, but Europe must be fed and sup
plied with the necessary materials to per
mit the reconstruction of devastated
areas in order that both our friends and
our enemies may become selfsupporting
as
and the burden of feeding the world
taken from our shoulders.
"There are not enough ships in the
world to carry on this work and to pro
vide immediately for ordinary commerce.
For that reason only a limited portion
of the shipping which can be constructed
by us in 1919 will be available for use in
the ordinary commercial channels. For
two months the shipping board has been
making a complete resurvey of its con
struction program and contracts. Be
lieving that the emergency war pressure
which necessitated the speediest con
struction possible would soon end, the
investigation has been with a view to re
planning the ships to be constructed from
this date forward.
"It is planned that from now on ships
will be built with special reference to
the economical cost of operation, in
cluding -the motive power, cargo, space
and speed. It is also planned that'tbese
shall be built with reference to probable
trade uses and trade lines so as to adapt
them to particular uses and to increase
the speed every unnecessary delay in
loading and unloading must be elimi
nated. "
» !
TWO GREAT TELEGRAPH
COMPANIES CONSOLIDATED
WASHINGTON.—Consolidation of
services of the Western Union and
the Postal telegraph companies under
government control announced by
Postmaster General Burleson, Way,
effective December 1, next.
SMS DRIFT HORSES
WILL HAVE FUTURE
DEAN E. J. IDDINGS OF UNIVER
SITY ADVISES RAISING
BETTER HORSES
So much has been said and written
in favor of high priced tractors
place of horses for farm work, and
the agents of these machines have
been so busily engaged in trying
make people believe that the horse
doomed, that it is refreshing to read
a statement from a known authority
on horses and their future. Dean
E. J. Iddings, head of the agricultural
college of the University of Idaho, and
admittedly one of the best authorities
on the horse in the west, has the
following article in this week's issue
of the Idaho Farmer. His article
follows :
The emergency of the last couple
years has given a highly favorable
opportunity for the growth of interest
in mechanical forms of power for use
on the farm. The various makes
tractors have had powerful organiza
tions behind them, and have to the
fullest taken advantage of the oppor
tunity afforded,
tractor has been advertised as
means of speeding up work on ftie
farm, as a means of doing more than
might be done with horses and as
vehicle through which service might
be rendered to the nation in connec
tion with its program for making
war.
As a result, the
As a result of the work of all of
these influences the tractor has ob
tained greater attention and has made
greater progress in securing the in
terest of the public than might have
been possible during a much longer
time had the nation been at peace.
Those interested in the live stock
producing industry are naturally won
dering what effect this increased pub
lic interest and popularity of the
tractor has had and will have on horse
breeding. The writer is of the opin
' that there has been a lessening
of interest in the problems of horse
breeding. There has probably been
less of a disposition to buy the best of
stallions. There has been somewhat
of a careless attitude in the selection
Of a stallion for use on the mares of
the farm, and in general there has
been a lack, in some districts at least,
of a highly ambitious attitude to
breed only the best of mares to the
best of stallions, with the idea of
securing constantly better horses for
public service.
Many men may not feel that this
point of View is correct, but it seems
probable that the unprecedented sale
of tractors has been unfortunate for
the horse business, and, in many
cases, has been, to say the least, of
no advantage so far as the future of
a tractor is concerned. First of all,
farmers have felt that it would
ion
many
only be a question
would no longer be in demand, and
have taken less pride and paid less
attention to their horses than for
merly. So far as the tractor is con
cerned, it has been sold to some men,
undoubtedly, who will never make
success with the tractor, and in the
enthusiasm of the moment has been
taken by many men who have thought
that it would do much more than it
can ever hope to do. Many men will
be disappointed, naturally, in the re
sult, and if they come back to horses
they will undoubtedly need to start
at the bottom and build up a horse
supply anew.
