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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, November 22, 1918, Image 2

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The DAILY STAR-MIRROR
Published every evening except Sun
day, at Moscow, Idaho.
GEO. N. LAMPHERE, Publisher.
The Official Newspaper of the City of
Moscow.
Entered as second-class matter Oct.
16, 1911, at the poktoffice of Moscow,
Idaho, under the Act of Congress of
March, 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Deliverd by carrier to any part of city
Per Month ..
„ Three Months
Six Months .
One Year ...
4.00
50c
$1.50
2.75
6.00
By Mail
(outside of city and on rural routes):
Per Month . .
Three Months
Six Months
One Year ...
40c
$1.16
2.25
The (Weekly) Idaho Post:
$1.50
Per Year
MEMBER OF ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively
entitled to the use for republication
of all news-dispatches credited to it
or not otherwise credited in this paper
and also the local news published
therein.
All rights of republication of
special dispatches herein are also re
served.
THE COLONEL'S HARD LUCK.
Colonel Roosevelt is certainly playing)
in hard luck. After spending six years
in pointing out to the public the weak
nesses of Woodrow Wilson, the Colonel
is forced to witness that much despised
usurper going to Europe to be acclaimed
the saver of democracy and treated with
acclaim by the greatest men of the
European nations, including crowned
and uncrowned heads.
The Colonel had planned, but. true to
•the Roosevcltian instinct, had given his
plans to the newspapers as soon as
formed, a trip to France to visit the
grave of his son. No sooner had the
announcement been made than President
Wilson announces his intention of ac
cepting the invitation of the rulers of
our allied countries to go to Paris and
visit the capitals of all of our Allies. It
docs not require an expert to see that
there will be little "acclaim" left for the
Colonel when he gets over to France
after _peace i? finally arranged and Wil
son lias spent weeks tlieréi
Btu that is not all. The Colonel has
been grooming himself for the race for
the presidential nomination on th'e re
publican ticket in 1920 so long and so
faithfully that it seemed there could be
no "slip up" this time and he would
surely be nominated, if not by acclama
r
The Strength of Years
If it means anything to you, as a prospective de
positor, that the First National Bank has been identi
fied with Moscow progress for one-third of a cen
tury—
That it has kept pace with the growth of this
community during thirty-six eventful years, and
conscientiously lived up to its policies of safety and
conservatism during that period—
Then this will be an important consideration in
choosing the banking connection that is to serve
your interests during the years to come.
The First National Bank
Oh MOSCOW
I
I
Ü
Established in the year 1882
1. S. Hsckathorn, Cashier
W. L. Payne, President
Ü
NX
STOP!
LOOK ! LISTEN !
Order Your Thanksgiving Poultry Now
We will have a fine selection of Turkeys, Ducks, Geese, Hens
and Roasting Chickens.
Veal, per pound .
Link Sausage, per pound
Spare Ribs, per pound...
Fancy New York Count Oysters, per quart.. 1.00
$ .16
.28
.20
Cold Storage Market
PHONE 7
at least by an overwhelming ma
»«•;•
jonty.
Hut "the best laid plans of men and
mice gang aft aglee," said the poet, and
lit seems that a new and grave danger
from an unexpected source
the Colonel in the face,
less than the starting of a boom for
General Pershing for the republican
nomination for president in 1920. Oh;
Just to think all of the days
1 weeks and months of hard work in
now stares
It is nothing
horrors.
showing the faults of President Wilson
and his son-in-law, W. G. McAdoo, who
will probably he the democratic nominee
and just as the Colonel Ited decided that
nothing could defeat him for the repub
lican nomination to have a war hero, a
real war hero who fought—not the kind
who remained at home and talked and
! wrote—but a real fighter, the idol of
the Amcricn people, brought out with
almost a certainty that he can have the
nomination if he wants it, that is more
than "flesh and blood can bear,
wonder the Colonel is confined to a New
York hospital under the care of a phy
No
sician.
WHAT GERMANY MUST PAY.
France wants Germany to pay her
$67.000,000.000, which is about $1.000 for
every man. woman and child in Ger
many.
Belgium will probably have a
hill of $20.000,000.000 against Germany,
I England's bill will be no small item,
Serbia must he reimbursed for the dam
age done to her, and Italy will also ask
heavy damages from the Huns. Ger
many's war debt at home is estimated at
45 per cent of the wealth of the German
empire before the war and thstt wealth
has undoubtedly shrunk perceptibly.
