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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, November 25, 1918, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1918-11-25/ed-1/seq-2/

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The DAILY STAR-MIRROR
___I
Published every evening except Sun
day, at Moscow, Idaho.
GEO. N. LAMPHERE, Publisher.
The Official Newspaper of the City of
Moscow.
Entered as second-class matter Oct.
16. 1911, at the postoffice of Moscow.
Idaho, under the Act of Congress of
March, 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
■JDeliverd by carrier to any part of city
Per Month .60c
Three Months .'
Six Months . 2.76
One Year . 6.00
By Mail
(outside of city and on rural routes) :
Per Month .40c
Three Months .$1.16
"Six Months . 2.25
One Year . 4.00
The (Weekly) Idaho Post:
Per Year
$1.50
MEMBER OF ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively
entitled to the use for republication
of all news-dispatches credited to it
or not otherwise credited in this paper
and also the local news published
therein.
All rights of republication of
•pecial dispatches herein are also re
served.
RAISING TELEPHONE RATES.
Next week a hearing will be held in
Moscow on the application of the Mos
cow Telephone & Telegraph company
for permission to increase its rates in
town and on the rural lines. Naturally
the people of Moscow oppose such an
Increase. They are getting tired of hav
ing the price of everything they use
raised. There will be strong opposition
to the petition which will be considered
iy the public utilities commission of the
state.
The tendency to raise the price of eve
rything is being carried so far that the
people are becoming resentful. Govern
ment control of railroads resulted in an
*1 vanee of about 20 per cent in freight
Did passenger rates and a great de
fcrioration in the quality of the serv
ies rendered. Now the government has
taken over control of the telegraph lines
and the first thing that is done is to
ask an increase of rates.
Spokane is fighting the telephone
trust there, which has been granted per
mission to raise its rates and the mayor
and city attorney have gone to Washing
ton to take the matter up personally
with Postmaster General Burleson. In
the meantime more than 4300 patroiis of
the Spokane telephone have signed
an agreement to discontinue patroniz
ing the company, so that if the com
pany wins in its fight to hold the rates
at the present high level it will fie a
heavy loser and the people of Spokane
will not have as good a service as they
had in the past. There will be more
than 4300 homes or business houses
•without telephone service and the loss
of revenue from these will more than
offset the increased rates charged those
who continue to patronize the company
because they cannot help it.
LET US HAVE PATIENCE.
There is much merit in the commun
ication by the Rev. J. Quincy Biggs,
of the Christian church, published else
where in this issue in regard to the late
ness of the announcement that there
would be no Sunday school in Moscow
yesterday. The ministers naturally feel
aggreived and, as the Rev. Mr. Biggi
says that they "did not get a square
deal."
But we must have patience. The health
officers are very busy. They are work
ing day and night trying to save the
lives of those who are afflicted. Every
doctor in Moscow has worked unceas
ingiy in caring for the many cases of
influenza. They have had little rest and
little time to prepare notices to the
public.
The patrons of the public schools can
have the same complaint that the min
isters have in regard to the Sunday
school. The notice that there would be
no school in Moscow this week should
r
Sps ! ' v ,
Ss
The Strength of Years
m
m
If it means anything to you, as a prospective de
positor, that the First National Bank has been identi
fied with Moscow progress for one-third of a cen
tury—
That it has kept pace With the growth of this
community during thirty-six eventful yean, and
conscientiously lived up to its policies of safety and
conservatism during that period—
Then this will be an important consideration in
choosing the banking connection that is to serve
your interests during the years to come.
m.
i
%
i
£
m
The First National Bank
OF MOSCOW
m.
Established in the year 1882
i
J. S. HBCKATHCRN. Cashier
W. L. Payne, F resident
k
\
liave l,ecn published Friday ms Lead T
Saturday, Imt The Star-Mirror could
not wa j t with its Friday evening issue
1 for the senool hoard and heaPh of
deci le the question for they
still undecided when the paper
went to press. As a consequence those
living on rural routes did not learn un
vvould be no
ficers to
were
.. , t ,.... there
1,1 ™ U -' 'hat there
j school Monday. \\ c requested that the
I statement lie given out Friday evening,
: but the board could not get all of its
,
members and the health officers who
[ were looking after their many cases of
illness, together in time for Friday's
;
P a P er -
| These things are annoying and, at first
1 glance, seem unnecessary.
j
|
But, before
condemn, let us think of the vast
lofetd the health officers, the school
hoard and others arc carrying. The
school hoard is composed of men of
business and this work is only q, "side
issue" and is apt to be overlooked. It
would have been much better had the
notices that there would be no public
or Sunday schools been published not
later than Friday, but no one is really
to blame --and we belive that all have
done their duty as they saw it and that
any mistakes have been because of those
making them having too much to do.