That the tractor has a future can
not be successfully questioned. Many
of the most enthusiastic horsemen of
today are recommending the tractor
because it will do some heavy work
and save the horses thereby. It will
work in the busy season and supple
ment the horse power on the farm,
and its use for belt power is also
an important factor on a large num
ber of farms. The important thing
is that many men think that the
tractor can entirely supplant the
horse and can work at any season and
on almost any farm. There are un
doubtedly many farms of the west
that will never successfully operate
tractors.
It will be many years, if at all, be
fore the horse is other than the big
gest source of power on the farm. It
(Continued on page four.)
IP
Time to Fumigate
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H. I). MARTIN GOES TO FRANCE
FOR Y. M. C. A. WORK
H. D. Martin, pioneer of Latah
county, who has lived in and near
Moscow for 39 years, left today for
France to take up Y. M. C. A. work.
He left at 10:45 on the Northern Pa
cific for Spokane and goes direct to
New York, where he will embark for
France next week. He is due in New
York on November 26.
Mr. Martin has been food admini
strator for Latah county since the of
fice was established. He resigned and
T. A. Meeker, another pioneer, form
er owner of the telephone sytem here,
has accepted the position and took
over the work today. Mr. Martin
leave his wife and three children in
Moscow, JJe expects to remain in
France as long as hêêded and has
been informed that his services Will
probably be reqired for at least
year.
i
INFLUENZA BAN IS
OFFICIALLY LIFTED
STATE HEALTH OFFICER
THANKS COUNTY BOARDS
FOR EFFICIENT ACTION
BOISE.—Orders have been issued by
the state board of health to lift the
Spanish influenza ban which has been
in effect in this state for a month as a
precautionary measure against the spread
of the epidemic, on November 24. Like
many other states. Idaho' decided to close
down churches, public schools, theaters
and all public meeting places in order to
guard against spread of the disease. The
order lifting the ban, as issued by Dr.
E. T. Biwer, secretary and executive of
ficer of the state board of health, to the
chairmen of all county health boards, is
as follows :
"You are advised that all restrictions
of the state board of health for the con
trol of the epidemic of influenza are to
be removed at 1 a. m. Sunday morning,
November.24. insofar as is safe within
your jurisdiction.
"Reparts received by this office indi-.
cate that for the « state as a whole, the
incidence of influenza is rapidly dimin
ishing, which explains the above order.
"While sporadic cases will doubtless
develop for a considerable ' period, and
while in some isolated sections, influ
enza may still attain epidemic propor
tions, we believe that the present strin
gent requirements may be done away
with.
"You are directed, however, to use all
care in handling the situation within
your jurisdiction and if in the judgment
of the local board of health, the time is
not ripe for removal of restrictions, you
authorized to maintain them for the
are
present.
"I wish to thank you, and, through
you, the public generally for the splendid
co-operation that has been shown the
Mate board of health during this abnor
mal situation."
HONE) 10 MH
POLAND CHINA SOW SELLS FOR
$88.50—OTHER HOGS BRING
$30 EACH
Hagan & Cushing, proprietors of the
big packing plant here, today paid C. O.
Grendahl $88.50 for one hog. The ani
mal was a Poland China sow, weighing
610 pounds. There was a 20-pound
dock and the price paid was 15 cents a
pound. The animal was delivered to the
company's packing plant just north of
town.
The firm bought 36 head of young
hogs from Armbruster & Taylor, raised
on Mr. Armbruster's farm near town,
for which a check for $1080, an average
of just $30 each, was given. The hogs
weighed 185 pounds each and the price
paid was 16 cents a pound. The hogs
were a fine lot of young animals and in
prime condition.
EXPECTED SOON
BUT SOME SCHOOLS MAY NOT
OPEN NEXT MONDAY BE
CAUSE OF INFLUENZA
School may not open in all districts
in Latah county next Monday, although
the state quarantine will be lifted Sun
day. Influenza has just made its appear
ance in some of the districts and is
spreading. One district which has not
had the disease at all until three days
ago reports seven new cases and the
directors asked Mrs. R. ß. Knepper,
county school superintendent, what they
should do about opening school. She in
structed the directors to use their own
judgment about it and if they deem it
unsafe to open school Monday they may
keep the school closed until such time
as it is thought safe to reopen it.
