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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, November 20, 1918, Image 2

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The DAILY STAR-MIRROR
Published every evening except Sun
day, at Moscow, Idaho.
GEO. N. LAMPHERE, Publisher.
The Official Newspaper of the City of
Moscow.
Entered as second-class matter Oct.
16, 1911, at the postoffice of Moscow,
Idaho, under the Act of Congress of
March, 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Deliverd by carrier to any part of city :
Per Month .
Three Months
Six Months .
m jOne Year ...
60c
$1.50
2.76
5.00
By Mail
Î outside of city and on rural routes):
'er Month .40c
Three Months .
.$1.16
2.25
Bix Months
One Year .
4.00
The (Weekly) Idaho Post:
$L50
Fer Year
MEMBER OF ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively
entitled to the use for republication
•of all news-dispatches credited to it
or not otherwise credited in this paper
and also the local news published
therein.
All rights of republication of
special dispatches herein are also re
aerved.
THE LAMP AND NOT THE TORCH.
With the kaiser a fugitive, his throne
gone, his imperial moustache points
drooping, Germany is cry'fng for a speedy
signing of the peace terms to keep her
people from starving. The natural im
pulse is for us to say; 'Thou hast said
that he was God ; let thy God protect
thee."
Scorn is the natural expression that
comes with the hour. But it must be
a righteous scorn. It must not be a
scorn which would leave a German babe
to die because an Armenian babe died.
It was the antithesis of this idea that we
fought in the war, if President Wilson
expressed the heart
United States, as he did. Without any
expression of maudlin sympathy, the
Christian world will recogniz.e that a
spectre is the same whether it appears
before the innocent in Germany or be
fore the innocent in Armenia. To think
otherwise is to think as the Indian and
Turk think.
The truly great revenge will he to
show to the German commoir people the
great error they labored under at the
behest of their leaders, as followers of
the German kulture, as mad Molochs.
The truly great revenge will make them
pay pound for pound, stone for stone,
for ruined Belgium. But the truly great
revenge must not take the lives of babes
in the streets of'Berlin either by the.
sword or by- starvation, which is worse
than the sword, because babes in Bel
gium died with bayonets through their
tender flesh. We must make this great
distinction between the guilty 'and the
innocent upon«whioh the law rests.
The peace terms will he as the war
was—firm, decisive and like the mills of
the 1 gods. But the thought of destruc
tion must with the cessation of war also
perish with the sword.— Pend D'Oreille
Review.
MEETING IS NECESSARY.
One of the most important meetings
to be held as soon as the influenz.a ban
is lifted is the convention of delegates of
the North Idaho Chambers of Commerce.
At this meeting every city, town and dis
trict III the ten northern counties of the
state should he represented by practical
business men. Men who are too busy to
listen to glittering platitude^ but who )
will not he backward in expressing their
thoughts, desires, hopes and also their
fears. If such a meeting is held it will
be of inestimable value to our legislators.
North Idaho is facing conditions which
,
are new. To this wonderful section
country will come thousands of dis
charged soldiers and sailors. These men
will not he overburdened with worldly
goods, hut will he filled with the same
desire that urged our forefathers to come
west to build their homes. There is
room for these men but steps must be
taken to help them. In this county alone
there arc wonderful opportunities await
ing development, hut there must he or
ganiz.ation. We have oversubscribed
every bond issue, and donation. Now
that war is ended and we all Hhve a
bond or two tucked away, let us not
stop, but when bonds are issued for im
provements let them he in small denomi
nations so that we may buy them a id
develop our own country. Let the dele
gates suggest what improvements will
be most advantageous, and not stop there,
but continue until they are completed.
The meeting should be free from long
winded talks and banqueting, but full of
practical business.— Coeur d'Alene Press,
te te
tWHY IS THE COLONEL SILENT?
Mr. Roosevelt has passed judgment on
the elections without paying special heed
to Mr. Ford's remarkable run in Michi
gan. Mr. Ford seems to be defeated by
some 5000 votes in a state that gave Mr.
