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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, November 27, 1918, Image 4

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1918-11-27/ed-1/seq-4/

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I
Thursday and Friday
Norma
Talmadge
in
GHOSTS OF
YESTERDAY
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NORMA TALMADGE
"•T6MOST8 OF VUTERDAy*
I
News Weekly-Arbuckle Comedy
Children 11c
Matinee 2:30 Thursday
Adults 22c
COMING MONDAY AND TUESDAY
The Picture You've Waited for
PERSHING'S
Seats On Sale Thursday.
CRUSADERS"
MOSCOW PEOPLE 10
BE HOSTS TOMORROW
MANY HOMES WILL BE THROWN
OPEN FOR VISITORS ON
THANKSGIVING DAY
i omorrow will be a happy day for
ly people with the war over and
jfie epidemic lessening its hold on the
people, it is a time for all of us to
be thankful. Moscow homes are show
ing their hospitality in entertaining
but most of the parties are quiet
gatherings of relatives and friends.
President and Mrs. Lindley will
spend the day with the soldier boys
at the mess hall to make the day
happy for them. '
Mrs. J. J. Day is entertaining at a
home party of 22 guests. The guests
are her father, Mr. Mix, G. P. Mix
and family, Frank Mix and family,
Mr. and Mrs. C. Richardson, Mr. and
Mrs. Wm. Marsh, Sherman Mix, Mrs.
John Mix and R. Notfsger of Oro
fino, Miss Stevens, and Mr. and Mrs.
Ed Kitts.
J, J. Day went to Portland to be
with Miss Bernice, and Mrs. R. Nofts
ger is also there. Jerome Jr., is at
the home party in Moscow.
Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Gibson will have
as guests tomorrow, Dr. Adair and
family, Mrs. Lyons, Mr. and Mrs. Jay
Gibson of Spokane, Miss Sweet, Mr.
Yagey and several of the S. A. T. C.
boys.
Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Cornelison are
entertaining Jacob Lutes and Floyd
Myers, S. A. T. C. boys from Fraser,
Idaho.
Mr. and Mrs. John Canham have as
guests Mr. and Mrs. R. N. Miller of
Pullman. Mr. Miller is a brother of
Miss June Miller.
Mr. and Mrs. P. C. Olesen and
daughter, Miss Ella, will dine with
Mr. and Mrs. P. H. Teare, who live
east of Moscow. Mr. and Mrs. Henry i
Walker are also guests at the Teare :
home.
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The Strength of Years
If it means anything to you, as a prospective de
positor, that the First National Bank has been identi
fied with Moscow progress for one-third of a cen
tury—
That it has kept pace with the growth of this
community during thirty-six eventful years, and
conscientiously lived up to its policies of safety and
conservatism during that period—
Then this will be an important consideration in
choosing the banking connection that is to serve
your interests during the years to come.
The First National Bank
OF MOSCOW
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Established in the year 1882
W. L. Payne, President
J. Heckathorn, Cashier
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WE BUY ALL ISSUES OF LIBERTY BONDS
Your banker is our reference
If you are compelled through force of circumstances to sell your
bonds, take them to your banker and ask him to draw a sight draft
on us with bonds attached, or send the bonds to us yourself by reg
istered mail. We will remit on day received at the best market value.
Telephone, wire, or write for quotations on Liberty bonds or any se
curity quotation*.
IVRINQ WHITEHOUSE COMPANY
Davenport Hotel Bldg.
Box 25
Spokane, Washington
Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Stewart have
home party of Mrs. T. G. Rees of
Portland and Mrs. Ida Stevens and
family.
Mr. and Mrs. Frances Jenkins will
entertain E. M. Hulme and family at
a home dinner.
Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Porter will
have as guests Mr. and Mrs. W. H.
Connor, Mr. and Mrs. Otto Conner,
and Mrs. C. Campbell and son, Rich
ard.
Mr. and Mrs. T. A. Meeker are en
tertaining Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Langdon
and Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Stanton and
family for the day. Their son, Gerald,
will have as guests several of his fra
ternity brothers.
Mr. and Mrs. T. Dowdy are to have
a real family reunion at their home,
Those invited are; W. D. Morgar
eidge, W. F. Morgareldge and family,
E. O. Thompson and family, Mrs.
Ainsley and children, J. Nolan and
family and Mr. and Mrs. E. Zedicker.
Mr. and Mrs. J. R Collins are en
tertaining Dr. and Mrs. J. A. Mc
Daniel Miss Camille and Allen,
Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Cahill are hav
ing just home folks, Mr. and Mrs.
Rodener and son, Jack.
Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Armbruster will
have as guests Mr. and Mrs. Peter
Fox and 14 of the S. A. T. C. boys
whose homes are at Nez Perce and
Gillette, Wyoming. After a splendid
dinner the entertainment will take, the
form of dancing and billiards, with
a number of young women in for the
afternoon.
Mr. and Mrs. H. Whittier will have
as guests the families of H. H. Simp
son and C. N. Lussier,
Mrs. L. A. Torsen will entertain her
sister, Miss Effie Farris of Palouse.
Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Yost will enter
tain at dinner Mr. and Mrs. E. Mac
Martin and their neice, Frances. Their
son, Leonard, of the S. A. T. C. will
have thVee of his soldier friends as
guests. Eber Wilson, Paul Hinchliff
and M. Rugg.
Mr. and Mrs. A. J, Simonson are
entertaining Private Salisbury and
Sergeant Gerald Healy of the S. A.
T. C.
Mr. and Mrs. M. E. Washburn will
have as guests, H. Wilson and family,
Mr. Wilson from Illinois and Fred
Allbright.
Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Wallace
having a home party, entertaining
Mr. and Mrs. G. Sanders, Miss Ella
Wallace and Mother Wallace.
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Patterson will
have as guests, M. K. Smith of Gen
j esee, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Baxter
j Mr. and Mrs. I. L. Osterhout of Col
fax.
Mr. and Mrs. Ph. Soulen will
tertain at dinner tomorrow, Mr. and
Mrs. M. E. Lewis and Miss Schell.
Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Orland will en
tertain their son and family, Mr. and
Mrs. H. H. Orland and Lewis.
Mr. and Mrs. F. A. David will have
just home folks, Mr. and Mrs. Homer
David and children, Mr. and Mrs.
Howard David, Mr. and Mrs. H.
Smith and Harvey Smith.
The Gamma Phi Beta sorority will
have a house party tomorrow enter
taining the young men of the fra
ternities.
I'
Thanksgiving Services in Moscow.
President Wilson has asked that
this Thanksgiving be especially mark
ed by acts of prayer and worship to
Almighty God, for victory and peace.
The following services are offered:
9 a. m.—(not 8:30 as announced
previously)—Holy Communion and
brief address at Episcopal church.
10:30 a. m.—Union Thanksgiving
service at Methodist church. Preacher,
Rev. Wayne Snoddy. This is a com
munity service and it is hoped that
all public bodies and all churches will
be fully represented. Moscow should
take full advantage of this oppor
tunity for uniting in Thanksgiving
for victory.
7 p. m.—Brief service in Episcopal
church.
7:30 p. m.—Prayer and praise meet
ing in Methodist church auditorium.
UNIVERSITY TO HAVE
BUT ONE DAY'S VACATION
There will be classes at the Uni
versity of Idaho Friday as usual. The
war department is allowing but one
day's vacation and insists upon the
usual work the day before and the
day after Thanksgiving. Tomorrow
will be a real holiday for every one
and the university students are to
have a royal time and a splendid
feast, but the next day they will be
expected to take up their work as
usual. The war department is de
sirous of having much of the time
lost through the influenza epidemic
made up by working on days that
would otherwise be devoted to vaca
tion.
a
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PRINCETON SCHOOLS OPENED
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 25
PRINCETON.—Mrs. Ester Barnett
and little daughter returned home to
Seattle Friday.
Gurnsey accompanied them as far as
Palouse.
Loyd Graves came home from the
hospital at Bovill, where he was two
weeks with the influenza, and visited
Arveld and back Tues
Her mother, Mrs.
day.
Miss Lucy Livingston is on the sick
list with tonsilitis for a week.
Hersei Trible was home on a fur
lough and visited with his brother
and relatives, returning Monday to
camp.
Mrs. R. Rosmusen is visiting
friends in Potlatch this week.
Mrs. Edgar Adair is on the sick
list with lagrippe.
Professer Little, from Moscow, was
a business caller Saturday. He has
rented his farm to James Rosmusen.
Mr. Ingal, who has a farm south of
Harvard, is moving back on his farm
at Fairbanks and Dave Brooks will
move on the place for a year.
Mr. A. Rule and sister were in
Palouse Monday. His sister will
leave for the east soon. She is 75.
School opened Monday, the teachers,
Miss Brown and Miss Ruth Phelps,
Mr nl and IS s£ Lachner left Sat
urday for Kennewick to visit his
brother, Dan.
Mr. and Mrs. C. Hodge have moved
back on their farm. He did not have
I
go camp.
Master John Stevison of Spokane,
visited his Uncle Frank's family here
a week.
Mrs. Kleer returned to Avon Sun
day with her twin girls, Alma Zelma
and Irma Thelma.