School will open in Moscow and in
nearly every district in the county Mon
day. Churches will hold services Sun
day for the first time in several weeks.
The motion pictures are arranging to
reopen Monday evening and the chamber
of commerce will give its regular week
ly luncheon at noon on Tuesday. Lodges,
which have held no meetings since the
quarantine went into effect, will resume
regular meetings next week and condi
tions are expected to become normal be
fore the end of the week.
Many students of the University of
Idaho, who have been out since the quar
antine started, secured health certificates
from Dr. W. A. Adair, city health of
ficer, last night and'were permitted to
enter classes this morning. No new
cases of influenza are reported in town
today.
B
RESOLUTIONS ARE
COUNTY COUNCIL OF DEFENSE
REGRETS BUT ACCEPTS MAR
TIN'S RESIGNATION
The defense council at its meeting last
evening passed the following resolution
as a token of appreciation on the part of
the council and the people of Latah coun
ty of the services rendered by H. D.
Martin as county food administrator.
Mr. Martin has given his services with
out compensation to the people of the
county during the past year:
Whereas, H. D. Martin has tendered
his resignation as county food adminis
trator of Latah county, state of Idaho ;
and
Whereas. As such administrator he
has served the people of said county
faithfully, giving his time, energy and
funds without compensation or reim
bursement during a time of great na
tional stress : now therefore be it
Resolved, That this council for and on
behalf of the people of Latah county
extend to the said H. D. Martin the
sincere appreciation of the loyal citizens
of the county for the faithful services
rendered: and be it further
Resolved, That a copy of these reso
lutions be sent to H. D. Martin and a
copy given to the press of the city.
"LATAH COUNTY DE
FENSE COUNCIL,
"By L. F. PARSINS,
"Chairman."
Mr. Martin left this morning for New
York, where he will embark for France
to work as a representative of the Y. M.
C. A.
Mr. Martin tendered his resignation
as county food administrator to State
Administrator Bicknell some days ago to
take up this new position. Word has
been received that T. A- Meeker has
been appointed state food administrator
to fill the position made vacant by Mr.
Martin's resignation.
1ST SHOP EARLY
IN SPOKANE STORES
MERCHANTS WILL NOT KÉEP
STORES OPEN LATE FOR
CHRISTMAS SHOPPERS
SPOKANE, Wash. — Sweeping re
forms in the handling of Christmas shop
ping have been adopted by virtually all
merchants of Spokane acting through
their retail trade bureau. All lines of
merchandise are reached by the agree
ment which was made in deference to
the wishes of the war industries board
and which will be adhered to in spite of
the fact that the war has ended and the
"flu" ban has been lifted.
Stores will close during the pre-holiday
period at 6 o'clock, instead of remaining
open until 9 or 10 p. m.. as has hereto
fore been- customary. No extra clerks
will be required as the early announce
ment of the change in custom is ex
pected to distribute holiday buyers
throughout the several weeks before
Christmas. In fact, many merchants are
already advertising holiday goods. It
has been further agreed by the retail
trade bureau to unitedly and individually
advocate the buying of useful and essen
tial gifts. Such gifts will be featured
in all displays. Unnecessary and extrav
agant articles will be kept in the back
ground or completely forgotten. Ameri
can-made toys for children are, however,
to be regarded as essentials.
DEFENSE COUNCIL
MAKES AN APPEAL
L. F. PARSONS, CHAIRMAN, ASKS
THAT LATAH COUNTY RAISE
ITS FULL QUOTA
To the Public* '
The united war fund drive is going
slowly. There is a tendency to depre
ciate the importance of this drive. The
cessation of hostilities apparently is
causing a great many to lose interest in
''Our Boys" and to ignore their quotas
entirely or to subscribe but a small part
thereof. As a result Latah is far from
reaching its quota.