Let us he patient and also he thankful
that Moscow has escaped with as light
a loss of life and as little suffering and
inconvenience as she has.
we
EVENTUALLY, WHY NOT NOW?
The United States will eventually
have to take over the government of
Mexico. Why not do it now, or as soon
as "the hoys get home"? We cannot
stand the Mexican government as a
neighbor. That country is as unfit for
seltf-government as is Russia, under
Bolshevik! control. As long as Mex
ico is governed by Mexicans our south
ern border will not be safe. We should
take over that country and make it safe
for white people to live in. We can
do it now. with impunity. Had we start
ed before the great European war we
would have had Japan to fight. Now it
is different. With our army and navy
developed to their present strength and
our power so well known, no other
country would dare interfere.
If we do not take Mexico over and
govern it we should at least use the air
planes built for service in Europe to
defend our southern border. If the Uni
ted States will station a few American
"aces" with modern fighting planes
armed with-machine guns along the line
between the United States and Mexico,
with telephonic or telegraphic connec
tion every mile and give these men in
structions to follow the first Mexican
raiding party across, the line into Mex
ico and continue until the last of the
bandits is killed, the raiding of Amer
ican farms find cattle ranches will
cease. There will he use for these air
planes in that country and the Mexicans
need the lesson.
THERE'S THE ANSWER.
"What security has the United
States for the billions of dollars loaned
to Great Britain," asks an anonymous
mutton head of St. Louis. The security
of as sublime a courage, as invincible
a spirit, «s unwavering a faith and as
knightly an example of self-sacrifice as
nonpartizan league, to whom they paid
$16 for one year's membership, gets
the annaW of the human race disclose.
Next?—Houston Post.
BS 1*8 M
HELPLUL HERBERT.
What a friend we have in Hoover,
All the skins and thieves to bare.
What a surplus-fat remover,
All our hungry pangs to share.
Ever present help in trouble,
Guide, philosopher and friend.
Pass the shark-meat and fried stubble.
Will this conflict never end?
■—American Motherhood.
Fa Isa
It will he cheering news to the farm
ers of Idaho who have been contending
with short crops and denying themselves
of all luxuries and many necessities, to
learn that A. C. Townley, head of the
$300 per month salary and $1200 per
month expenses. This is the sworn
statement of the treasurer of the non
partisan league given in the bankruptcy
proceedings of Mr. Townley, who
"failed" for $300,000. The farmers who
have had difficulty in meeting their
payments on Liberty bonds, machinery,
etc., will hardly feel that Mr. Townley
is entitled to draw $1500 per month or
$18,000 per pear from the money col
lected from the farmers for membership
in the league. Yet Townley and his
associates claim they collected $320,000
from the farmers of Idaho for memher
We wonder how many farmers of Latah
renew [
ship in the league and they do not have
to account to any one for this money»
and neighboring counties will
their membership in the nonpartizan i
league at $16 per renewal. I
All the Teutonic powers arc sur
rendering except Milwaukee, which has
just elected Victor Berger, German so
cialist, to congress.—Chicago
News.
Daily
When we learn what the party lead- |
ers in Germany are saying about each !
other then we
will he able to judge
whether it is a real republic.—St. Louis
Star.
!
i
j
i
!
If Uncle Sam decides to finish up that ,
Mexican job he has the tools all handy
—Newark News.
m. M 1»
It is safe to say that President Wil
son will never again wake a sleeping
elephant.—Boston Herald.
Germany's greatest work of art is j
that final "bust" of the kaiser.—Brook- (
lyn Eagle.
PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS
:
DR. J. N. CLARKE Physician, New
Creighton Bl k. _ Ph o ne_139.- j
DR, W. A. ADAIR—Physician, Creigh
ton Blk, Phone 85..
DR. C. L. GRITMAN—Physician and j
surgeon, 720 So. Main. Phone 27.
_ r t, i
Ear 3L and SoaL GlIsses i
Fitted. Office of Dr. Aspray, 303
3rd Ave. Phone 177.
-
DR. W. M. HATFIELD—Osteopath,
Creighton Bldg. Phone 48.
Phone 33J,'
DR. F. M. LE ITCH—Physician, Com
mercial Bldg. Phone 223Y.
DR. J. J. HERRINGTON — Office
over Willis' Drug Store. Phone 346:
Phone 187R.
OSTEOPATH
CHIROPRACTIC
DR. ZONA BIGGS—Chiropractic, Steele
Bldg. Phone 331H.
