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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, December 07, 1918, Image 3

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1918-12-07/ed-1/seq-3/

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Weather.—Idaho.—Tonight and Sun
day, partly cloudy, occasionally threaten
ing. Cooler in the southeast tonight.
Miss Gail Taggert of Coeur d'Alene
is in Moscow to see the game.
Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Gregory of Joel
are in Moscow today.
Joseph Stalen suffered a paralytic
stroke which affected his left side only.
working at the Idaho hotel
when the affliction occured. HJe is
gradually recovering from the stroke.
Postoffice Inspector Fullinwider left
Moscow today.
Royal Garrison arrived yesterday from
Lewiston.
Official notice is hereby given of the
annual meeting of the Norwegian
church, Tuesday, December 10, at 10
o'clock.
All members of the I. O. O. F. will
meet at the hall tomorrow at 1:30 to
attend the funeral of Carl Gustafson.
John Jacksha, Sr., returned today from
Spokane. He is improving in health.
Mrs. George Stewart has received
word that her daughter, Mrs. Fred
Theriault, would leave Anchorage.
, Alaska, tomorrow with the body of her
Émsband, who died of influenza, and
would arrive in Seattle December IS.
Oatmeal Blend has no rival as a break
fast food. It is manufactured in-Mos
Ask your grocer for it.
M«s. Cloyd Clark has had as a guest
for the past week her mother, Mrs. Alt
man, of Grangeville.
Mrs. W. M. Shaw of Cornwall was
in Moscow shopping today.
Miss Agnes Peterson left today for her
school work near Orofino.
Mrs. Richard Noftsger and Mrs. C.
Richardson left on the noon train for
He was vv
57tf
cow.
Orofino.
Mrs. T. J. Keane was hostess yester
day afternoon at a club meeting of N. B.
B. O. O. The afternoon was spent at
needlework and daity refreshments were
served.
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Town entertain
ed as dinner guests last evening Elmer
Paulson and family, the occasion being
Mr. Town's birthday.
E. Haligus, who has been visiting his
cousin, A. Dygert, left for his home this
morning at Fedora, South Dakota.
L. J. Fogle, who has been at the offi
cers' training school. Camp Pike, Ark.,
has been mustered out and arrived home
today.
Miss Zoe Harris, who works at the
telephone, is sick with influenza.
Mrs. L. A. Ruehle of Greer, ar
rived this morning to visit her hus
band of the S. A. T. C.
C. B. Gray left this morning for
his home at Claresholm, Alberta.
Mr. and Mrs. Eli Hopkins and little
daughter, Mary Ann, left for their
home at Kent, Wash. Mr. Hopkins
has gone through a seige of influenza
but is now convalescent.
Mrs. Cal Shonp returned today
from Juliaetta
Mrs. Mary Moore was a passenger
this morning to Spokane.
Mrs. Harry Rawson went to Farm
ington yesterday to take care of her
daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs.
Otis D. Bradley, who are very ill with
influenza.
James Babb, of Lewiston, arrived
last evening to visit at a fraternity
and to witness the ball game today.
Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Hansen and
daughter of Grangeville are in Mos
Mr. Hansen served on the trial
cow.
jury.
Don't forget the musical entertain
ment at the university auditorium to
One of the best musical com
night,
panies on the- road will give a fins
entertainment there tonight,.J
Music lovers cannot afford to miss
the concert at the university audi
torium tonight. The program will be
well worth hearing.
If you miss the musical entertain
ment at the university auditorium to
night you will miss one df the finest
programs ever rendered in Moscow.

