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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, December 02, 1918, Image 1

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The Daily Star-Mirror
MOSCOW. LATAH COUNTY, IDAHO MONDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1918
TOLÜMB VIII
NUMBER 56
PRESIDENT WILSON TELLS OF PROPOSED TRIP
WASHINGTON.—In hia address to a joint session of congress today Presi
dent Wilson formally announced his intention to go to Paris for the peace
conference, saying the allied governments have accepted the peace principle«
he had enunciatel and that it is his paramount duty to be present.
President Wilson said he would keep in close touch by cable and wireless
with congress which would know all that he does on the other side.
Referring to the announcement that the French and British governments
had removed all cable restrictions from the transmission of news he said
be had taken over the American cable systems on the expert advices to
make a unified system available.
President Wilson expressed a hope that he would have the cooperation of
the public and of congress, saying that through the cables and wireless his
constant counsel and advice would be possible.
Much of the address was devoted to the railroad problem for which the
president said he now has no solution to offer. He recommended a careful
study by congress saying it would be a disservice both to the country and
the railroads to return to old conditions under private management without
modification. He declared he stood ready to release the railroads from gov
ernment control whenever a satisfactory plan of readjustment could be
worked out.
President Wilson said he hoped to see a formation of a declaration of
peace "by the time spring has come." He endorsed the new three year naval
building program because he said it would be unwise to attempt to adjust
the American program to the future world policy which is yet undetermined.
Paying tribute to the people's conduct in the war he spoke particularly
of the women's work and again appealed for woman suffrage by federal
constitutional amendment. '
Declaring that he had no private thought or purpose in going to France
but regarded it as his highest duty. He added:
play my full part, making good what they (the American soldiers) offered
their life's blood to obtain."
It is now my duty to
Montenegro King Deposed.
LONDON.—King Nicholas, of Montenegro, has been deposed by the
Skupshtina and the Montenegro national assembly, according to a mes
sage received here from Prague today. The message says the Skupshtina
voted the deposition last Friday and declared for the union of Montenegro
with Serbia under King Peter.
I
King Nicholas' family was included in
the act of deposition.
Germany to Court Martial Former Kaiser.
AMSTERDAM.—A number of soldiers and workmen's councils in Ger
many have requested the German government to have former Emperor
William tried by German tribunal, according to a News Agency dispatch
from Berlin. The government, it is said, will submit the question to the
national assembly.
FEDERIL GRIND
JURY STILL OUT
MANY CASES BEING INVESTI
GATED—WILL PROBABLY
REPORT TOMORROW
The federal grand jnry ^ich be
gan deliberations Saturday is still in
session in the federal building and it
18 n * r wPi° rt W1 be mate
until tomorrow. There are numeroos
cases to be considered, including sev
eral m which preliminary hearings
held during the interval since
the last session of the federal court
here, and m which the defendants
were held under bond to the grand
jury This includes three organizers
of the nonpartizan league held to_ the
grand jury after preliminary hearings
at Spokane, Lewiston and Grange
rille. .
There are a number of Indians m
attendance which indicates that the
usual number of charges of selling
liquor to Indians, which generally
forms a goodly portion of the work of
the term are before the grand jury.
The petit jury has been called and
is ready to begin work as soon as the
f rand jury finishes its deliberations.
he petit jury was called for this
morning. There are a number of
cases continued from a former term
of court, and a number of civil cases
to be tried by the petit jury at this
term, which will probably last for
tVo weeks.
LOCAL TEAM SIMPLY SWAMPED
BY GREATEST TEAM ON THE
PACIFIC COAST
were
BE
IMHO 0. DID NOT
WIN FOOT Bill DIME
There is talk here of bringing action
against the sporting editor qf The
Spokesman-Review for "false pretenses."
He stated in Saturday morning's paper
that "Idaho has a good chance to win
the Pacific coast championship today."
That story should never have been
allowed to pass through the mails. Idaho
never had any more show than the snow
ball of which we have so often heard.
