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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, December 07, 1918, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1918-12-07/ed-1/seq-2/

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The DAILY STAR-MIRROR
Published every evening except Sun
day, at Moscow, Idaho.
GEO. N. LAMPHERE, Publisher.
The Official Newspaper of the City
Moscow.
Entered as second-class matter Oct.
16, 1911, at the postoffice of Moscow,
Idaho, under the Act of Congress of
March, 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
UDeliverd by carrier to any part of city
Per Month .50c
Three Months ....
Six Months .
One Year.
.^2 76
!!.'!! s.'oo;
(outside of city and on rural routes):
Per Month .
Three Months .
Six Months .
One Year .
The (Weekly) Idaho Post:
Per Year.
By Mail
. .40c
$1.16
. 4.00
2.25
.$1.50
MEMBER OF ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively
«ntitled to the use for republication
of all news-dispatches credited to it
or not otherwise credited in this paper
■nd also the local news published
therein.
^ eights of republication of
,
special dispatches herein are also re
served.
_
FRANCK ENRICHED BY WAR.
It seems strange that a country in
vaded as was Prance by an army bent
upon her destruction and which did de
stroy everything within its reach, should
, ,, , .
have actually made money out of the war,
, , , '. , ,
yet we have good authority for the state
, , „ ■ , ,
nient that the people of France never had
, ...
as much money as now and that the
... ... .
average citizen is simply Wallowing in
„ , , , , v
wealth because the war brought to them
, , , , , ,
more money then they had ever dreamed
of having
j . ,
It may seem strange, yet when one
, , . . .
comes to analyze the situation it can
... , , , , _ .
easily be understood why the French
, , , ,
people have so much money and are en
. . , , .
joying such unusual prosperity. True,
, , , , ,
France has been the invaded country and
. , , . ,. , . . .
has had to fight for its existence, but!,
, , . , , , _ , , _ .
she has not fought alone. England, Bel
T . , , , t . ■ ,
gium, Italy and the Llnited States sent
, — , ,
troops to France and kept them there.
It is estimated that there were 8,000.000
foreign soldiers on French soil during
the last few months of the fighting and
that these men had to he supported and
cared for while there meant that
sums were spent for this purpose. Eng
vast
land built great docks, warehouses and
were
store rooms and the French people
employed at higher wages than they had
been accustomed to, to do this work,
Then came the United States and spent
hundreds of millions of dollars for per
maneiit improvements .among them be
ing one of the largest docks in the world.
The money spent for this went into
pockets of the French people.
But probably the
wealth to the French
greatest source of
was the money
spent by the American and British sol
diers. The Americans were the best paid
soldiers in the war.
month and sustenance,
mated that 90 per cent of this was spent
in France. A number of very wealthy
men were in the army and it is said
that some of these spent several hundred
dollars per month, each. The Americans
are the most liberal spenders in the
world and the American soldier is no
They drew $30 per
and it is esti
exception.
Conservative authorities estimate that
for many months there were 8,000,000
foreign soldiers in France who spent an
average of $20 each per month. This
makes a grand total of $160,000,000 per
month turned loose in Farnce and most
ly spent among small shop keepers and
people of the middle or lower classes.
This is an enormous sum and millions
of French peasants have received more
money since the war began than they
had ever hoped to have during a life
1 hey, too. are spending it more
time.
freely than ever before and the result is
that money is more plentiful in France
today than it has ever been. While the
■ ill
war has brought untold hardships and
suffering to the people of France and
has cost the nation a sum which
keep it in debt for generations, it has
actually brought prosperity to the French
people who will regret to see the sol
diers of their allies return to their homes
and stop the golden flow of wealth that
has been pouring in a steadily increasing
stream into French coffers for more
than four years.
B8 ^5 IBs
HEALTH OFFICER DOES DUTY.
The Star-Mirror must commend the
work of Dr. W. A. Adair, city health
officer, for the work he has done in
handling the influenza situation. His is
certainly an unpleasant task, but he is
handling it well. Probably no one in
Moscow is in closer touch with the in
fluenza situation or understands it bet
ter than Dr. E. H. Lindley, president of
the University of Idaho, and Dr. Lind
ley said to the writer : "I think Dr.
Adair should be highly commended for
the splendid work he has done. I only
wish the people of Moscow could know
all of the facts and realize how hard his
position is and how faithfully and well
he had performed his duties. I think
Dr. Adair's work is largely responsible
for the improvement in local conditions."
There is the opinion of one who knows.