B
COVE PRECINCT FURNISHES
MANY INTERESTING ITEMS
agf The schools opened Monday morn
I ing after having been closed for five
weeks on account of influenza.
Robert Mafors is convalescing after a
severe attack of influenza at the I. W.
Lazelle home.
Miss Elva Boiler, who has been visit
I ing at the Curtis Lazelle home for the
past month, returned to her home near
Potlatch Monday.
Mrs. Ed. Spray and little son of
Moscow are visiting at the Bert Howell
home.
Miss Edith L. Webster of Garfield
1 visited at the L. A. Somiville home last
I week.
I Mr. and Mrs. W. E. McCroskey of
Palouse visited in the Cove Sunday.
Mrs. W. A. Crosthw(aite of San
Francisco arrived here last week and I
will make her home with her parents,
Mr. and Mrs. Win. Schultz, until the re
turn of her husband from Siberia.
A fine .baby girl was born Tuesday,
Noverhber 19th, to Mr. and Mrs. Ross
Culton.
Mrs. C. H. Houge and daughter.
Edith of Tacoma, are visiting old
friends in the Cove.
A boy was born Monday, November
18th, to Mr. and Mrs. Martin Ander
son.
Hotel Moscow Arrivals.
Nov. 26.—J. O. Tracy, L. B. Cot
tingham, O. L. Jones, Ï*. H. Anderson,
A. H. Pape, G. A. Sherley, Fred E.
Taylor, G. P. Ekeland, J. E. Lenane,
Geo. Wright and wife, Spokane; Wal
ter Ricks, Portland; E. T. Boaden,
Rochester; Mrs. Bryce Smith, Ellison
White Chautauqua; J. H. Jacobson,
Blaekfoot; C. J. Smith, Seattle; J. D.
Ingram, Genesee; L. Schaufelberger,
Seattle; F. J. Peters, Coifax; E. J.
Coffey. Portland; J. F. Horne, Se
attle; Fred Lane, Mrs. Anton Burch,
Pat Malone, Bovill; Henry G. An
drews, Rochester; R. L. Stewart, Se
attle.
RAMBO FAMILY HAS BEEN
SORELY AFFLICTED
Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Rambo, of Lew
iston, whose son died a few days ago,
have had more than their share of
trouble. Mrs. Rambo was stricken
with a nervous collapse and two
daughters who came home ' to assist
in the care of their brother were both
stricken with influenza, one being
I taken down within an hour after her
brother passed away. Both are re
covering, however and are now re
garded as out of danger . The family
wish to thank the people of Moscow
and vicinity and the Cornwall Sunday
school class for many kindnesses
shown them during the sickness and
funeral of their son and brother.
B
Keep Up War Insurance.
Every soldier and sailor should keep
up his War Risk Insurance, even if
the relative named as beneficiary has
not yet received the insurance certifi
cate. The insurance certificates are
being mailed from Washington as fast
as they can be made out, but the in
surance is effective even if they
never arrive, so long as the premiums
are paid. The War Risk Insurance
bureau desires to have this informa
tion reach the family of every man
who has taken out insurance, for some
men in the service, thinking they
would receive no benefit because of
non-receipt of certificates by the
beneficiaries, have stopped their pay
ments. The bureau of War Risk In
surance has sent out 2,500,000 certifi
cates already. More than $35,000,
000,000 worth of insurance has been I
taken out by the men in the service.
Applications are coming in at the
rate of $1,000,000,000 a week. It is
unnecessary to write to Washington
for certificates. They will come in
due time, if payments are kept up.
THE FIRST SNOW OF THE
SEASON FELL LAST NIGHT
For the first time this winter the
ground is white with snow. The snow
began falling yesterday afternoon and
continued into the night, about two
inches falling. As there was no wind
the snow covers the ground to a uni-
form depth and has not drifted. Today
is bright, clear and cool but pleasant.
Farmers say the snow fall will be ben-
eficial to fall wheat and are hoping
for more to cover the wheat to a depth
of several inches. This is the first real
winter weather this section has had. The
fall has been one of the nicest known
here, with mild weather continuing
later than ever known before. Many
trees still carry a large portion of their
leaves which still retain much, of their
green color. An immense amount of
fall plowing and other fall work has
been done and the entire country has
seldom been better prepared for win-
ter than it is now. It is estimated that
90 per cent of the land intended for
spring crop has been plowed, which
means an increased yield next year as
spring grain always does better on land
plowed in the fall.
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Bonds.
The war department authorizes the
following: Brig. Gen. Herbert M.