DENTISTS
DR. I. R. BOYD—Dentist, Creighton i
Bldg. Phone 168R. _ |
DR. H. J. SMITH—Dentist, Urquhart
Bldg. Phone 9,
DR J A. McDANlELS—Dentist, First
T 'nnk BUIg. Phone 229,
DR. T. B. McBRYDE—Dentist, Brown
B'k. Phone 33L.
DR. L. A. PHILIPS—Dentists, Skatta
boe Bldg. Phone 14L.
LAWYERS
G. G. PICKETT—Lawyer, cor. First
and Main. Phone 2. -
A. L. MORGAN—Lawyer, Urquhart
Bldg. Phone 75.
FRANK L. MOORE—Attorney-at-law,
Commercial Blk, Phone 81.
H. OVERSMITH — Atttorney-at
Law. Urquhart Bldg. Phone 208.
A.
ORLAND & LEE—Attorncys-at-Law,
First Natl. Bank Bldg. Phones Or
Hnd 104. Lee 104L.
H R. SMITH—Attorney-at-Law, First
Natl. Bank Bldg., Third St. Entrance.
r> honc 43 Y
JOHN NISBET—Attorney-at-Law, 1st
Natl. Bank Bldg. Phone 131J.
J. H. FORNEY — Attorney - at - Law-,
Commercial Blk. Phone 78.
ROY O. JOHNSON—Attorney-at-Law,
Commercial Blk. Phone 81.
SLPPINGER & OGDEN — Attorneys
at-Law. New Creighton Blk. Phone,
G W. Snppingcr 83 ; Scott, Ogden
83 H.
FLORISTS
SCOTT BROS — Proprietors, North
Main. Phone 289.
VETERINARY
DR. E. T. BAKER —Assistant State
Veterinarian. Residence Sixth and
Washington, phone 243.
DR. J. D. ADAMS — Veterinary, 220 j
South Asbury. Phone 15Y.
AUCTIONEEP
CHAS. B. WALKS—Auctioneer. Urqn
hart Blgd. Phone 278.
;
FOR FIRST CLASS SHOE
REPAIRING
go to
J. N. FRIEDMAN
HARNESS SHOP
A
MMjiyO QPRVIPF
TTIIlO OLilvIuL UllUOu
Yank Ambulance Driver Deco
rated for Heroic Work.
Wounded In Head and Legs He Cares
for Injured Man, Then Crawls
to Hospital.
Paris.—Several wounds in the head
and both legs were not sufficient to de
ter Private Albert S. Hartwell from
aiding another wounded American sol
dier. Suffering Intense pains from his
wounds, received when a shell broke
near him, Hartwell carried the other
wounded boy to a dressing station for
help. His bravery and self-sacrifice
have brought him the award of the dis
tingulshed service cross from General
Pushing.
Hartwell, an American, had been
living in Paris with his mother, Mrs.
Pauline Nellie Hartwell, 16 Rue Pone
reu. He Is a member of the United
States army ambulance, serving with
the French army, and had been gassed
on July 18.
The citation reads;
"He repeatedly drove his ambulance
over a road east of Reims that was
under bombardment of gas and ex
pi os typ shells. On one occasion, while
cranking his car, he was knocked
sev
eral yards by the explosion of a shell,
yet he continued his work. Another
day his car was hit by a shell and bad
damaged and he himself was badly
wounded in the head and both legs. In
spile «qf his wounds he carried a
wounded man who was In the arobu
lance to a place of safety, made him
comfortable, and then crawled to a
ly
dressing station for assistance."
YANK GENERAL IN RETREAT
First Time He Ever Did It, but It
Was From a French Lass,
Not Duty.
A Port In France.—It was all quite
new to the general. He had just land
ed and after twd days in port was
ma kj n g iit s W ay from Here to There
(n o, neither of these is the name of a
French town),
The general was a soldierly figure,
dignified as most generals are, and
^ hlm in his compartment of the
first class oar were the members of
his staff. The day was hot and the
voyage uneventful until the train
pulled up at a junction.
On the adjoining track was a train
going in the opposite direction. The
general's carriage came to a halt di
rectly opposite the third class com
partments, filled with peasants in
their quaint costumes and bonnets.
The general leaned out interestedly
and surveyed the assorted crowd. As
he leaned out a comely young girl in
the other compartment did the same
thing.
'Elloa,'
said she to the general.
The latter looked rather startled.
"Er-er-Helloa !" he responded rather
faintly.
"American," accused the girl tri
umphantly. "Me speek Eengleesh."
"Oui," admitted the general.