Dr. Lindley has been thrown in closer
touch with the influenza situation than
any person in Moscow, owing to his
'
as president «1 the university
here 131 Kl students were under his
care. Me knows "whereof he
1 speaks" and his commendation of Hr.
I Adair's work ought to go a long
offsetting the criticism that
(comes from people not nearly s
! informed as Or. Lindley as to what has
been done, what is being done and the
i ' "
,)j r ,. cl
way
i toward
well
conditions that have prevailed here.
I At the
school board meeting Dr.
Adaii was criticised far not closing the
: churches and the picture shows. The
; statement was made that "the school dis
1 r ' ot ' s l° s, " n 8 large sums by keeping the
t schools
closed and the teachers idle."
Closing the picture shows and the
'churches would not pay this money back
to the school district.
Dr. Adair has made careful study of
conditions. Eleven new cases have been
(reported this week and only one of these
I new patients had attended the moving
j picture show and not one had attended
|church, so the facts are that the picture
;
j
reported since both were reopened,
| Let ns all try to.help the health offi
shows and the church are not respon
sible for tile new cases that have been
leers and all physicians and every one
, , ,
else who is helping to stamp out the
disease and not harrass them and make
(their work harder and more unpleasant
M;v needless criticism.
j
j fs X() OXF RESPONSIBLE?
, " Is 11 no . " nc responsible? Is no one to
be called to account? Is there to be no
-, , c . . ,
'punishment? Surely that is neither,
,, . .. , —,
Gods justice nor mans. Ihe men re
, , , . , ,
sponsible for this outrage on the human
i , .
race must not be let off because their
, , , , ,
heads were crowned when they perpe
,
itrated the deed,
The wor ds of Lloyd George, premier
of England, uttered in a speech before
,
parliament yesterday, will ring through
. , . , , , ,
out the civilized world and will cause
. ,, . , . „ „ .
terror in at least two places in Holland,
T 1 i n ,■ „ „ ., ,
Lloyd George was discussing the terrible
, . , . . .. ,
.Loss of life, the terrible wastage to
, . , , ,
Europe caused by the world war started
,, , „ , • , , ,
by William Hohenzollern, his oldest son.
„ , TT , .
the crown prince, Bethman-Holwig. Von
T ~ . „ ,, S.. .
Jagow, Count Bernstorff, Von I irpitz
, .
' m< ° 1Crs '
Reports just published show that
10.091,834 deaths are directly traceable
to this war, this being the list of fatal
casualties among the soldiers and takes
no account of the millions of civilians
starved to death, killed by shells, ex
posure and hardship.
Yet no one claims
Von Tirpitz.
",
bringing on this worse than needless war.
responsibility for
, Jlie former kaiser, who, when his troops
rin: pin; jnoqe pauruis "Suuuii.w ajav\
bounced to the world that "this is my
j* :att * e aiK * w ' lf) ' nv > te d the
newspaper
(men of the neutral nations to come and
see liis armies start for Paris and the
fled as has Von Ludendorff, who would
not consent to stopping the war in 1916.
but said : "Go ahead and conquer and
channel ports, says be had nothing to do
with starting or managing the war.
Little Freddie, his almost imbecile son.
also pleads "not guilty."
who planned the submarine campaign
and ordered the Lusitania sunk, has
(then talk peace and let the defeated
countries pay for it."
No one is responsible. The men who
had planned it for 25 years arc entirely
guiltless. Rut an outraged world will
demand that they prove their innocence
in courts of justice and will not permit
them to sneak off to a neutral country
and hide behind legal technicalities, nor
will the world accept the proposition that
comes from Holland today to intern the
former kaiser and the crown prince oh
an island under guard of Dutch war
ships. The world demands that these
w orse than brutal murderers be brought
to trial and killed as a warning to future
kings.
SECRETARY M'ADOO APPEALS
TO THE PEOPLE OF IDAHO
BOISE, Idaho, Dec. 6.—(Special to
I The Star-Mirror.)—State headquart
ers for war savings for Idaho has
received a telegram from Secretary
of Treasury McAdoo urging and in
sisting that Idaho fulfil your whole
war savings stamp obligation and
calling attention to the necessity of
holding the war savings certificates
already purchased as long as possible
and under no circumstances to ask for
their redemption until some time next
(year. Mr. McAdoo says: "I most
earnestly urge upon you that your
organization make every possible ef
fort to the end that pledges for the
purchase of war savings stamps be
fulfilled before the close of the year.