The matter was given serious consider
ation by the council of defense at its
regular meeting last night. It was the
sense of the council that Latah should
meet its original quota of $22,000. That
while it was called upon to oversubscribe
this quota by 50 per cent, it was the
sense of the council that the ending of
the war made the oversubscription un
necessary, but considering it very im
portant that the county meet the quota
of $22,000. It was unanimously voted
that the drive be kept open until this
amount had been raised.
Latah has had an enviable record—
standing 100 per cent in all previous
drives—and it is felt that Moscow and
Latah county cannot afford to put a blot
on that record at this time.
The council asked that each individual
do his part in keeping that record clear
by doing his part. It called upon the
people to forget all partisan feeling in
the matter. The money subscribed is
not for any sect or creed, but for the
boys who have offered their all and
have been instrumental in bringing the
war tc an early and successful close.
The failure of Latah county to do its
part in this drive can and would be con
strued as a lack of appreciation for the ,
services rendered by our boys and a
black mark on her 100 per cent war
recorcT,
Can Latah afford to fall down? Your
answer will be recorded by your sub
scription.
LATAH COUNTY DE
FENSE COUNCIL,
L. F. PARSONS,
Chairman.
A GREAT HOLIDAY
WANTS FOUR GOVERNORS TO
EAT THANKSGIVING DINNER
IN THAT CITY
SPOKANE, Wash. — Governors of
four states have been invited to Spokane
to participate in the three-day Thanks
giving celebration planned as a period of
rejoicing over the winning of the war.
All of the Inland Empire towns have
held impromptu celebrations and it is
being thought advisable to invite the citi
zens from all of this big region to have
a still more elaborate observance at the
central city. Now that the "flu" ban
has also been lifted there seems extra
occasion for rejoicing.
The plans call for special services in
all of the churches, beginning at 9 o'clock
on Thanksgiving day, a state luncheon in
honor of the governors and their official
parties at 1 p. m. ; mass meeting and
unveiling of victory statue at 3 p. m. ;
formal state ball 9 p. m. The second
day will be signalized by a big street
pageant typifying victory over the cen
tral powers. In the çyçpiag ft publiç „•
I concert and dance will lie neld at the
armory with the United States Marine
band providing the music, Saturday
crowds will witness the one big football
game to be held in the Northwest this
year between Mare Island marines and
the University of Idaho. Other features
arc to be added.
Extending an invitation to the Inland
Empire generally, Frank Sweeny, chair
man of the victory celebration commit
tee, says :
"People of the Inland Empire have
been saving their money for three years
or more of war. and this celebration of
victory should mark the return of pros
perity. The Inland Empire is prosper
ous and we want folks from all points
to come to Spokane and have a good
time next week. The people have been
staying at home, denying themselves
luxuries, and often necessities, to help
win the war. Now the war is won they
should give themselves a big holiday."
REV. J. QUINCY BIGGS
MAY BE ARMY CHAPLAIN
Rev. J. Quincy Biggs, pastor of the
Moscow Christian church, returned
last night from Fort George Wright,
Spokane, where he passed a success
ful physical and mental examination
for the position of chaplain in the
army. He had been accepted for
the work two weeks ago and was
instructed to go to Spokane and take
the examination. Captain Coffey, of
Fort George Wright, sent the Rev.
Mr. Biggs' papers east at once and
said that he has little doubt that the
minister will be called to service even
though the war has ended for there
is said to be a shortage of chaplains
and many of those who have been en
gaged in the work since the early
part of the war, wili want to return.
The Rev. Mr. Biggs was formerly
pastor of the Dean Avenue Christian
church of Spokane. He came to Mos
cow early this year. He will hold
himself in readiness to go whenever
called. If accepted as chaplain he
will be given the rank of first lieu
tenant.

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