Roosevelt 227,000 plurality for president
in 1904 and which is credited with a
normal republican plurality of 100,000.
Ifr. Roosevelt again carried Michigan
In 1912 as an independent against all
Other candidates. Of all states Michigan
on its record would seem to be in com
pletc sympathy with the colonel. What
is the matter with this Michigan that it
•O far modifies the Rooseveltlan taste
• im war candidates as almost to elect
Henry Ford to the United States senate
on the democratic ticket? Mr. Ford's
run can hardly be dismissed as "personal
popularity" in view of the man's views
on war and peace which have been so
bitterly criticized—and at times justly
criticized, in our opinion. — Springfield
(Mass.) Republican.
GIVES WILSON GREAT CREDIT.
It docs not appear that the president
of the United tSates would think of
claiming the overthrow of the Hohenzol
lern dynasty and the downfall of the
monarchy in the Prussia of Frederick
the Great as a personal victory, yet fhd
verdict of historians will have to be that
no one of the ruling statesmen among
Germany's foes in this war aimed at the
German kaiser so directly and so per
sistently as did Mr. Wilson. The abdi
cation of William II and the smashing
of the Hohcnzollern family as a ruling
house are the results of a political and
diplomatic offensive which Mr. Wilson
more than any other man conceived and
directed.—Springfield (Mass.) Republi
can.
fs: Kc Mr
The corn crop, according to this
month's government estimate, has in
creased some 32,000,000 bushels over a
month ago, the total being 2,749.198,000
bushels. Last year's corn crop totaled
3,159,500.000 bushels; but much of it was
inferior in quality. The conclusion is
that while this year's crop is not up to
the country's hopes in size, it by no
means means a "crop failure."—Spring
field Republican.
pa » '
Three tilings that should not be for
gotten in the peace terms:
The' banishment of the Kaiser.
The execution of Von Tirpitz.
The imprisonment of Von Bissing in
Belgium prison.
The execution of a Turk or two.—
Pend D'Oreille Review.
me
HEALTH HINTS BY
TELLS HOW TO KEEP THE MEN
IN CAMPS FROM BECOM
ING ILL
The following letter was sent to the
editor of the Argonaut by Lieutenant
Lyle J. Meehan, with the request that
it be published in this issue:
"Dear Sir: I have been working
the Army camps and realize there
ahoulô-be some systematic effort made
to keep the boys well, but this seems
to be left to his own discussion along
the lines mentioned below.
"In most cases a boy's own ability
to make up his bed properly and to
keep covered properly (especially in
the morning hours when it is coldest)
seems to be the one thing in life
where he displays absolutely no
ability.
"I am sure a thorough investiga
tion in each camp would suggest the
cause and a means of preventing per
haps one-half of the present low rate
of sickness.
<(T . , ,, , ., , ,
I have been through the bunk
house where the boys were sleeping
(with the atmosphere such that an
overcoat would be comfortable) and
saw feet, arms, legs, chests and
rumps uncovered, and Ï qm surprised
there is not more siojepess than there
Just from this cause alone.
"This exposure night after night
«.I. i j j. 4 .-, .e- i j -
leaves the body a fertile field for any
§erms that ale prevalent.
"I am sure there should be an or
derly in each biihk house to see that
the boys keep covered properly in
the morning hours.
"I would suggest that in cases
where three blankets are not enough
a boy should be allowed more and
that he should be made to understand
that the things he needs to keep him
well and healthy is not only his privi
lege to ask for, but his duty.
"I would also suggest that in mak
ing his bed at night he lay one-half
of the first blanket at the left side
of the cot, then the same way on the
right side, and so on; then after he
has retired on the half of the blankets
that are on the cot he can throw the
half from the right side over him,
then the half from the left, then from
the tight, and then from the left.
"This makes it nearly impossible
for the cold air to get to the body,
but I would suggest a still better way
would be to let each boy sew up one
side and one one end of his blankets
and tuck one inside the other, this
would make it impossible for him to
get uncovered.
"Even under these precautions, if
the night orderly sees that any certain
boy is constantly catching cold his
case should be dealt with accordingly.