The government's monetary require- j
ments were never greater nor more
pressing than they are today. Ex
penditures for November were great
er than in any similar period. These
expenditures growing out from the
war must be met by borrowing from
the people and their magnificent re
heretofore to the government,
makes me confident that they will not
fail to continue their support to the
end that all payments resulting from
war necessities Will be promptly met.
Much remains to be done. Our brave
troops must be maintained and paid
until their work is fully accomplished
and they are returned to their homes.
This is not a time for us to relax
our efforts and the treasury depart
ment is making plans for larger and
even more Important work during the
coming year. Please make extra ef
fort to bring this statement before
the people in vour district and to
urge the continued holding of their
war savings certificates, the fulfill
ment of their pledges and additional
purchase as their means permit."
j
sponse
*
u
I
M'
Si.
S. Mark's Church.
Sunday services: 8 a. m., holy com
munion; 9:45 a. m., Red Triangle
class in Carnegie library room; 11 a.
m., morning service; 7 p . m., study
circle. A cordial invitation extended
to all.
W. H. BRIDGE, Rector.
Methodist Episcopal Church.
9:45—Sunday school for adults
only. The quarantine still prevents
children from coming. We trust that
there will be a large attendance of
the college classes and the adult bible
classes.
11:00—Sacrament of the Lord's
Supper. All members are urged to
be present.
12:15—Class meeting, E. R. Heat
ley, leader.
6:30—Epworth League in Epworth
hall.
7:30—Preaching by the pastor.
Subject: "The Dreamer Who Founded
a Nation."
Regular prayer meeting on Thurs
day evening.
HAROLD O. PERRY, Pastor.
First Baptist Church.
At 11 o'clock Mr. Hamilton will
speak on the theme "The Beatitudes."
This perhaps is the most misunder
stood portion of the Bible. At 7:30
o'clock the sermon theme is "The
Faithless Doorkeeper."
Young people meet at 6:30.
Thursday evening mid-week prayer
meeting in the lecture room.
DEAN HAMILTON, Minister.
First Christiau Church.
Sunday school at 9:45 a. m. (save
for children); sermon 11 a. m.;
Christian Endeavor 6:30 p. m.; ser
mon 7:30 p .m. The public is cordially
invited.
Nazarene Church.
Sunday morning woi-ship, 11 o'clock.
Subject: "True Holiness, What Is
It?" Peoples' meeting, 6:30 p. m.,
leader, Mrs. Fred Samm; topic:
"Prayer—Does God Answer?"
Evening worship, 7:30 p. m., sub
ject: "Shams or Satan Transformed."
These services will all be interesting
to the seeker after the truth. Our
Wednesday evening prayer meetings
are often scenes of the old time
The adult classes will meet for
Sunday school at the usual hour.
"The Problem of Evil" is the ser
mon topi- at eleven o'clock,
evening theme is "Acquaintance With
God."
Dean J. G. Eldridge will conduct
the vesper service for the young
neople at 6:30. \ nart of the hour
is given to social fellowship,
refreshments will be served
young neonle of the community will
an attractive service.
P® wer . .°£ God as sou ' s P ra y t . hro .J a
the old-time way. You are invited
to come and worship with us.
LYMAN W. GOSS, Pastor.
The Presbyterian Church.
The
Light
The
__ ..........
find this an attractive service. All
are eordiallv invited.
Our church music under the direr
tion of Professor Bangs has bp°n
greatly improved You wi'l enjoy the
anthems at the morning and evening
services. Miss Gladys Beach is the
soloist for tomorrow night.
WAYNE S. SNODDY, Minister.
*
Royal Neighbors Elect Officers.
Unity Camp No. 2005, Royal Neigh
bors of America, met in regular ses
sion last night and elected officers
for the ensuing year. Those elected
to serve are:
Oracle, Jennie Elliott; vice oracle,
Laura Sheets; chancellor, Dr. Zona
Biggs; recorder, Ella M. Stewart; re
ceive^, Viola Carter; marshal, Tina
Sudderth; inner sentinel, Emma Eg
gan; outer sentinel, Effie Jabbora;
manager, Allie Frazee; physicians,
Dr. Adair and Dr. Leitch; musician,
Inez Tracy.
The second cup is
*tempxinB after yo
have Tried xhe
■first and you may
drink as many as
you please with
out h
u
»
i
;
3:
arm.