"I love you," returned the fair one,
with a burst of laughter.
It was too much. The general re
treated for the first time in his life,
amid the discreet snickers of the mem
bers of his staff and roars from the
rest of the car.
LONGEST NAME IN DRAFT
Atlanta Likely to Lose Nikitag Pap
panikolopolous. Who Is
No. 4.
Altanta, Ga.—Nikitag Pappanlkolo
polous, Atlanta, is right up in the
forefront of the list of men in the neuj
draft. In fact, he is No. 4 in division
No. 2, and It appears that Atlanta Is
about to lose Mr. Pappanlko—etc. Un
less he has some brothers, Mr. Pappan
lko—etc. undoubtedly has the longest
name in the Atlanta directory, and
just what the officers out at Camp
Gordon will do with It in case Mr.
Pappani—etc. is taken there remains
to be seen. However, they've had con
siderable experience with names and
Mr. Pappan—etc. needn't be a bit sur
prised if they make his moniker some
thing short and snappy, like "Nick
Papp."
;
TATTOOED HEAD OF
KAISER BETRAYS HUN
t

Altoona, Pa.—When Paul
Kraull appeared before the ex
aminers of the Blair Four draft S
>:
board he exhibited a breast on >;
which was tattoeed a life-size
>:
head of the kaiser adorned with
helmet, plumes and black eagles.
An investigation revealed that ;♦!
Kraull had escaped from a Ger
' man ship interned in an Ameri •
can port. He had waived de
ferrod cla^iflcatii . and wanted
to join the American army. He >;
was held for further investlga
>:
>:
tion.
As the Ye,k Saw It.
London.—Pershing's offensive has
revived a month-oid story which may
not have reached America, though It
reached the music hall stage here.
"An American, eh," said one of the
perennial casual inquirers to one of
the first American soldiers seen in
'What are you, Y. M.. C.
England.
"No," drawled the Yank. "I reckon
we're the Salvatlna Army,"
Thompson Insurance . Agency
Fire Insurance, Automobile and
Plate Glass Insurance, Fidelity and
Casualty Bonds
J. G. Vennigerhalz, Prop.
Moscow. Idaho. .
CHICHESTER S PILLS
W __ TDK DIAMOND BRAND.
U4Ih) A«k f««F UruKtot fcy
Ch ULw tw ■ Diui..4 Brut
P11U In B«4 nwt 0.14 metnlllc
boxes, assied with Blue Ribbon. v
cH-cukStek s
DIAMOND
BRAND PILLS, for M
years known as Best, Safest, Always Reliable
SOLD BY DRUGGISTS EVERYWHERE
YOUR
MONEY
Draws interest when
deposited in this bank.
It earns nothing when
carried around in your
pocket.
an
FIRST TRUST
S SAVINGS BANK
Inland Market
10,000 chickens
wanted. Highest
market price paid.
Monuments
THE MOSCOW MARBMT.
WORKS
George H. Moody, Proprietor
Has the finest line of Monimenh
and all Kinds of Marble Work to
be found in the Inland Empire
PRICES REASONABLE
See Our Work Before Ordering
xtrolas and
Victor Records
Sherfey's Book Store
1
Moscow, Idaho
If It's New We Are Sure the
First to Have It
*
*
*
Hotel Moscow
*
■4*
. •
4
TOM WRIGHT, Prop.
4*
4
4
*
Thoroughly Modern
A
4
FIRST CLASS GRILL
AUTO BUS AT ALL TRAINS "
A
4 *
You will find you save more
and live better if you trade at
the
THIRD STREET
MARKET
CHICKENS, GEESE, DUCKS
AND HIDES WANTED
PHONE 248
L. M. KITLEY
CLASSIFIED ADS
FOR RENT—Rooms
FOR RENT—TWO LIGHT HOUSE
keeping rooms, partly furnished.
No children. 501 East Sixth St.
51-63
APARTMENTS FOR RENT AT
the Idaho Hotel ; steam heat. Phone
295.
49tf

j FOR RENT—LIGHT HOUSEKEEP
310 So. Lilly. Phone 338.
47tf
mg rooms.
■FOR RENT —A ROOM WITH OR
j without sleeping porch ; hot and cold
>'atcr ; modern conveniences ; price rea
I I nabe. 425 East Third St. Mrs. D.
• quhart.
13tf
FOR RENT—FURNISHED APART
ments and furnished rooms at
Eggac's apartments. Phone 206H.
231-tf
FOR TRADE
FOR TRADE— IMPROVED IS
acres close to Moscow for larger place.