But Idaho was game. A team picked
up from the S. A. T. C. men here who
had had very little practice together, went
up against what is admitted by all to be
the strongest football aggregation ever
gathered together in the west, under the
greatest football coach the west has seen.
The undefeated Marines are still unde
feated and can remain so as far as Idaho
is concerned.
The score, 68 to 0, in favor of the
Marines, gives some idea of the mag
nificence of the great team "Lone Star"
Dietz, the Flathead Indian graduate and
ex-coach of Carlisle Indian school has
made from the football stars of scores
of universities and colleges who are in
the marine corps. Idaho never had a
chance to do anything but retard the
opposing team, but the Idaho boys never
faltered, never failed to ''go against it'
even though they knew there was not a
chance to win. To use the phrase so
often used in battle : "In such a victory
is glory, in such a defeat no disgrace.'
About 600 Idaho "rooters" attended the
game at Spokane Saturday and enjoyed
the trip to Spokane and a visit to the
metropolis if they did not enjoy the re
sults of the game. Idaho, and W. S. C.
play here Saturday.
Mr, Priest, of the University of
Idaho, who witnessed the game, gives
the following account of the playing:
Fighting hard from the beginning
to end the University of Idaho foot
ball team was defeated 68 to 0 by the
Marines eleven at Spokane Saturday
afternoon. Coach "Lone Star" Dietz'
"Devil Dogs" were impossible to stop.
Idaho was on the defensive practically
all the time. The Marines used wide
circling end runs and forward passes.
Every Marine runner with the ball
protected by unbreakable inter
Idaho fought continually
was
and ye tbe Marines one of their
bardeat battles. "Pat" Perrine, Idaho
^ ac j t | e _ more than once smashed
through the Marine line and stopped
^ M S arine p i ay f or a loas.
Neil Iryi gtar red in Idaho's back
j d Idaho's few gains were made
. and as a defensive back he
S g emed to be the only man that could
. through the Marine interference
* nd t the runner . Lt. Percy Han
gen * ]ayed a good game in Idaho's
t) ac kfield. Garrity showed well on
defensive. Perrine, Nolan and
g t evens were the stars of the Idaho
jj_ e
»Bing" Bangs, Steers, Gillis, Zim
merma ° the two Handleys and
Adams were the Marine stars. Ma
rine back f; € i d men shone as a back
fj e j d and individually. Adams pulled
t h e two biggest sensational fea
turea of the day He rfpped 0 ff a
gQ. yar d run to a touchdown and also
frQ ^ an Idaho kicko ff he ran the ball
ba(?k through an open field to the
30 . vard Hn *
gix hundred Idaho students attend
gd the game They cheeked their
game i y losing team to the finish,
Between halves the famous Marine
» cow hell" was stolen by Idaho stu
dents and the "cow bell was brought
back to Moscow. Marines rang the
bell every time a touchdown for the
Marines was made. At the end of
the half Idaho boys rushed over to
the Marine with the bell and grabbed
it. Students serpentined over the
field. An attempt was made by the
Marines to get back their bell and a
fight was nearly started.
During the game "retreat" came
and the flag was lowered while the
Spokane band played the Star
Spangled Banner." Marines and sol
diers stopped football hostilities and
stood at attention with the crowd of
between 3000 and 4000 people.
BACHELOR FARMER KILLED
BY HIS TEAM NEAR TROY
J. E. Pickard, undertaker of Troy,
was in town today as a witness before
the grand jury in the case of a man
arrested for operating a still near
there. Mr. Pickard tells of the death
of Carl John Franson, a bachelor
farmer, aged 63 years, by his team.
He was hauling wood when he slipped
off and fell between the horses which
ran away and one of them kicked him
in the head. It is supposed the wagon
passed over him, the wheels crushing
his ribs so .they penetrated the lungs.