INSTANT
POSTUM
m
t
a
rSlST*KT POSTwlp
[I
A
«
On Monday, December 16, the Am
erican Red Cross, the most honored,
the most revered, the most deeply be
loved organization in the world, will
begin the annual roll-call of its mem
bers, and all over this peace-blessed
land, millions upon millions of loyal
and grateful American men, women
and children will proudly answer
"Here" as they advance to pay their
annual membership fee of one dollar
and have their names once more in
scribed on the list of those who are
pledged to aid and succor distressed
mankind.
On Christmas eve a year ago, 22,
000,000 American citizens had given
to the allied world a pledge of faith
more convincing than gathering
armies and ships of war. Nearly ten
millions of schctol children, the on
coming American generation, were on
the roll of honor.
Conceive, if you can, just what this
tremendous endorsement of the prin
ciples for which the Red Cross stands
—humanity and mercy—meant at
that time to a world torn by war, on
the every brink of a ghastly defeat,
facing a future that for days at a
time seemed to hold out as the result
of the conflict only unspeakable hor
rors and the depths of degredation for
all civilization.
What did membership say to the
soldiers, what did the dollar that you
paid a year ago proclaim to the ut
termost parts of the universe ? It
told that glorious body of fighting
men who at Christmas time last year
were falling by the thousands in order
to push the American flag to victory,
that there was a noble nation of true
and loyal hearts at home, solemnly
covenanted to make the same sacri
fices for truth and honor.
In the words of Henry P. Davison,
chairman of the war council of the
American Red Cross: "Through all
this tumult of death, and of glory,
the Red Cross has kept the faith. To
every war-blighted country where it
could make its way it has done as the
messenger of the American people,
healing the sick, feeding the hungry,,
clothing the naked and cheering the
hopeless. The end is not yet. The
world's measure of suffering is
greater than we can know until time
lifts the curtain which hides it.
There will be many a long day be
fore all the boys come home. The
Red Cross has still a great, a mar
vellous work of humanity to do. It
needs the weight of every American's
The Red Cross needs from you and
from each member of your family the
sanction of its mission as expressed
by the answer you will make to the
roll-call on December 16.
As Mr. Davison says: "The Red
Cross must have 100 per cent mem
bership in order that it may deliver
its message trith the voice of the
whole nation, in order that to every
American soldier who has been will
ing to offer his life for his country's
cause, wherever he may be, the Red
Cross shall stand as the ever-present
embodiment of his home and his
people.
"This is the Christmas time, the
home time, when all around the world
the home bells, clear above the noise
of the war, will ring the undying
message of good-will. There are sad
homes, and not many happy ones,
when the whole world suffers, but
there are millions of homes and mil
Bons of hearts where the Christmas
flame will burn brighter for the
thought that the path between them
and the field of battle is clear to the
Red Cross messenger, and that while
their man guards liberty's altar, the
Red Cross is guarding his.
"This roll call is a plea for your
pledge. Make it unanimous."
REV. W. H. BRIDGE'S
READING PLEASED HEARERS
A small, but enthusiastic audience
heard Rev. W. H. Bridge, rector of
St. Mark's Episcopal church read
Galsworthy's "The Fugitive" in the
St. Mark's Guild hall last night. The
drama, that of a woman out of tune
with the social life she is living so
runs away and suffers poverty and
finally death in order to keep herself
; clean for higher things, has strength
and movement that are well suited to
Mr. Bridge's powers.
The characterization of Mallise, the
artist friend and councelor of the
heroine was particularly well done by
Mr. Bridge as were the lighter comic
passages in cockney dialect.
The Misses Florence Allebaugh and
Henrietta Peasley gave musical num
bers between the acts.
Another program of two lighter
social comedies written by Suttre will
be given next Friday night. It is
hoped that a large attendance will be
present.
A. Dygert's mother. Mrs. Phoebe Dy
gert, who is almost 94 years of age, had
the misfortune to fall and hurt her leg
several days ago. She is able to walk
now onlv when assisted.
Mrs. Victor Peterson has received
word that her son Oscar, who has been
in France about a year in aviation as
sergeant major, had arrived safely in
New York last Wednesday and is feel
ing fine.
P
+ * + + + + + + + + + + + + + +
MARKETS
♦♦♦+♦++++♦♦+♦++♦
The following market quotations
are the prices paid to the producer
+
*
by the dealer and are changed daily,
thus giving the public the accurate
quotations in all classes of grain,
produce and meats.
Hay and Grain.
Wheat, Marquis, bulk.
