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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, November 22, 1918, Image 3

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1918-11-22/ed-1/seq-3/

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WILLIAMSON'S ARE BUSY!
AND NO WONDER
For a total disregard for cost or value the great Store assumes and is doing. Williamson will not linger; he will not haggle over lucre. Close this insti
tution at the earliest possible moment—cost what it may. He can sell in bulk to be shipped out of town any minute. He has given you a final warning
that December 15th is the last day for you to fill your present and future wants—in other words, his letter to you of November 12th promised you he
would not sell these stocks in bulk before December 15th. We appreciate where you who have winter needs would be placed should this Store with
these still great stocks of merchandise close its doors on you in a minute's warning. We may not on December 15th close to you; but, understand and
mark our words, that*on that day Williamson's conscience will be clear to do what he thinks best. This Store in its entirety has issued new price lists
throughout, and still further general reductions on everything. You are offered a chance, but bear in mind Williamson never did beg you to buy of
him. You can save a lot of money if you take his advise.
All Women's Fall
and Winter Suits at
SATURDAY SPECIALS
Half Price
One Lot of 20 Coats to be closed out entirely Saturday.
Values $12.50, $15.00 and $16.50, all at the one price..
STAMPED GOODS
to be embroidered. Appropriate for Christmas gifts, in Scarfs,
Center Pieces, Novelties, Pillow Tops, Card Table Covers, etc.,
All Reduced for Quick Selling Saturday.
DRESS GOODS SPECIAL
3.98
25 Pieces of Dress Goods in Serge, Tweed, Gabardine, Batiste,
Chevron Suiting, Granite Cloth, Danish Poplar Cloth and Wool
Voile, in popular shades. Values to $1.25 a yard—Special.... 50c
COLUMBIA MERCERIZED CROCHET COTTON in colors, Reg.
15 cents—Saturday Special, each
9c
ALL WOMEN'S AND CHILDREN'S FALL
HATS ONE-HALF PRICE.
ALL EVENING GOWNS HALF PRICE.
ROYAL SOCIETY EMBROIDERY PACKAGES—All go Saturday
1-3 off
OUTING FLANNEL
at
25 Pieces of Outing Flannel in Light and Dark Colors and vari
ous patterns. Full width; regular 40c value—Special, yard....25c
EIDERDOWN YARN
LADIES' SMOCKS LESS THAN HALF PRICE
Your choice of any Woman's Middy in the house,
values to $2.50, at .. -..
Liberal assortment of colors, regular 30c—Saturday Special,
per skein
98c
10c
SUMMER DRESS GOODS
Voiles, Lace Cloth, Organdies, Crepes and many other summer
materials in stripes, floral patterns, checked, and plain colors in
many shades. Values to $1.00 yd.—Special, yard
ALL WOMENS' SILK SWEATERS
WOMENS' HOUSE DRESSES
in all sizes; good assortment of patterns. Materials alone
would cost $2.00 without the making—Out they go at..
ONE LOT OF COATS
placed on a rack for quick selling Saturday. Materials of Velvet,
Zibiline, Wool Kersey and Wool Mixture. Values to
$22.50-—-All one price Saturday at.
98c
18-inch,
$6.75 to $22.60—Saturday at
all good assortment of colors. Regular values
Just /i Price
25c
3J
CAP AND SCARF SETS
SILK PONGEE AND POPLINS
25 Pieces of Silk Pongee, Rajah and Poplins in plain colors,
stripes and figured. Values to $2.25—Special, yard.
All Wool Angora Cap with Scarf to Match in all the wanted
Regular $3.25, $3.50 and $3.98—All go Saturday at
...$1.98
7.95
colors.
per set
75c
Ml
WILLIAMSON'S
THE STORE THAT IS STEPPING
OUT BUT NOT DOWN
a
THE STORE THAT IS STEPPING
OUT BUT NOT DOWN
P
& i
y
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Weather—Idaho—Tonight and Satur
day, fair.
We are in the market for a limited
amount of Blue Prussian peas,
burn & Wilson.
Scott Ogden left last evening for Spo
kane.
Rev. F. S.' Spalding, Methodist min
ister of Oakesdale, visited yesterday
with Rev. Perry and Rev. MacCaughey.
Christmas, Brackert's—shop early.
48-53
Take your storage battery to Al
bright's Garage for good care and at
tention thru the winter. 48-52
Mrs. E. A. Paterka and two daughters
left last evening for their home in Re
public, Wash.
Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Swartz of Spokane
and Mr. and Mrs. Fred Swartz of Tekoa.
who have been in Moscow for several
days, left yesterday for cAcir homes.
Miss Anna Nelson of Kendrick was in
the city shopping yesterday.