"I will conclude that the death rate
of the Army is low compared with
other wars, but why should we stop
when thousands of more lives can be
saved at such a small cost, and we
need our hospitals for the wounded.
"Thanking you for a conscientious
study of these facts, I remain yours
for the safeguarding of the boy who
has given his life i or our cause.
"I make this plei. for the mothers
and sisters at home, who would will
ingly give their own lives instead.
"O. D. HOLMES,
"921 Sixth St., N. W."
ASE
UNIVERSITY UNION
GIVEN HIGH PRAISE
DBmN ELDRIDGE TELLS OF AM
ERICAN COLLEGE ASSOCIA
TION IN PARIS
Dean J. Q. Eldridge speaks en
thusiastically of the American " Uni
versity Union, established in Paris,
of which the University 6t Idaho is a
member. Dean Eldridge ip the fol
lowing interesting interview gives the
history of the Union and the work
being done: .
"When Yale University found that
they had five or six thousand stu
dents and alumni in the war,'' said
Dean Eldridge, "they decided to send
over to Paris to Professor George H.
Nettleton of the department of - Eng
lish, getting him to operate a Yale
Bureau for their men in the service.
Other universities, on learning of this
move of Yale University, decided to
cooperate and establish bureaus for
their institutions. Out of this idea
grew the American University Union,
which now is comprised of over two
hundred of the leading- universities
and colleges of America.
U. of I. is Member.
"The University of Idaho has been
a member for one year, the annual
membership fee of one hundred dol
lars having been voluntarily subscrib
ed by the faculty. Membership in
the Union entitles the members of
a university to use all the privileges
of the club. When a man's relations
friends want to find out where he
is, a letter written to the Union will
bring the information wanted, if it is
possible at all.
In Heart of Paris.
"The Union occupies a large hotel
building in the heart of Paris, eight
rue de Richelieu, just off the Avenue
Del Opera; the building was formerly
the Royal Palace Hotel. The hotel
is composed of a lobby, dining room,
bed rooms, and a library. At all
times it is full of young American of
ficers and soldiers. It is the only
place in Europe, perhaps, where mili
tary salutes are unknown, for the at
mosphere is entirely democratic. In
the hotel are many thousands of rec
ord books where a man registers; he
must put down his university, class,
year, and frat, if he has any.
♦ + + ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
MARKETS


The following market quotations
are the prices paid to tho producer
by the dealer and are changed daily,
thus giving the public the accurate
quotations in all classes of grain,
produce and meats.
, Hay and Grain
Wheat, Bluest.em No. 1, bulk,
net, delivered to warehouses $2.02)4
Wheat, Bluestem, No. 1, sacked
net, delivered to warehouses 2-11)4
Wheat, Fortyfold, Ne. 1, bulk,
net, delivered to warehouses 2.02)4
Wheat, Fortyfold, No. 1, sTced,
net, delivered to warehouses 2.11)4
Wheat, White Club, No. 1 bulk,
net, delivered to warehouses 2.00)4
Wheat, White Club, No. 1, s'ked
net, delivered to warehouses 2.09)4
Wheat, Red Russian. No. 1 bulk
. , , .
net, delivered to warehouses 1.97)4
wheat, Red Russian, No. 1 sV<J
net, delivered to warehouses 2.06)4
No. 1 Feed Oats sacked, per
.
No._ 1 Timothy Hay....
White Beans, per pound
Produce.
$34.00
08)4
Eggs, per doz.
Butter, creamery, per lb.
Butter, ranch, per lb.
Potatoes, per cwt.
Young chickens, per lb....
Hogs, live wt., light, per lb
Old roosters, per lb.
Hogs, dressed, heavy, per lb.. ,[email protected]
Hogs, dressed, light, per lb.,[email protected]
1 .6 at 8c
Veal flr<i Sse Q ! p er [email protected]
Spring lambs, per lb
Mutton, per lb.
60c
65c
60c
80c
15c
16c
08c
Veal, live wt., per lb
9c
[email protected]
QUOTATIONS
SpiAai
We ore paying following prices f.o.b.
ic fur week ending Nov. 23,
1918.