Wheat, Bluestem No. 1, bulk,
net, delivered to warehouses 2.03%
Wheat, Bluestem No. 1, sacked
net, delivered to warehouses 2.12%
Wheat, Fortyfold, No. 1, bulk
net, delivered to warehouses 2.03%
Wheat, Fortyfold, No. 1, s'k'd
net, delivered to warehouses 2.12%
Wheat, White Club, No. 1, bulk
net, delivered to warehouses 2.02%
Wheat, White Club, No. 1, s'k'd
net, delivered to warehouses 2.11%
Wheat, Red Russian, No. 1, blk
net, delivered to warehouses 1.99%
Wheat, Red Russian, No. 1 skd
net, delivered to warehouses 2.08%
No. 1 Feed Oats, sacked, per
cwt, net, delivered to ware
houses
$2.07%
3.00
PROFESSIONAL CARDS
PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS
DR. W. A. ADAIR—-Physician, Creigh
ton Blk. Phone 85.
DR. J. N. CLARKE—Physician, New
Creighton Blk, Phone 139.
DR. C. L. GRITMAN—Physician and
surgeon, 720 So. Main. Phone 27.
DR. JOHN W. STEVENSON—Eye
Ear, Nose and Throat. Glasses
Fitted. Office of Dr. Aspray, 303
3rd Ave. Phone 177._
DR. D. F. RAE- Physician, Brown Blk.
Phone 33J,
DR. F. M. LEITCH—Physician, Com
mercial Bldg. Phone 223Y.
DR. J. J. HERRINGTON — Office
over Willis' Drug Store. Phone 346;
Phone 187R.
OSTEOPATH
DR. W. M. HATFIELD—Osteopath,
Creighton Bldg. Phone 48.
CHIROPRACTIC
DR. ZONA BIGGS—Chiropractic, Steele
Bldg. Phone 331H.
DENTISTS
DR. I. R. BOYD—Dentist, Creighton
Bldg. Phone 168R.
DR. H. J. SMITH—Dentist, Urquhart
Bldg. Phone 9.
DR. J. A. McDANIELS—Dentist, First
Nat'l Bank Bldg. Phone 229.
DR. T. B. McBRYDE—Dentist, Brown
Blk. Phone 33L.
DR. L. A. PHILIPS—Dentists, Skatta
boe Bldg. Phone 14L.

G, G. PICKETT_Lawyer,
LAWYERS
cor. First
and Main. Phone 2.
L. MORGAN—Lawyer, Urquhart
Bldg. Phone 75.
FRANK L. MOORE—Attorney-at-law,
Commercial Blk, Phone 81.
A. H. OVERSMITH
Atttorney-at
Law, Urquhart Bldg. Phone 208.
ÖRLAND & LEE —- Attorneys-at-Law,
First Natl. Bank Bldg. Phones Or
land 104. Lee 104L.
H. R. SMITH—Attorney-at-Law, First
Natl. Bank Bldg,, Third St, Entrance.
Phone 43Y.
JOHN NISBET—Attorney-at-Law, 1st
Natl. Bank Bldg. Phoné 131J.
J. H. FORNEY — Attorney-at-Law,
Commercial Blk, Phone 78.
ROY O. JOHNSON—Attorney-at-Law,
Commercial Blk. Phone. 81.
SUPPTNGER & OGDEN — Attorneys
at-Law, New Creighton Blk. Phone,
G W. Suppinger 83 ; Scott, Ogden
83H.
FLORISTS
SCOTT BROS — Proprietors, North
Main. Phone 289.
VETERINARY
DR. E. T. BAKER—Assistant State
Veterinarian. Residence Sixth and
Wa shin gton, phone 243. _
DR. J. D. ADAMS — Veterinary, 220
South Ashury. Phone 1SY.
AUCTIONEER
CHAS. F. WALKS—Auctioneer, Urqu
hart Blgd. Phone 278.
EXPERT PIANO TUNING
Phone 189=W
No. 1 Timothy Hay
White Beans, per pound.
Produce.
$34.00
.07 %
60c
Eggs, per doz .
Butte., creamery, per lb.
Butter, ranch, per lb
Potatoes, per■ cwt.
Young chickens, per lb...
65c
55c
75c
[email protected]
Hogs, live wt., light, per lb [email protected]%
Hogs, live wt., heavy, per lb
Old roosters, per lb.
14c
[email protected]
Hogs, dressed, heavy, per lb [email protected]
Hogs, dressed, light, per lb. [email protected]
. . [email protected]
[email protected]
Veal, live wt., per lb
Veal, dressed, per lb. .
Spring lambs, per lb.