The United States will claim damages
from Germany and will get at least a
part of its claim. The kaiser and his
war lords announced at the beginning
and several times during the war that
"the conquered nations will pay for this
war and generations yet unborn will
stagger under the weight of that debt."
For once the kaiser spoke truly.
Germany has lost in killed more than
one and three-quarter millions of men.
She has had four millions wounded.
She has lost her navy and all her col
onies and will lose additional territory.
She has lost the respect and confidence
6f the people of every nation of the
world. She can never again build up a
trade with any of these countries for
"made in Germany" which, in former
years sold goods everywhere, will pre
vent their sale for generations.
Germany is today in worse condition
than Belgium, Serbia or any of the coun
tries that were engaged in the war and
-he will remain in that condition for
many years. She "sowed the
many,
wind'' and now she is to "reap the whirl
wind."
im te
The investigation at Pullman is un
Pullman and Washington
State college had a hard scourge of the
influenza and there were many deaths
(more than SO), and it is not surprising
that relatives of those who died should
feel resentful. But it seems the wrong
tactics were used by the college author
ities and the people of Pullman. They
did not cö-operate with the bereaved
relatives in trying to get at the facts,
hut began at once to try to discredit the
man who made the charges and to try
to disprove his statements. How much
better it would have been for Pullman
had Professor Sanborn, who makes such
serious charges against the institution
and the management of the influenza
quarantine and the care of the sick, been
given the assistance, the kind treatment
and the courtesy that was given Mr.
Fraser, of Jerome, Idaho, whose son
died after leaving the University or
Idaho, and who felt probably as badly
and as deeply resentful as Professor
Sanborn until he learned the true con
ditions. Today Mr. Fraser is a warm
friend and supporter instead of an
enemy of the school.
fortunate.
While the surrender of the German
fleet, from a military standpoint is a
great victory, from a financial standpoint
it is really a loss to the Allies. What
will we do with 200 or 300 submarines?
It is to be fervently hoped that there
will never be a time when they can be
used. Surely not within the life of the
present generation or the life of the
submarines which are now being sur
rendered, will these instruments of mur
der ever be needed. It is to be hoped
that no one now living will ever again
see a battle ship, a battle cruiser, a tor
pedo boat destroj'er or a submarine en
gaged in actual warfare and fighting
ships, like guns and cannons, are good
for only one thing—to destroy. The up
keep of these ships will add much to the
cost of the governments which get them,
but we are all glad to take them from
the Germans who are probably the only
persons in the world who would ever
want to use them again.
Even the "busy little bee" which we
were taught in our childhood "improved
each shining hour and gathered honey
all the day from every opening flower"
lias joined the steel trust and the air
plane manufacturer in profiteering be
cause of the war, While no one will
claim that it costs more to feed bees
now than before the war, the price
honey has jumped from 10 cents to
almost SO cents a pound. With a quart
of strained honey selling for $1.25 to
$1.35 as compared with the price of
honey a few years ago, when it sold at
from 75 cents to $1 per gallon, one can
not help feeling that the "huzzy little
bee" or his owner has imbibed some of
the "get-rich-while-the-war-lasts" germs
which are pervading mankind generally.
Word has just been received from
Mrs. J. A. Dodd that Captain Dodd set
sail for France a week ago from Camp
Upton with the hospital unit No. 100.
Dr. W. W. Wasser of Portland arrived
in Moscow today to meet with a num
ber of Methodist ministers to discuss a
campaign to enlarge the work of the
missionary societies.
» I
Card of Thanks.
We wish to thank our many friends
for their sympathy and kindness dur
ing our recent bereavement. Especi
ally the firemen for their kind assist
ance and flowers. Also the Univer
sity faculty, I. O. O. F., Mr. Green
and employees and all others for their
beautiful floral offerings.
Mrs. V. A. Almquist.
John Almquist and Family.
P
MARKETS
♦ ♦♦ + ♦ + ♦ + + *♦♦♦+•»

*
The following market quotations
are the prices paid to the producer
by the dealer and are changed daily,
thus giving the public the accurate
quotations in all classes of grain,
produce and meats.