He lay unconscious for seven hours,
when he regained consciousness, walk
ed home, caught his team and put
them away and then walked half a
mile to a neighbor's home,
neighbor summoned two
Franson lived 60 hours after the ac
cident. He will be buried tomorrow.
He was a native of Sweden and had
no relatives here so far as known.
He had lived seven miles from Troy
where he owned a farm, for many
years.
The
doctors.
Senators Want a Trip Too.
WASHINGTON—Senator Cummins,
of Iowa, republican, introduced today a
resolution proposing a senate committee
of four democrats and four republicans
be sent to the peace conference to keep
the senate informed on the questions
arising there.
MANY NEW INFLUENZA
CASES AT KENDRICK
KENDRICK.—Tlie influenza in Ken
drick continues to increase. There are
now about 35 cases here. Mr. Newton
of the Red Cross pharmacy and his as
sistants are down with the disease and
Dr. Paul Rothwell, Kendrick's only
physician, was taken ill with the malady
yesterday. The citizens succeeded in
having Dr. Herrington, formerly of Gif
ford, come here for a few days. He
arrived last evening and is attending to
the cases as far as possible. With the
exception of Mp. Hamilton, whose con
dition is considered dangerous, all the
patients seem to be doing nicely.
It has been planned to reopen the
schools and churches, but that step has
now been indefinitely postponed pending
an improvement in the situation.
j
KAISER BILL IS
PREPARING ALIBI
MAN WHO CLAIMED PARTNER
SHIP WITH GOD SAYS HE WAS
FOOLED INTO THE WAR
COPENHAGEN. — (By Associated
Press.)—Further revelations showing
that former Emperor William of Ger
many is seeking to escape responsibility
for bringing on the war are contained
in an article by Dr. George Wegener,
appearing in the Cologne Gazette, re
counting a conversation which the writer
had with the emperor just before he
fled. In this interview, as already told
in press dispatches, the emperor at
tempted to shift the blame for the world
conflict to the shoulders of Dr. Theobald
von Bethmann-Hollweg, former imperial
chancellor, and Gottlieb von Jagow,
former of foreign
"Against my will they sent rpe to
Norway," William is quoted as having
said.
voyage because the gravity of the situa
tion after the murder of Archduke
Francis Ferdinand was clear at first
sight. But the chancellor said to me :
Got Real News From Norway.
"'Your majesty must take this voyage
in order to maintain peace. If your ma
jesty remains here, it undoubtedly means
war and the world will lay to your charge
responsibility for this war.'
"Well, I then undertook the voyage.
During all thjs time I received no re
ports from my government concerning
current events. Strictly speaking, I only
learned from Norwegian newspapers of
what was occurring in the world and in
this way I learned of the Russian mobili
zation measures.
"But when I heard that the British
fleet had put to sea, I returned of my
own accord. They had nearly caught me.
On my orders, German ships at once re
turned to the security of Norwegian har
bors. Later it would not have been pos
sible for them to do so."
Blames Russian War Minister.
The emperor then mentioned declara
tions of General W. A. Soukhomlinoff,
Russian minister of war, during the in
vestigations which occurred afterward
which he later altered to the statement
that he had not ordered real mobilization
but only readiness for mobilization. The
emperor, however, insisted on the cor
rectness of the first declaration, accord
ing to which the czar had been induced
by the kaiser to recall his order for
mobilization. He declaied that General
Nicholas Januschkevitch, chief of the
Russian imperial genera! staff, deceived
the czar and the order was carried out
in spite of him. This mobilization, the
kaiser would have it, was the final reason
for the war.
Those Desperate Troops of Czar.
The Russian war party at the court,
the kaiser continued, had already in the
spring of 1914 compelled the czar to
make preparations for war. From that
time Siberian regiments were gradually
drawn westward. They were told that
maneuvers were the reason for these
movements and thus they marched on
to the Volga river and furthèr westward
until they reached Vilna, where they were
suddenly handed out loaded cartridges
and told that they were now going to
fight in earnest.