Miss Clara Smith lias returned to her
school near Farmington after spending
her vacation in Moscow.
Mr. and 'Mrs. Ed. Erickson of Gene
see were in Moscow yesterday on busi
ness.
Wash
47-49
Dolls, Dolls, Dolls, at Brackert's.
48-53
Miss Nellie Tomer is ill with' 1 influ
enza at her home in southeast Moscow.
Jonas Grove from near Genesee was
in town yesterday.
G. W. Walters left today for Creston,
Wash., called by the illness of his
daughter.
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Tegland of
Genesee were in the city shopping yes
,. prdav .
.-a t- p . ..
Born —To Mr and Mis Pete Me
Downald, a son, last evening at the Pleas
ant Home. f Mr. McDownald is ill with
influenza.
Visit Toyland at Brackert's. 48-53
Miss Josephine Brown had the misfor
tune to dislocate her ankle yesterday,
She will he disabled for two weeks or
more.
Bn-.ce Ellis,-auto salesman, left for
Spokane today.
Miss Pauline Ford, who bas been visit
ing her parents, left todav for her school
nr Sandnoint '
JL , r I,-
Mrs. Thomas of Colfax is visiting her
sister. Miss Isabel Dickinson.
John Frei arrived this morning from
Spokane, called hy the death of his
father, J. J. Frei.
Mrs. P. C. Wilson left yesterday for
Spokane to visit her daughter.
Mrs. L. M. Kitlcy and little daughter,
Betty Mae, came home this morning
from Texlinc. Texas, where Mrs. Kitley
has been visiting lier parents, Mr. and
Mrs. S. H. Trilt, former residents of
Moscow.
Mrs. Hupp of Oakesdale is visiting
Miss Littleton.
W. R. Russell came home at noon
from Colfax.
A. T. Hegstad, who returned last even
Joseph Van Buskirk has just received
the sad news of the death of his son-in
law, Bruce Moore, at Rochester, Minn.
No particulars were given as to his ill
ness.
ing from Astoria, where he has been
working in the shipyards for three
months, left today for Champion, Al
berta, to look for land.
The family of Conrad Peterson are
ill with influenza.
Born.—To Prof, and Mrs. J. H, John
son, a son, this morning at Gritman's
hospital.
JEWETT L. BARNES WAS
KILLED IN BATTLE
John F. Barnes, who recently mov
ed to Spokane from Moscow, has just
received word that his son, Jewett L.
Barnes, was killed in action on the
fighting front in France on Septem
ber 29. The young man left Moscow
in June, 1918, and was in the infantry
Mr. Barnes, senior, will be
remembered by people of Moscow,
where he lived for many years and
was in charge of the office work for
the Standard Lumber company. The
family have been doubly bereaved,
having recently lost a daughter hy
death, she having died shortly before
the family left Moscow, two months
ago.
service.
■ SR
WILL SCHOOL OPEN
MONDAY TO BE DECIDED
.
In ?* Je £, t0r ol Vls J ts Umv; er |My
Frank T. Shepherd, of Portland,
Oregon, inspector for the western
div j s j on 0 f vocational training work
for un i ve rsities and colleges, was in
]yj oscow yesterday and inspected the
work that is being done here. Mr,
Shepherd has charge of this work for
th e department of education of the
army. He says that the converting of
the Stewart building on North Main
street into barracks for the soldiers
set a new record in rapid work.
Shepherd had a picture sent out by
the war department sherwing work
ot this kind which was claimed to be
the world's record for quick work.
Accompanying the picture was the
record showing how many hours'
wor k ig requ i red to complete this
barracks. Mr. Shepherd said: "You
people of the university beat that
record by just 600 hours."
-~
Get Carload of Fordsons.
Sullivan & Reilly have just received a
car of seven Fordson tractors for farm
work. These attracted much attention
when unloaded at the station. They are
factored hy Henry Ford & Son,
carrying a kerosene burning four-cyl
inder engine producing 22 horse power,
They are designed to pull two 14-inch
plows in any kind of soil. Special de
attached to keep out dust and
This machine is arranged hy a
As The Star-Mirror goes to press the
local school board is in session consider
ing the question as to whether school
will open Monday or the quarantine be
continued. The city and county health
officers have .been called in for consul
The board lias not yet reached
tation.
a decision, but its decision will be pub
lished in Saturday's Star-Mirror.
Mr.
manu
vices are
dirt.
belt pulley to he used stationary.
BELIEVE LATAH
COUNTY HAS QUOTA
TROY FELL DOWN HARD BUT
OTHER DISTRICTS OVERSUB
SCRIBED THEIR SHARE
It is 'believed that Latah county's
quota of $22,000 for the united war
fund has been raised. All of the
figures are not in yet, but enough
precincts have reported to make it
quite certain that the full share for
this couhty has been subscribed. It
is said that Troy only gave about
$700 of her quota of $2,000 but sev
eral other points in the county gave
more than their quota.