Hay and Grain
Wheat, Bluestem No. 1, bulk,
net, delivered to warehouses $2.02%
Wheat, Bluestem, No. 1, sacked
net, delivered to warehouses 2.11%
Wheat, Fortyfold, No. 1, bulk,
net, delivered to warehouses 2.02%
Wheat, Fortyfold, No. 1, sTced,
net, delivered to warehouses 2.11%
Wheat, White Club, No. 1 bulk,
net, delivered to warehouses 2.00%
Wheat, White Club, No. 1, s'ked
net, delivered to warehouses 2.09%
Wheat, Red Russian, No. 1 bulk
net, delivered to warehouses 1.97%
Wheat, Red Russian, No. 1 sTc'd
net, delivered to warehouses 2.06%
No. 1 Feed Oats sacked, per
hundred ..
No. 1 Timothy Hay....
White Beans, per pound
Produce.
Eggs, per doz.
Butter, creamery, pe
Butter, ranch, per lb,
Potatoes, per cwt.
Young cakkens, per lb....
Hogs, live wt., light, per lb
Old roosters, per lb.
Hogs, dressed, heavy, per lb. -. [email protected]
Hogs, dressed, light, per lb.. . [email protected]
Veal, live wt, per lb..
Veal, d r es s e d , per lb
3.15
$34.00
.08%
.60c
r lb
65c
60c
80c
15c
16c
08c
.6 at 8c
[email protected]
Spring lambs, per lb .9c
Mutton, per lb.. [email protected]
IDAHO COUNTY HAS MANY
CASES IN U. S. COURT
The U. S. district court will be con
vened in Moscow on Saturday, No
vember 30, at 10 a. m., instead of
November 25, as had previously been
planned, it is announced by the clerk
of the federal court. The grand jury
will meet on that day and the trial
jury on Monday, December 2.
Among cases from Idaho county to
come up at the next session of the
federal court are:
Loren Hodson, charge of seditious
utterances, held in the county jail in
Orangeville because of inability to
produce bond required.
Henry Bock, charged with seditious
utterances, out of jail on $1000 cash
bond.
R. W. Bignell, non-partisan organi
zer, charged with seditious utterances
out of jail on bond.—Idaho County
Free Press.
Notice.
Creekmur's Business college will re
open on Monday the 2Sth. All having
typewriters will please return them by
Monday morning
48-49
T. N. CREEKMUR.
PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS
DR. W. A. ADAIR—Physician, Creigh
ton Blk 1 ^Phone8ik^
DR. J. N. CLARKE—Physician, New
Creighton Blk, Phone 139.
DR. C. L. GRITMAN—Physician and
surgeon, 720 So. Main. Phone 27.
DR. JOHN W. STEVENSON—Eye
Ear, Nose and Throat.
Fitted. Office of Dr. Aspray, 303
3rd Ave. Phone 177.
Glasses
DR. D. F. RAE—Physician, Brown Blk.
Phone 33J.
DR. F. M. LEITCH—Physician, Com
mercial Bldg. Phone 223Y.
DR. J. J. HERRINGTON
Office
over Willis' Drug Store. Phone 346;
Phone 187R.
OSTEOPATH
DR. W. M. HATFIELD—Osteopath,
Creighton Bldg. Phone 48.
CHIROPRACTIC
DR. ZONA BIGGS—Chiropractic, Steele
Bldg. Phone 331H.
DENTISTS
DR. I. R. BOYD—Dentist, Creighton
Bldg, Phone 168R.
DR. H. J. SMITH—Dentist, Urquhart
Bldg. Phone 9.
DR. J. A. .McDANIELS—Dentist, First
Nat'l Bank Bldg. Phone 229,
DR. T. B. McBRYDE—Dentist, Brown
Blk. Phone 33L.
DR. L. A. PHILIPS—Dentists; Skatta
boe Bldg. Phone 14L.
LAWYERS
PICKETT—Lawyer,
and Main. Phone 2,
cor.
A. L. MORGAN—Lawyer, Urquhart
Bldg. Phone 75.
FRANK L. MOORE—Attorney-at-law,
Commercial Blk, Phone 81.
A. H. OVERSMITH —Atttorney-at
Law, Urquhart Bldg. Phone 208.
ORLAND & LEE—- Attorneys-at-Law,
First Natl. Bank Bldg. Phones Or
land 104. Lee 104L.
H. R. SMITH—Attorney-at-Law, First
Natl. Bank Bldg,, Third St. Entrance.