Lord, army liberty loan officer, an
nounces that complete reports of sub
scriptions to the fourth Liberty loan
by the United States Army at home
and abroad have been received. The
total subscriptions amount to $76,
540,550, which include $2,400,500 sub
scribed by the American Expedition
ary forces in France and reported by
General Pershing, and $263,100 by
General Graves. Other subscriptions
came from forces stationed in Hawaii,
Alaska, Panama, the Philippines, and
other territorial possessions of the
United States. The amount subscrib
ed by the army to the fourth loan is
more than three times the amount
of the subscriptions to the third Lib
erty loan.
EXCURSION TRAINS TO
SPOKANE NEXT SATURDAY
Two excursion trains will leave Mos
cow Saturday morning to take Moscow
"rooters" to Spokane for the greatest
hall game of the season when the Uni
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THANKSGIVING
What is ours of the fulness of
life's great store is more than
enough to be thankful for on
this, the world's most wonderful
Thanksgiving Day.
THE FASHION SHOP
STORE CLOSED ALL DAY
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DAVIDS'
THANKSGIVING DAY. 1918, WILL BE FRAUGHT WITH
GREATER SIGNIFICANCE THAN AT ANY OTHER TIME IN
OUR GENERATION. WE FIND OURSELVES UNITED IN A
COMMON CAUSE FOR GIVING THANKS—THAT ONCE UN
ORGANIZED CIVILIZATION HAS BANISHED ORGANIZED
BARBARISM FOREVER.
LET US NOW LOOK FORWARD
WITH CONFIDENCE TO THE RE-BUILDING OF THE WAR
SHATTERED WORLD.
WE ARE GRATEFUL THAT OUR VISION OF THE FU
TURE HELPED US KEEP FAITH WITH OUR CUSTOMERS
THROUGH EARNEST EFFORTS TO CONTINUE LEGITIMATE
PRICES AND BUSINESS "AS USUAL" IN ALL THESE TRY
ING MONTHS.
WE ARE HOPEFUL THAT OUR EFFORTS
SljIALL NOT HAVE BEEN IN VAIN WHEN YOU LIST THE
NAMES OF THOSE FIRMS YOU WISH TO FAVOR WHEN
NORMAL CONDITIONS PREVAIL.
STORE CLOSED ALL DAY TOMORROW.
DAVIDS'
versity of Idaho S. A. T. C. team meets
the Marines, of Mare' Island Navy yard,
the champion football team of the Pa
cific coast. The first train will leave
at 7:30 and will carry S. A. T. C. men
and the team. The second train leaves
at 8 o'clock and will carry civilians.
The low fare of $3.62 for the round
trip, a great reduction from the regular
fare, will be charged. Tickets will be
good for return up to and including De
cember 2. The excursion trains will re
turn to Moscow Saturday evening, leav
ing Spokane at 7 and 7:30 p. m. All who
wish to return may do so. Those who
wish to remain in Spokane can do that
and return on any regular train of this
road.
n
Millions of Letters Coming.
NEW YORK.—The greatest ship
ment of mail from American soldiers
in France ever received, no less than
4,500,000 letters, 'came in yesterday
on the French liner Rochambeau.
These letters
home" were going today to all parts
of the United States on every mail
train.
to the folks back
PRESIDENT MAKES STATEMENT
CONCERNING S. A. T. C.
Hopes to Be Able to Provide Dis
charge for Those Who Wish it.
S. A. T. C. men here in training are
anxious to. learn when they will be dis
charged. Some of them will probably
wish to continue their work here, others
to begin regular academic work, and
still others to return to their homes.
President Lindley says in regard to
this : "We are daily expecting informa
tion concerning the future plans of the
S. A. T. C. I sincerely trust we may
be enabled to provide discharge for all
men who wish to withdraw from the
University, and on the other hand to
admit from the cantonments and officers
training camps all who wish to avail
themselves of the advantage of the Uni
versity.
"A very large number of men in the
camps express the desire to have the
same privilege as the S. A. T. C. for
final discharge from the army."
UNITED WAR WORK DRIVE
REACHES COMPLETION
Final results of the United War
Work Drive at the University are as
follows :
No.
Amount.'
358 Sec. A—S. A. T. C.$1450.00
85 Sec. B—S. A. T. C....
41 Non-S. *\. T. C.
141 Worr^n students.
123 Faculty .
239.00
126.00
494.75
1303.50
748
$3613.25
Card of Thanks.
We wish to express our heartfelt
gratitude and thanks to the many friends
who so kindly helped through the sick
ness and death of our dearly beloved
sister, Mrs. Earl St. John.
' EMERSON SNYDER,
CORA SNYDER.
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Read today's news in today's Star
Mirror.

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