Butter Fat .
Hens, 4 lbs. and over, alive
Hens, smaller .
Old Roosters .
Spring*, 2)4 and over .
Ducks .
Geese .
Veal, No. 1, dressed.
Hides .
COMMERCIAL CREAMERY CO.
Spokane. Wash.
63c
22c
19c
13c
22e
18c
16c
13c
Market
Ringworm
Scalp Sores
yea want ipeedy help try the O. O. D._
•criptioo. So easy to apply, not area «y or
mewy. It waafaea into the scalp and the relief
u mitant. Try it today on our guarantee.
Pm
The Liouid Wash
CORNER DRUG STORE
Death of J. P. Smith.
Jordan Paris Smith, better known as
''Doc." was born in Cameron county, Pa.,
(June 19. 1854.
He came to Lewiston, Idaho, in com
pany with his brother, Mix, in 1878. He
worked in that vicinity and on the Clear
water helping raft out logs until 1883,
when he with three other men—Bill
Benner, AI Elliot and Bill Ellis—filed
on the first preemptions that were taken
up in -what is now known as Cedar Creek
ridge. Three years later he fielded to the
preemption land a homestead on which
he made his home until his death.
PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS
DR. W. A. ADAIR-—Physician, Creigh
ton Blk. Phone 85;
DR. J. N. CLARKE—Physician. New
Creighton Blk. Phone 139.
DR. C. L. GRITMAN—Physician and
surgeon, 720 So. Main. Phone 27.
DR. JOHN W. STEVENSON—Physi
cian, eye, ear, throat and nose spe
cialist, 303 E, 3rd. Phone 177,
DR. D. F. RAE^— Physician, Brown Blk.
Phone 33J.,, .
DR. F. M. LE ITCH—Physician, Com
mercial Bldg. Phone 223Y;
DR. J. J. HERRINGTON — Office
over Willis' Drug Store, Phone 346;
Phone 187R.
OSTEOPATH
DR. W. M. HATFIELD—Osteopath,
Creighton Bldg. Phone 48. '
CHIROPRACTIC
DR. ZONA BIGGS—Chiropractic. Steele
Bldg. Phone 331H.
DENTISTS
DR. I. R. BOYD—-Dentist, Creighton
Bldg, Phone 168R.
DR. H. J. SMITH—Dentist, Urquhart
Bldg. Phone 9.
DR. J. A. Mi DANIELS—Dentist, First
Nat'l Bank Bldg. Phone 229.
DR. T. B. McBRYDE—Dentist, Brown
Blk. Phone 33L.
DR. L. A. PHILIPS—Dentists, Skatta
boe Bldg. Phone 14L.
LAWYERS
G. G. PICKETT—Lawyer, cor. First
and Main. Phone 2,
A. L. MORGAN—Lawyer, Urquhart
Bldg. Phone 75.
FRANK L. MOORE—Attorney-at-law,
Commercial Blk. Phone 81.
A. H. OVERSMITH
Law, Urquhart Bldg.
— Atttorney-at
Phone 208.
ORLAND & LEE — Attorneys-at-Law,
First Natl. Bank Bldg. Phones Or
land 104. Lee 104L.
H. R. SMITH—Attorney-at-Law, First
Natl. Bank Bldg., Third St. Entrance.
Phone 43Y,
JOHN NTS BET-—Attorney-at-Law, 1st
Natl. Bank Bldg. Phohe 13IJ.
J. H. FORNEY— Attorney-at-Law,
Commercial Blk. Phone 78,
ROY O. JOHNSON—Attorney-at-Law,
Commercial Blk. Phone 81.
SUPPINGER & OGDEN
at-Law,, New Creighton- Blk. Phone,
G. W. Suppinger 83 ; Scott, Ogden
. 83H.
Attorneys
FLORISTS
SCOTT
Main.
BROS — Proprietors, North
Phone 289.
VETERINARY
DR. J. D. ADAMS —Veterinary, 220
South. Asbury. Phone 15Y.