Phone 43Y.
JOHN NISBET—Attorney-at-Law, 1st
Natl. Bank Bldg. Phone 131J.
J. H. FORNEY
Commercial Blk. Phone 78.
Attorney - at - Law,
ROY O. JOHNSON—Attorney-at-Law,
Commercial Blk, Phone 81.
SUPPINGER & OGDEN — Attorneys
at-Law, New Creighton Blk. Phone,
G. W. Suppinger 83 ; Scott, Ogden
83 H.
FLORISTS
SCOTT
BROS — Proprietors, North
Main. Phone 289.
VETERINARY
DR. E. T. BAKER—Assistant State
Veterinarian. Residence Sixth and
Washington, phone 243.
DR. J. D. ADAMS — Veterinary, 220
South Asbury. Phone 1SY.
AUCTIONEER
CHAS. E. WALKS—Auctioneer, Urqu
hart Blgd. Phone 278.
FOR FIRST CLASS SHOE
REPAIRING
go to
J. N. FRIEDMAN
HARNESS SHOP
FINEST LINE OF HIGH GRADE
WOOLENS. YOUR INSPECTION
SOLICITED
O. H. SCHWARZ, Tailor.
LATAH COUNTY
TITLE & TRUST COMPANY
Abstracts of Title
Mortgage Loans
Conveyancing
Thompson Insurance Agency
Fire Insurance, Automobile and
Plate Glaas Insurance, Fidelity and
Casualty Bonds
J. G. Vennigerholz, Prop.
Moscow, Idaho.
Former Employes Secure Jobs.
Roy Poe, who was to have been in
the next call for registered men,
which was cancelled because of the
signing of the armistice, went to Pot-
latch Tuesday to take a position with
the W., I. A M. Railway company as
weighmaster. He had formerly been
in the employ of the company, but
had resigned his position in expecta-
tion of entering the army. It is un-
derstood to be the policy of the W.,
I. & M. Railway company and of
the Potlatch Lumber company to take
care of their former employes in so
far as possible after they are dis-
charged from service.—Palouse Re-
public.
-M
Read The Daily Star-Mirror "Want
Ads."
YOUR
MONEY
Draws interest when
deposited in this bank.
It earns nothing when
carried around in your
pocket.
FIRST TRUST
& SAVINGS BANK
Inland Market
10,000 chickens
wanted. Highest
market price paid.
Monuments
THE MOSCOW MARBLF.
WORKS
George H. Moody, Proprietor
Has the finest line of Monuments
and all Kinds of Marble Work to
be found in the Inland Empire
PRICES REASONABLE
See Our Work Before Ordering
Victrolas and
Victor Records
Sherfey's Book Store
Moscow, Idaho
If It's New We Are Sure the
First to Have It
*
4
Hotel Moscow t
4*
1
TOM WRIGHT, Prop.
. 5 .
t
Thoroughly Modern
Î
FIRST CLASS GRILL
AUTO BUS AT ALL TRAINS
You will find you save more
and live better if you trade at
the
THIRD STREET
MARKET
CHICKENS, GEESE, DUCKS
AND HIDES WANTED
L. M. KITLEY
PHONE 248
CLASSIFIED ADS
FOR RENT—Rooms
FOR RENT—FURNISHED ROOMS
or will room and board. Private
family. Phone 266W.
44-48
FOR RENT—TWO LIGHT HOUSE
keeping rooms, partly furnished.
children. 501 East Sixth St.
48-60
FOR RENT—LIGHT HOUSEKEEP
ing rooms. 310 So. Lilly. Phone 338.
_47tf .
FOR RENT —A ROOM WITH OR
without sleeping porch ; hot and cold
atcr; modern conveniences: price rea
. nahe,
quhart.
42S East Third St. Mrs. D. •
13tf
FOR RENT —1 HOUSEKEEPING
suite; also sleeping room.
105W. 317 South Jefferson
(Tail
44-4»
FOR RENT—FURNISHED APART
raents and furnished rooms at
Eggan's apartments. Phone 205H.
231-tf •
FOR TRADE
FOR TRADE— IMPROVED It
acres dose to Moscow for larger placé.