"In fact," said the kaiser in ending the
interview, "Russian troops were already
over our frontier before the war was
declared."
I did not wish to undertake the
His Meat
r THE BOYS HAVE
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SOME BIRO THIS
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TO SECURE WORK
EUR THE SOLDIERS
PLAN FOR EMPLOYMENT OF
MEN DISCHARGED FROM THE
ARMY ARE ANNOUNCED
BOISE.—Only representatives of
the United States employment serv
ice are authorized to deal directly
with demobilized troops in securing
work for them. This announcement
is made to the Idaho state council of
defense by Nathan A. Smythe, who
has forwarded a copy of telegraphic
instructions sent to labor directors in
this state. The state director is
authorized to establish a bureau in
connection with his main and all
branch offices for the specific pur
pose of securing employment for re
turning soldiers. Where possible
they are to be encouraged to return
to the farm to engage in crop pro
duction. The plan outlined is a uni
fication of the many plans proposed
to place soldiers in industries.
The instructions issued to the state
direcor by National Director Smythe
follow:
"Our plan of operations in connec
tion with placing representatives of
labor department in every camp under
order of Adjutant General dated No
vember 23 provides for establishment
by this service of a bureau for re
turning soldiers in every city and
large town. Soldiers being dis
charged at camp and sent home will
mostly seek employment at home
rather than from camps. The task
of finding them occupation thus be
comes community responsibility. The
function of employment service is to
concentrate co-operative local efforts
and all information as to positions
at central points; furnish means of
communication as to labor supply and
needs between communities and to in
form soldiers in camps where and how
to proceed on reaching home.
"Start at once organizing such
bureaus throughout your state, using
local offices, community labor boards
and public service reserve agents and
getting assistance from other organi
zations in places where service has
no representative. Cooperation of
mayors, local councils of defense,
labor unions, chambers of commerce,
draft board, members county farm
agents and other organizations inter
ested should be sought everywhere
and every encouragement given their
efforts; giving them representatives
in offices if wanted and share in
local management in this service,
furnishing a central clearing house
and uniform system.
"When existing employment serv
ice offices are not advantageously lo
cated try to open offices in public
buildings or other desirable placés,
securing, if possible, local contribu
tions of rent and all volunteer assist
ance available. Telegraph this office
and through respective state directors
to representatives of employment
service in. camps where men from
state have been sent the ad
your
dress of each such office in your state
as opened and name of such men in
charge. Keep central control and di
rection of all work for purposes of
clearance and record but encourage
each community to feel that the work
is being done by the community and
that facilities to this service are
given for purposes of centralization
of information and inter-community
clearances.
"Make every effore to get men
back to the farms. Extremely rapid
demobilization of army on unit basis
while industrial changes pending and
during winter months presents to
country the problem of readjustment
in its most difficult form and renders
imperative immediate and most en
ergetic action and cooperation of best
organizing ability in every communi
ty. To secure prompt action use
telegraph and long distance tele
phone. Wire receipt this telegram
and report progress twice weekly.
Charge Packers in Trust.
WASHINGTON—The federal trade
commission in supplemental reports
submitted to congress today charged
five big meat packing companies with
combination in restraint of trade and
controlling the sale of livestock and
fresh meats.
NEZ PERCE BOY SURVIVES
FALL OF NINETY FEET
Walter Scott, 14-year-old son of Mr.
and Mrs. D. M. Scott of the Russell dis
trict, is recovering from the effects of a
fall over a 90-foot bluff and is able to
go about on crutches. The accident hap
pened about a month ago. The lad was
standing at the brink of this particular
bluff on Little Canyon creek when ho
lost his footing and dropped a sheer 36
feet, landing on a sloping ledge from
which he rolled and dropped another 56
feet. His right leg and foot were badly
injured and three ribs were broken; but
that the result was not more serious is
the surprise of those who have viewed
the place of his mishap.—Nez Perce
Herald.