Mutton, per lb.
9c
[email protected]
CLASSIFIED ADS
HELP WANTED—Female
WANTED—A GIRL FOR GENERAL
housework. Phone 9119.
56tf
WANTED—A MIDDLE AGED LADY
to keep house on farm. Rt. 4, Box 16.
56-7!
FOR RENT—Rooms
APARTMENTS FOR RENT AT
the Idaho Hotel; steam heat. Phone
295.
49tf
4*
317%
55-6C
FOR RENT—ONE HOUSEKEEPIN
suite; also sleeping rooms.
South Jefferson. Call 105W
1
FOR RENT—LIGHT HOUSEKEEP
ing rooms. 310 So. Lilly. Phone 338.
47tf
FOR RENT —A ROOM WITH OR
without sleeping porch ; hot and cold
'•ater : modern conveniences ; price rea
< nahe.
■ quhart.
425 East Third St.
Mrs. D.
13tf
FOR RENT—FURNISHED APART
ments and furnished rooms at
Eggan's apartments. Phone 206H.
231-tf
FOR TRADE
IMPROVED TWO
FOR TRADE
acres for small car. Phone 290R. 31tf
WANTED—TO EXCHANGE Oh®
two bottom 14-inch gang plow for
three bdttom. Phone 9251. J. H. Dye.
289-tf
FOR RENT—Houses
FOR RENT—A 7-ROOM MODERN
55-66
house, close in. C. H. Patton.
FOR RENT—FIVE ROOM HOUSE
Corner Main and Morton. Phone
1Y. 44-tf
FOR RENT—AN 8-ROOM MODERN
house near the domitory. Phone 170J.
Mrs. John Shannon.
3ti
FOR RENT—2-ACRE TRACT WITH '
5-room house, cheap. Phone 290R.
32tf
WANTED—Miscellaneous
WANTED—GOOD LIVE DEALER
to sell the best truck on the market
Can make deliveries 1 to 5 tons. Write
Rochester Motor Co., 1012 Sprague
235-tf
Ave., Spokane, Wash.
WANTED TO RENT—AN OFFICE
desk. Telephone 362.
291-tf
FOR SALE—Real Estate
FOR SALE OR TRADE—205 ACRES
of timber land 8 miles frpm MctscoW ;
trade for Moscqw -prope'rtv preferred.
Cali "OIL, MdA'ow.
58tf
FOR SALE—A 5-ROOM MODERN
residence; good cellar and garage.
Phone 263H. Fred Stone.
16-tf
FOR SALE—8-ROOM MODERN
residence ; choice location, corner lot,
garage, etc. Phone 267Y. Sam Silvey.
255-tf.
FOR SALE —HOUSE AND LOT, r ,
corner First and Polk Sts. Inquire *
244tf
Mrs. Wm. Arnett.
FOR SALE — 80 ACRES THREE ,
miles east of Moscow ; house and barn. .
Write E. R. Fuller, Lewiston, Idaho, or
see N. G, Gilbertson, adjoining farm, 6tf
FOR SALE—Live Stock
FOR SALE—24 HEAD SHROPSHIRE
sheep. Write A. E. Alexander. Phone
Fanner 942K5.
32tf
REGISTERED. BIG TYPE POLAND
boar of the best of breeding age —
20 months. Glen A. Morton. Phone
59-63
8991.
T HAVE A PURE BRED HOLSTEIN
bull, originating from John L. Smith's
herd.- Spokane, for service and sale at
Neely's barn; service $2.50 in advance;
see Mr. Neely at the barn. E. J. Arm
brusten
59tf
FOR SALE—Miscellaneous
FOR SALE — FANCY PACKED
Wagoner apples ; Burpee stringless *
seed beans and Blue Persian seed peas.
Phone 201L.
57-74
FOR SALE—CHOICE NO. I ALFAL
fa at $28.00"per ton in car load lots
f. o. b. Moscow. Mark P. Miller Co.
57tf
JOLINE - KNIGHT 7-PASSENGER
tonring car, in good condition, for sale
r trade. Moscow Auto & Supply Co.
283tf
SELDEN TRUCKS SOLD ON DE
ferred payment plan. Write Rochester » .
Motor Co.. 1012 Sprague Ave., Spo
kane. Wash.
235-tf
MISCELLANEOUS
POTATOES—WE ARE ALWAYS IN ,
the market ; car-lot quantities ; we pay
cash price. Garfield Fruit & Produce
Co., Garfield, Wash.
58(f

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