Write Box 98, Rt. 2 or call 9408. 44-59,
FOR TRADE—320 ACRES MON
tana land for city dwelling. Prie® J
$6400. C. G. Smith, Route 5, Mos-'
44-4»
cow, phone 9196
WANTED—TO EXCHANGE ONE
two bottom 14-inch gang plow for
three bdttom. Phone 9251. J. H. Dye.
289-tf
FOR RENT—Houses
FOR RENT — A NEW, MODERN^
Bungalow ; paved streets ; close in,*
three minutes' walk from Main St. ; $20
per month ; automobile garage, coal and
wood bins.
44-50
Phone 137Z.
FOR RENT—FIVE ROOM HOUSE
Corner Main and Monroe. Phone
1Y. J. E. Mudgett.
44-tf
FOR RENT—A 7-ROOM MODERN
house, close in. C. H. Patten. 43-65
FOR RENT—AN 8-ROOM MODERN
house near the domitory. Phone 170J.
Mrs. John Shannon.
3«f
FOR RENT—2-ACRE TRACT WITH
S-room house, cheap. Phone 290R.
32ti
FOR SALE—Poultry
FOR SALE—FINE BOURBON RED
turkeys, sired by first prize winner
at world's fair. Mrs. E. R. Headley,
Phone 9153.
41-tf
WANTED—Miscellaneous
WANTED—20 CARS OP U. S.
Grade No. 1 White and Russet
potatoes. Phone or write Garfield
Fruit & Produce Co., Garfield, Wash.
40-tf
WANTED—GOOD LIVE DEALER '
to sell the best truck on the market
Can make deliveries 1 to 5 tons. Write
Rochester Motor Co., 1012 Sprague
Ave., Spokane, Wash.
235-tf '
WANTED TO RENT—AN OFFICE .
desk. Telephone 352.291-tf
WANTED—100 TONS GOOD PEA
Call or write Garfield
Fruit & Produce Co., Garfield, Wash.
40-tf
straw.
FOR SALE—Real Estate
FOR TRADE—IMPROVED TWO
acres for small car. Phone 290R. 31tf
FOR SALE—A 5-ROOM MODERN
residence; good cellar and garage.
16-tf
Phone 263H. Fred Stone.
FOR SALE—8-ROOM MODERN
residence ; choice location, corner lot.
Phone 267Y. Sam Silvey.
2SS-tf.
garage, etc.
FOR SALE —HOUSE AND LOT.
corner First and Polk Sts. Inquire
244tf
Mrs. Wm. Arnett.
FOR SALE — 80 ACRES THREE
miles east of Moscow ; house and bam.
Write E. R. Fuller, Lewiston, Idaho, or
ee N. C. Gilbertson, adjoining farm. 6tf ,
FOR SALE—Livestock
FOR SALE—COW AND 2 CALVES ;
3 young heifer calves. Phone 5.
48-50 *
FOR SALE—Miscellaneous
FOR SALE—ONE BUREAU, ONE
bird's-eye maple bedstead, one brass
bedstead, one oak table, two rockers, one
bed spring. E. H. Storer, 1107 Deakin
Ave. Phone 41L.
47tf
FOR SALE—DOMO CREAM SEP
arator, bought three years ago; has
not been used that long,
handled by Empire Hardware Co.
Price $30.00. Phone 9014.
Make
46-55
MILK FOR SALE—10 QUARTS FOR
46-52
$1 : delivered.
Phone 10SR.
FOR SALE—A HAND POWER VAC
uum cleaner and good Edison
phonograph and records. Phone 24R.
42-48
FOR SALE—24 HEAD SHROPSHIRE
sheep. Write A. E. Alexander. Phone
Farmer 942K5.
32tf
jpLTNE - KNIGHT 7-PASSENGER
touring car, in good condition, for sale
trade. Moscow Auto & Supply Co.
283tf
SELDEN TRUCKS SOLD ON DE
ferred payment plan. Write Rochester
Motor Co., 1012 Sprague Ave., Spo
kane, Wash.
235-tf
MISCELLANEOUS
CASH PAID FOR LIBERTY BONDS.
Metropolitan Investment Co. C. H.
Patten. Mgr.
WE ARE IN THE MARKET FOR A \
limited amount of Blue Prussian peas.
47-49 .
48tf
Washburn & Wilson.
WANTED—A BUGGY WITH TOP.
43-49
Phone 9311.
THOSE WISHING ODD JOBS BONE
phone Ray Stevens, c-o Plummer's
Cafe.
25-tf
A

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