ST. MARK CHURCH
MOSCOW EPISCOPAL CHURCH
CONGREGATION TELEGRAPHS
TO BISHOP TUTTLE
At the conclusion of morning serv
ice yesterday, S. Mark's congregation
passed, by a standing vote, the follow
ing resolution:
"The congregation of S. Mark's
Episcopal church, Moscow, Idaho,
gathered for worship this advent
Sunday, realizing the many difficul
ties and dangers contingent upon the
meeting of the peace conference, and
the great burdens laid upon the dele
gates of the several countries and
upon the peoples and parliaments
they represent; realizing also the
unique significance of this conference
in the history of the world, do earn
estly call upon the leaders of the
church to take immediately such steps
as may expedient
the church into a solemn session of
prayer, prior to and concurrently
with the sitting of the peace confer
ence.
"And further, urg« that no effort
be neglected to obtain the co-opera
tion of all Christian bodies in this
work
"To the end that international un
derstanding and goodwill may con
tinue and increase and that the ideals
and principles of Christianity may
prevail in the deliberations of the
conference."
This resolution was telegraphed to
Bishop Tuttle, presiding head of the
Episcopal church in America; and to
Bishop Funstoa.
In introducing the resolution, Mr.
Bridge emphasized the extreme dif
ficulty and delicacy of the work of
the conference and said that the per
manence of peace to follow would de
pend entirely upon the spirit in which
it was approached; the temper and
mood of the conference would depend
entirely upon the nations back of it
and it was the urgent duty of the
Christian church to set forth those
principles of justice, of the solidarity
qf humand interests, of the brother
hood of men and nations, of inter
national goodwill and co-operation,
upon which alone a permanent peace
could be built.
The telegrams will be followed up
by letters to leaders of the church,
offering concrete suggestions as to
what the churches might do. Mr.
Bridge will be glad to have sugges
tions, written or otherwise from in
terested 1 persons, i* the next few
days.
wiVe AND MOTHER
CALLED HOME BY DEATH
Mrs. Walter Overlander died last
night at 11:20 at her home on South
Washington, of influenza, followed
by pneumonia. Mrs. Overlander had
been ill about a week.
She was 41 years of age.
leaves her husband, a carpenter of
Moscow, and five children, two
daughters and two sons, who live at
home, and Mrs. Ben Nelson of Mos
cow. The youngest child is eleven
years of age. Mr. Overlander and
family have lived in Moscow only a
few months, havirvg moved here from
Juliaetta.
She
PS»
MRS. HULDA WEBER
DIES WHILE ASLEEP
AGED PIONEER PEACEFULLY
SLEEPING WHEN SUMMONS
CAME LAST NIGHT
The people of Moscow were shocked
this morning to learn of the death of
one of our oldest residents, Mrs. Hul
da Wjeber, whose home is on S. As
bury. She passed away last night
while asleep, having not been previ
ously ill.
She was about 73 years of age.
Her husband, Jake Weber died sev
eral years ago. Mr. and Mrs. Weber
settled in the Clinton neighborhood
about thirty-five years ago and Mrs.
Weber still owned the old farm.
She leaves two sisters, Mrs. Wolfe
and Mrs. Quendet of Moscow and one
brother, T. Brown, who lives south
of Moscow. She leaves one daughter,
Mrs. Randall of Montana, who was
with her at the time of. her death
and three sons, Fred and Albert, who
live in the Clinton neighborhood, and
Henry, whose home is on the reserva
ti° n -
The time of the funeral has not
yet been arranged.
IRIS IS HONOR
WEEK IN IDAHO
«
PERIOD BETWEEN DECEMBER X
AND 9 TO BE DEVOTED TO
WAR SAVINGS STAMPS
This is "Honor Week" in Idaho. The
state, which has never failed in any call
made upon it since the war began, is far
behind in the sale of war savings stamps.