AUCTIONEER
CHAS. E. WALKS—Auctioneer, Urqu
hart RIgd, Phono 278,
^
=
FOR FIRST CLASS SHOE
'
REPAIRING
go to
J. N. FRIEDMAN
HARNESS SHOP
FINEST LINE OF HIGH GRADE
WOOLENS. YOUR INSPECTION
SOLICITED
O. H. SCHWARZ, Tailor.
LATAH COUNTY
TITLE & TRUST COMPANY
Abstracts of Title
Mortgage Loans
Conveyancing
Thompson Insurance Agency
Fire Insurance, Automobile and
Plate Glass Insurance, Fidelity and
Casualty Bonds
J. G. Vennigerholz, Prop.
Moscow. Idaho.
Cnpp, -tender
drains of sweet
BöHey flavor
GrapeNuts
FuV of Nourishment
married to
December 21, 189Ü, he was
-Miss Nellie Israel, a niece of Mrs. J. P.
Alexander, of Linden, who died July 10.
1912. To this union were born six chili
dren. three girls—Eva, Leah and Anna,
and three boys—Ben, Jimmie and George.
He was a faithful member of the I. O.
O. F. lodge in Kendrick.
Read today's news in today's Star
Mirror.
YOUR
MONEY
Draws interest when
deposited in this bank.
It earns nothing when
carried around in your
posket.
FIRST TRUST
& SAVINGS BANK
Inland Market
10,000 chickens
wanted. Highest
market price paid.
Monuments
THE MOSCOW MARBI.Ë
WORKS
George H. Moody, Proprietor
Has the finest line of Monuments
and all Kinds of Marble Work to
be found in the Inland Empire
PRICES REASONABLE
See Our Work Before Ordering
Victrolas and
Victor Records
Sherfey's Book Store
Moscow, Idaho
If It's New We Are Sure the
First to Have It
J
Jim
1
V
Hotel Moscow
Jm
V
t
TOM WRIGHT, Prop.
v
*
*
*
Thoroughly Modern
*
*r
-
*
FIRST CLASS GRILL
AUTO BUS AT ALL TRAINS 4
*
\
4
You will find you save more
and live better if you trade at
the
THIRD STREET
MARKET
CHICKENS, GEESE, DUCKS
AND HIDES WANTED j
L. M. KITLEY
PHONE 248'
CLASSIFIED ADS
HELP WANTED—Female
WANTED — COMPETENT GIRL
for' general housework. Mrs. Geo.
Phone 62J; corner 1st and
35-tf.
Weber.
Van Buren.
LOSV AND FOUND
LOST—A PAIR OF GLASSES IN
Phone 264 or leave at Star
46-tf
case.
Mirror; reward.
FOR RENT—Rooms
FOR RENT—FURNISHED ROOMS
or will room and board. Private
family. Phone 266W.
44-48
FOR RENT —A ROOM WITH OR
without sleeping porch; hot and cold
ater ; modern conveniences; price rea
nabe. 425 East Third St. Mrs. D.
quhart.
13tf
FOR RENT
suite; also sleeping room.
105W. 317 South Jefferson
1 HOUSEKEEPING
Cafl
44-49
FOR RENT—FURNISHED APART
raents and furnished rooms at
Eggan's apartments. Phone 206H.
23'1-tf
FOR RENT—ONE LARGE 3-ROOM
apartment« $15; one 3-room apart
ment, slightly smaller, $12; one
2-room apartment, $10; one 2-room
apartment, $9; two furnished rooms»
$7. 310 South Lilly. Phone 338.
29-tf
FOR TRADE
FOR TRADE — IMPROVED 10
acres close to Moscow for larger place.
Write Box 98, Rt. 2 or call 9408. 44-50
FOR TRADE—320 ACRES MON
tana land for city dwelling. Price
$6400. C. G. Smith, Route 5, Mos
44-49
cow, phone 9196
WANTED—TO EXCHANGE ONE
two bottom 14-inch gang plow for
three bdttom. Phone 9251. J. H. Dyai
289-M
FOR RENT— Homes
FOR RENT — A NEW, MODERN
Bungalow ; paved streets ; close in,
three minutes' walk from Main St.; $20
per month ; automobile garage, coal and
wood bins. Phone 137Z.