Moscow was "over the top" last
night, but just how much is not
known. Moscow had a quota of about
$10,000, or nearly as much as all of
the remainder of the county. It is
believed that the total fixed for the
nation, $170,500,000, has been over
subscribed. It was hoped the sub
scriptions would reach $250,000,000
and this vast sum may be reached.
Genesee. Moscow and Potlatch are
known to have oversubscribed their
quotas. Troy is badly handicapped
by an epidemic of the "flu" and a
meeting of the business men is to be
held to take action to raise the
amount assessed against the town.
Every precinct that has not raised its
full quota is urged to continue work
until the amount is raised.
I
SAN FRANCISCO.—Typical of the
experiences of United States
aviators, whose field-to-field flights
in the central and eastern part of the
country are expected to make up an
interesting chapter in the history of
American aviation, is that of Captain
F. M. Bartlett who flew from Fort
Scott, Ill., to Kelly Field, Texas, 1700
New Books at the Library.
Here is a list of some new books
that are now placed in our public
library:
"Rebirth of Russia," by Marcos
son; "Best Russian Short Stories," by
Seltzer; "Pillars of Society," by Gar
diner; "Days Out," by Woodbridge;
"Christine," by Choemondley; "Non
sense Books," by Lear; "Camp-fire
Girls," (last edition) by Paper; "In
Sunny Spain," by Bates; "
Age," by Grahame; "Lisbeth Long
frock," by Aanrud.
Golden
Notice.
The Public Library will open Sunday
'at 2:00 p. m. 48-49
MOB MIKES
1300 MILE FLIGHT
THRILLING TRIP OF CAPT. BART
LETT FROM FORT SCOTT TO
KELLY FIELD
army
miles, through sunshine and storm.
This story of Captain Bartlett's
difficult flight is given by the United
States committee on public informa
tion:
"He covered the 341 miles between
Bellville and Clark field, Memphis,
•Tenessee, in 3 hours and 5 minutes at
an average speed of 110 miles an hour
favored by a stiff wind from the Great
Lakes and at an altitude of between
7000 and 9000 feet. On the second
leg of the trip between Memphis, Ten
nessee, and Payne Field, West Point,
Mississippi, wishing to stop for lunch,
he descended and was close to the
ground over an abandoned race track
when he suÏÏdenly found the air so
thin he knew he could not get off
this ground once he landed. He had
difficulty in getting back to the up
per currents again but by following
a flock of birds which flew in an as
cending circle, he secured enough alti
tude to continue. Approaching West
Point fine air was again encountered
but over this town he ran into an
electrical storm and was forced to
descend.
With clear weather the next day he
made 230 miles between West Point
and Lonoke, Arkansas, without a stop
though his gasoline gave out just as
he arrived over Eberts Field, near
this point, and Little Rock, Arkansas.
Here bad weather held him up four
days.
Four hundred and fifty miles of the
next ! 'g between Eberts Field and
Post F! 'Id, Fort Sill, Oklahoma, which
had not been covered before in an
airplane up to th's time, proved the
harde: task in Li - whole trip. He
made lie distance in nine ho rs of
difficr! flying over tin Ozark Moun
tains end came down at Hug i, Okla
homa, for gasoline.
He had made his cou sa s rright
from 1 ittle Rock over E ' Ovr
an ai- line, for Fort S : 1 but wi '
nothin but a rough ca ret of high
hills rr 1 thick tin-p er under him, a
far as he could see, and on acroun
of the t ad weather ncl- ing, ' - ■' '
oned *1 e air line to the w:s' an
veered to the south. Sixty miEs in
this d' "ction from Hugo he encount
ered r gale of sue'-' fore-» as to fell
trees ! ''ow him. II ' attempt'"!
it, but w s cm' -ht i n -,
ks it!
5
rise o
wedge of black clc ds, held in the
grip of - he storm a" ' f-r 35 minutes
hung o- er Arkadelp ia. .Arkansas II'»
plane schied from
feet to 3000 feet.
i alGtude of 6000
nd drifted about
two iri'l-'s side-wise when he final]"
broke ■'''rough the s'orm and came
out nr'Ms off his course but into dry
weather. By compass calculations he
picked up his direction again and .
landed r t Fort Sill without further |
incident.
Between
Falls, T"vas, he again met bad weath- !
Fort SiP and Wichita
Notice.
Sfo-es Closed Thanksgiving.