Write Box 98, Rt. 2 or call 9408. 44-50
WANTED—TO EXCHANGE ONE
two bottom 14-inch gang plow for
three bottom. Phone 9251. J. H. Dye.
289-«
FOR RENT—Houses
FOR RENT
Bungalow ; paved streets ; close in,
three minutes' walk from Main St. ; $20
per month ; automobile garage, coal and
wood bins.
A NEW, MODERN
Phone 137Z.
44-50
FOR RENT—FIVE ROOM HOUSE .
Corner Main and Monroe. Phone
44-tf
1Y. J/ E. Mudgett.
FOR RENT—A 7-ROOM MODERN
house, close in. C. H. Patten. 43-56
FOR RENT—AN 8-ROOM MODERN
house near the domitory. Phone 170J.
Mrs. John Shannon.
3tf
FOR RENT—2-ACRE TRACT WITH
5-room house, cheap. Phone 290R.
32tf
WANTED—Miscellaneous
WANTED—20 CARS OF U. S.
Grade No. 1 White and Russet »
potatoes. Phone or write Garfield
Fruit & Produce Co., Garfield, Wash.
40-tf
WANTED—GOOD LIVE DEALER
to sell the best truck on the market.
Can make deliveries 1 to 5 tons. Write
Rochester Motor Co., 1012 Sprague
Ave., Spokane, Wash.
235-tf
WANTED TO RENT—AN OFFICE
desk. Telephone 352.
291-tf
WANTED—100 TONS GOOD PEA
Call or write Garfield c
Fruit & Produce Co., Garfield, Wash.
40-tf
straw.
FOR SALE—Real Estate
F(5R TRADE
IMPROVED TWO
acres for small car. Phone 290R. 31tf
FOR SALE—A 5-ROOM MODERN
residence; good cellar and garage.
Phone 263H. Fred Stone.
16-tf
FOR SALE—8-ROOM MODERN
residence ; choice location, corner lot, "
garage, etc. Phone 267Y. Sam SHvey.
255-tf.
FOR SALE —HOUSE AND LOT,
corner First and Polk Sts. Inquire
244«
Mrs. Wm. Arnett.
FOR SALE — 80 ACRES THREE
miles east of Moscow ; house and barn.
Write E. R. Fuller, Lewiston, Idaho, or
s ee N, G, Gilbertson, adjoining farm. 6tf
FOR SALE—Livestock
FOR SALE—COW AND 2 CALVES;
3 voting heifer calves. Phone 926X5.
48-50
FOR SALE—YOUNG PIGS 8 WEEKS
old. Phone 9188. A. Gambel. 47-53
FOR SALE—Miscellaneous
4
FOR SALE—ONE BUREAU, ONE
bird's-eye maple bedstead, one brass
bedstead, one oak table, two rockers, one »
lied spring. E. H. Storer, 1107 Deakin *
Ave. Phone 41L.
47tf
MILK FOR SALE—10 QUARTS FOR
46-52
Phone 105R.
$1 ; delivered.
FOR SALE—24 HEAD SHROPSHIRE
sheep. Write A. E. Alexander. Phone
Farmer 942K5.
•32tf
JOLTNE - KNIGHT 7-PASSEN*iR
touring car, in good condition, for sale
r trade. Moscow Auto & Supply Co.
283tf
SELDEN TRUCKS SOLD ON DE
ferred payment pian. Write Rochester „
' Motor Co., 1012 Sprague Ave., Spo
kane, Wash.
235-tI
FOR SALE—APPLES and SQUASH.
Phone 932X1. 49-55"
FOR SALE —MAHOGANY BED
stead, mattress and springs ; cost of
three articles was $125 ; will sell for $50
cash, if taken immediately; articles all
as good as new. Call at 115 Van Buren
or Phone No. 88.
49tf
LOST AND FOUND
FOUND — A WATCH ON THE
road between Moscow and tire ceme
tery. Phone 273L.
49-51
LOST—A POCKET BOOK, EITHER
at David's store or Corner Drug:
Store Saturday evening. 209 East
3rd or leave at Star-Mirror.
50
MISCELLANEOUS
IF THE BOY WHO TOOK THE
package from the steps of Mrs.
Duggan will return at once he will
50-tf - ,
avoid arrest.
CASH PAID FOR LIBERTY BONDS. ,
Metropolitan Investment Co. C. IT.
Patten, Mgr.
48tf
THOSE WISHING ODD JOBS DONE
phone Ray Stevens, c-o Plummer's n
Cafe._ 25-tf
STRAYED FROM PASTURE NEAR
Uniontown, a white pony. Notify
Thomas Brown, Moscow, Idaho, Rt. 3.
50-56

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