44-50
FOR RENT—IJIVE ROOM HOUSE
Corner Main and Monroe. Phone
44-tf
1Y. J. E. Mudgett.
FOR RENT—A 7-ROOM MODERN
house, close in. C. H. Patten. 43-55
FOR RENT—AN 8-ROOM MODERN
house near the domitory. Phone 170J.
Mrs. John Shannon.
3t£
FOR RENT—2-ACRE TRACT WITH
5-room house, cheap. Phone 290R.
32»
FOR SALE—Livestock
FOR SALE—ONE LARGE SORREL
horse, 6 years old, weight 1300 lbs.;
E. A. Hendrickson, phone 9268. 40-46
FOR SALE—Poultry
FOR SALE-FINE BOURBON RED
turkeys, sired by first prize winner
at world's fair. Mrs. E. R. Headley,
Phone 9153. 41-tf
W ANTED—Miscellaneous
WANTED—20 CARS OF U. S.
Grade No. 1 White and Russet
potatoes. Phone or write Garfield
Fruit & Produce Co., Garfield, Wash.
_ _ 40-tf
WANTED—GOOD LIVE DEALER
to sell the best truck on the market
Can make deliveries I to 5 tons. Write
Rochester Motor Co., 1012 Sprague
Ave.. Spokane, Wash.
235-tf
WANTED TO RENT—AN OFFICE
desk. Telephone 362.
291-tf
WANTED—100 TONS GOOD PEA
straw.
Fruit & Produce Co., Garfield, Wash.
40-tf
Call
or write Garfield
WANTED TO BUY A FIRST CLASS
' cow. Phone 917X3.
40-4«
FOR SALE—Real Estate
FOR TRADE—IMPROVED TWO
acres for small car. Phone 290R. Sltf 1
FOR SALE—A 5-ROOM MODERN
residence; good cellar and garage.
Phone 263H. Fred Stone.
16-tf
FOR SALE—6-ROOM MODERN
residence; choice location, corner lot,
garage, etc. Phone 267Y. Sam
*> ■ Vs's-tf.
'I.
'ey.
FOR SALE —HOUSE AND LOT,
corner First and Polk Sts. Inquiro k
Mrs. Wm. Arnett. 244tf
FOR SALE — 80 ACRES THREE
miles east of Moscow ; house and barn..
Write E. R. Fuller, Lewiston, Idaho, or
see N. G. Gilbertson, adjoining farm. 6tf
FOR SALE—Miscellaneous
FOR SALE—DOMO CREAM SEP
arator, bought three years ago; has
not been used that long. Make
handled by Empire Hardware Co.
Price $30.00. Phone 9014.
46-65
MILK FOR SALE—10 QUARTS FOR
46-52'
$1 : delivered.
Phone 105R.
FOR SALE—A HAND POWER VAC
eleaner and good Edison
phonograph and records. Phone 24R.
42-48
uum
FOR SALE—24 HEAD SHROPSHIRE
sheep. Write A. E. Alexander. Phone
Farmer 942K5.
32tf
jpLINE - KNIGHT 7-PASSENGER
touring car, in good condition, for sale
r trade, Moscow Auto & Supply Co.
• 283tt
SELDEN TRUCKS SOLD ON DE
ferred payment plan. Write Rochester
Motor Co.. 1012 Sprague Ave., Spo
kane, Wash.
235-tf
FOR SALE—1 LEATHER LOUNGE,.
1 bookcase, 1 oak chiltonier, 1 oak
table, 2 mattresses. 2 oak rockers, 1
bird's eye maple bedstead, 3 crocks, 1
woven vvrie spring. ' 720 Idaho street.
Phone 274L.
42tf
MISCELLANEOUS
WANTED—A BUGGY WITH TOP.
Phone 9311.
43-49
THOSE WISHING ODD JOBS DONE
phone Ray Stevens, c-o Plummer's
Cafe« 26-tf '

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