The state's quota is $8,000,000 for the
year which ends December 31. Less than
$3,000,000 worth of the stamps have been
sold. There is less than a month in
which to sell $5,000.000 worth of the
stamps in Idaho. This means that every
one must buy more stamps. They are a
good investment, are better than "money
in the bank" because they draw interest
and their purchase helps the government
and aids in keeping down taxes.
Christmas comes this month. Millions
of dollars are spent every Christmas for
gifts that are really of no value to the
recipient. It is being urged that war
savings stamps and thrift stamps be
bought for Christmas presents. This will
be giving something of real value and it
will help the government. If the people
of Idaho will spend half of the sum they
usually spend on Christmas for thrift
and war savings stamps this year, with
a little extra effort by all in taking a
few of the stamps for themselves, the
state's quota can be raised. The follow
ing letter has been sent out by Mrs.
Frank Kinyon, director of the war
speaking campaign to the chairman of
the speakers' committees of the state:
"The first week in December will be
'Honor Week' in Idaho, when we are to
bend every energy to putting Idaho over
the top in its war savings quota. V
"To accomplish this will require a sy«^
tematic campaign just as was done in th?
last Liberty loan drive.
"Please get in touch with the various
community centers in your county and
arrange for a rousing meeting in eacli
one. Send a good rousing speaker and
arrange for some special music.
"Sec that your speakers are well
equipped to make addresses that will
bring results. Probably most of them
belong to the four minute men and will
hare a copy of the enclosed bulletin from
the state W. S. S. committee. If not, see
that they get one.
"It will take hard work to complete
the state's quota of war savings stamps,
but it can be done. More depends upon
the patriotic speakers of the state than
any other factor. Let us not fail in our
endeavor. Keep before your speakers
the thought that they are not only ap
pealing for funds needed by the gov
ernment, but inculcating the habit of
thrift in the minds and lives of th«
American people, which President Wif ■
son has called 'one of the fortunate by
products of the war.'
"Please get your committee togeth«?
at once and plan your campaign.
"Very truly yours,
"MRS" FRANK KINYON,
"Director*
MOSCOW PEOPLE
SRÛW GENEROSITY
RESPOND LIBERALLY TO AP
PEAL FOR AID FOR A SORELY
AFFLICTED FAMILY
That Moscow has generous sympathy
enough to go around was evidenced in
gratifying measure by the immediate and
great response to the appeal for the
family so severely afflicted with influ
The Star-Mirror had scarcely
made its appearance on the streets on
Saturday night before offers of clothes
for children were made, and it is safe
to predict that the baby and the two
older boys will be well provided for the
rest of the winter. All of the articles
furnished will be extremely useful and
are much appreciated. The public will
be interested to know that the mother
and baby are making satisfactory prog
ress against the influenza, and that the
father, who has been at death's door for
some days, is showing a decided im
provement and gain.
One of the kindest offers made on be
this that of Mr. and
enza.
Mrs. C. D. Bell, Wto t v«£v- generously
stated that they wotil^M^
ing of the family q ffigffigH
the illness of (he
Warm slippers werlsffl
mother, but so far théj^H
of a bath robe or kimnt®
one who has an extraM
kind will be good enou|j
Associated Charities by c'
r the wash
wee during
fcfor the
trift
r of this
otify the
ng 88.
SURVEYING NEW ROAD
NEAR JULIAETTA
JULIAETTA. — County Surveyor
Harvey Smith and a crew of assist-
ants are now engaged in making a
survey for a new grade county road
leading from Juliaetta to the Fix
ridge section. There are now three
roads to that section, but the nete
grade will have all future county,
work done on it, the other roads to
be abandoned. It is hoped to find a
grade that will at no point exceed
six per cent. The length will be ap-
proximately three miles.
-
The Faculty Women's club will meet
tomorrow afternoon, December 3, at
Ridenhaugh hall. As this is their first
meeting of the year, due to the quaran
tine. it is hoped a large number will be
present.

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