The business houses of Kendrick
have a''•reed to clo'w their stores all
day T 1 wsday, No-. c 8, and will ob
serve Thanksgiving day in a fitting
They have expressed the
sentiment that never before in the
history of the world have the people
had greater cause to be thankful than
on this Thanksgiving day.—Kendrick
Gazette.
manner.
er and had to be satisfied with a
short mileage. From the Falls Cap
tain Bartlett again failed to make
Fort Worth on the day following,
running into a stiff gale which held
his ground speed down to 25 miles
an hour and he landed in the dust at
Bridgeport, just short of his destina
tion.
The next day he made Fort Worth
without trouble but, leaving this post
at 6:30 a. m., he encountered a heavy
storm and was again forced to land at
Waco. Waiting for the storm to pass
PUBLIC SALE!
The undersigned will offer at Public Sale on the old P. L. Smith farm
Located one and one half miles west of the Thorn Creek church,
six miles north of Uniontown, and ten and a half
miles southwest of Moscow, on
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 27, '18
Commencing at 10 o'clock a. m., sharp, the following property, to-wit :
MACHINERY, ETC.
1 John Deere Mr.-it e Sy - rider.
1 Double Disk, t-.o.t ...„.itor
Drill.
1 12-foot McCormick lush
Binder.
1 8 ot McCormick Pull I : 1er
LIVE STOCK
19 Head of Horses and Mules
1 Horse Mule, 3 yrs. old, wt.
1100.
1 Horse Mule, 8 yrs. old, wt.
1000.
1 Mare Mule, 7 yrs. -*ld, wt. 1030
1 Bay Gelding, 8 yrs. tld, \v..
1450.
Mimirk Hay Stacke:.
1 bn Cormick Lull Rake.
1 Dabi Self-lift Rake.
! . cCt• nick Mower.
!.. ihvi kee Rake.
1 Three Bottom Dutchman T-.ng
Plow—14-inch.
1 John Deere 18-inch S ;.ky
1 low.
1 J ha F. iv 16-inch W; ! ing
Plow.
1 Four Sec-lion P. & O. H ow.
1 6-foot Uark Double Dis
1 Smith Reversible 8-foot Lusk.
1 Acme 8-'V. Harrow.
1 3-ineh Mo l ie Wagon.
1 314-inch 1 in Wagon.
1 3%-inch \ una Wagon.
1' 314 -inch. SU.debakeç Wagon.
1 Iron Wagon. 1 Light F ck.
1 Buggy. 1 Pair Bobs. 1 Ca.ter
7 Sets Work Harness.
1 Set Buggy Harness.
1 Complete Riding Outfit.
1 Complete 10-foot Windmill.
Tools, Chains and other things
too numerous to mention.
iVj.o
1 Gray .Mare, 8 yrs. old, wt. 1400
1 Bay Mare, 7 yrs old, wt. 1360.
1 Bay Mare, 8 yis. old, w 1400.
1 Bay Mare, 8 yis. old, w . 1360.
1 Bay Gelding, 4 yrs. oil, wt.
1400.
1 Brown Gelding, 9 yrs. old, wt.
3250.
1 Sor-el Mara, 9 yrs. old, wt.
1200 .
1 Bay Gelding, 3 yrs. old, wt.
1200 .
1 Bay Mare, 9 yrs. old, wt. 1100.
1 Gray Mare, 8 yrs. old, wt. 1100
1 Saddle Ma e, 9 yis. oi l .wt
3100.
1 Spring Colt.
3 Yearling Colts.
17 Pi d of Cattle.
K>w mi-king,
ow chat
: io four pair
twin h'. u.r caL es in the last
four years, and six head of
whi b are : * , ' : s sale.
10 Heal of Y
yaar-uMs.
1 Red Pole Y'.ai ling Bu i.
2 Calves.
4 gr, i "ilch Cow
n which :s
:
and two
TERMS OF SALE—All sums under $20.00 CASH, over that amount
time will be given until October 1st, 1919, on approved bankable
notes bearing 10 per cent interest.
The undersigned has purchased the lunch and
turned it over to the Red Cross Ladies that they
RED CROSS
LUNCH—
may realize a little from it.
Owners
J. G. VENNIGERHOLZ, Clerk
SMITH BROTHERS
CHAS. E. WALKS, Auctioneer
he took off again under black clouds
which hung as low as 600 feet and
with a strong south wind along the
ground. He climbed to 300 feet and
there found clear air and a brisk
north wind. Corn husks blown from
the ground followed him and birds
carried by this wind flew above him
at 5000 feet, an unusual altitude for
them. He finished his 1700 mile flight
at 3:30 in the afternoon, it having
taken him since 6:30 in the morning
to fly from Fort Worth, a distance
of some 295 miles.

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