Dim cm
GIVE MUCH HI
RAKE STUBBLE OF CANADIAN
WHEAT FIELDS AND GET
GOOD WAGES FOR WORK
REGINA, Sask.—Four pretty vil
lage girls have taught the farmers
of the great wheat belt of western
Canada a lesson in thrift. They have
shown what a vast amount of grain
is lost by modern harvesting methods
and how it can be saved by a little
extra labor. From stubble fields
abandoned by their owners and await
ing the plow, these girls gleaned with
rakes enough wheat to sell for $646.50.
Gleaning has never been customary
The farmers who, in this
'in Canada,
bonanza land, sometimes clear enough
on one wheat crop to pay for their
farms, have been content with the
twenty and thirty bushels to the acre
obtained by harvesting machinery.
Two girls living at Stony Beach
asked a farmer for permission to go
over his stubble field with rakes. Cer
tainly, said the farmer and all they
gleaned they could have. The» girls
set to work next day at sun-up and
kept at it until twilight. The farmer
mildlv interested as he watched
was
them; they made a pretty picture, re
calling Ruth of old gleaning in the
fields of Boaz. He was surprised
when at the end of four days, he saw
a big wheat stack standing in his
stubble field. When the girls threshed
their gleanings, they sold the wheat
for $315.
Two other girls of Bounty heard of
the success of the maidens of Stony
Beach and tried a similar experiment.
They gleaned 150 bushels of wheat
from 160 acres of abandoned stubble
fields and sold the grain for $331.50.
Latah County Record.
Wednesday, December 4, 1918.
Patent— U. S. to Ole S. Frisk, lots 1-2, J
secs. 6, 39, 3 W., 80.56 acres
Rel.—Vermont Loan & Trust Com
pany to Ole S. Frink, r-ni 8-26-92.
R. M.— W. J. Hunter to P. C. Oleson,
$500; commencing at point 100 feet west
t corner of block "C," Park
of south
Addition to Moscow: N 125 feet, W 84
feet, S 125 feet. E 54 feet to beginning.
C. M.—A. J. Darr to.Lena Kesel. $800;
69.815 acres of grain in '0-39-5 W.
C. M.—A. R. Standley to Rutterficld
Klder Imp. Co., $296.70; crop on W 1-2
NW 1-4 22; K 1-2 NE 1-4 21. SE 1-4
SE 1-4 16-38-4 W and undivided two
thirds interest on crop, 40 acres in 29
33-4.
W. D.—Noah R. Clem to Ray Carter,
$200; W 23 and 2-3 foot of lot 2-4, Lieu
alien's Fourth Addition to Moscow.
ft
INDUSTRIAL NEWS
IN STATE OF IDAHO
POTATO CROP RECORD BREAKER
THIS YEAR—BOISE TO HAVE
PACKING PLANT
The institute for teachers of Camas
county will be held in Fairfield De
cember 19, 20, and 21.
Peter McKinney has sold a herd of
Jambs, about 1800 in number, to W.
D. Oliver of Dillon.
Bernard Easthman of New Ply
mouth is pulling his 136-acre orchard
and having it plowed preparatory to
putting in fall wheat.
The road running north and south
past the Binford farm at Gleenleaf
has been graded for two miles south
of the car line, making it a splendid
highway.
Superintendent of Schools R. C.
Egbers has announced that the joint
teachers' institute for Benewah, Bon
ner, Boundary, Kootenai and Sho
shone counties will not be held prior
to September, 1919.
Law has broken his record
yield of red clover seed in the
neighborhood of Greenleaf, making
2315 pounds on a little more than two
and a half acrès. It brought $816,
making $320 an acre.
Crushed rock roads are planned for
Caldwell by the city council. The
present plans are to begin by laying
a mile of road in the city with
crushed rock, costing about $8000, fol
lowing city administrations to con
tinue the work.
The formal opening of the mam
moth milk condensery of # the Carna
tion Milk company, which began op
eration in Nampa some two months
ago, has been set for December 16.
The plant was installed in Nampa at
approximate cost of $250,000.
Manager D. W. Cole of the Boise
irrigation project has just issued a
statement in which he says that the
United States reclamation service will
definitely postpone delivery of irriga
tion water to 2000 acres of land in
the Arena division of the Boise pro
Je< The Lapwai highway district has
begun the work on a new grade from
the Lapwai valley to the intersection
of the Lapwai-Spalding road. The
survey was made by County Engineer
Burns and the road will be built on a
7 per cent grade. This will do away
with Soldier canyon grade, which is
considered dangerous.
The Lincoln County Hay Growers'
association was formed recently at
Shoshone, with Wilders Veazie
msnsg'Gr. Mr. VgszTg will devote his
time to the marketing of hay, and
already has orders for a large num
ber of cars. The price to the grower
will be $20 per ton f. o. b. Jerome,
the grading to be made at Jerome by
a state grader.
Arrangements have been made with
the directors of the Northwest Live
Stock association by the Northwest ;
Shorthorn Breeders' association to
bave a sale Ht Lewiston at the live
slock grounds December 18. Joe
Turner of Meyers Falls, Wash., will
be sales manager. The Northwest
Hereford Breeders' association will
also hold a sale at Lewiston December
18, with L. R. McCall of Portland,
Ore., acting as sales manager.
The Idaho Citizens' Grazing associ
ation was organized recently at Boise
for operating on lands in eastern
Idaho now being held by the Soda
Springs Grazing association. Ap
proximately 90,000 acres will be bid
for by the new association, and the
remainder of the 117.000 acres now
held by the Soda Springs association ,
for agricultural pur
on
an
as
poses to farmers living near it.
Boise will start her post-war
tivities with the erection of a huge
packing plant by a company capit
alized for $1,000,000, which will be
commenced early in the year. The
plant has been made possible at this
time by the consolidation of the in
terests of Herbert Lemp and the
Idaho Packing company, the Davis
Meat company and the Da y is estate
interests and the Boise Valley Pack"
ins' company, with the interests of
Ernest A. Evans, together with con
siderahle outside capital.
One hundred and two potatoes Irom
one hill is the record of J. E. Ham
mond of Acequia. Of this number
six were large ones, averaging two
pounds each, while a large snare of
the remainder were of marketable
size few of them being smaller than
hen's egg. The „ potatoes were
grown on moderately sandv soil. This
has been a snlendid year for potatoes
in most parts of the state. Digging
is well along and labor difficulties
have been fairly well handled in most
districts. , , .
Since southern Idaho has gone to
the front as a potato country, and
as notato growing has been confined
to the irrigated districts, the problem
of storage has had to be met. Last
year southern Idaho farmers sustain
ed heavy losses because of the lack
of storage and their inability to se
transportation when needed.
that experience the
ac
cure
farmers of the Minidoka project got
together this year and built storage
cellars to take care of their surplus
stocks. At Hupe" the farm^s snh
<.„,.;v.od very readilv to the nlan. in
dividual shares averaging about SI00.
Sufficient funds were secured to build
cellars, each 128x32 feet, msid»
At Aceonia a ceFar was
h
two
measure. , on 00
Hiilt with an inside area of 80x32
feet, and a capacity of 6800 bushels,
or 3400 sacks. The total cost of the
Asceouia sellar, comulete. after wer
ter electric light, was $3404.68.
ing
TWO THIRDS FUIE
FOR S. 1.1. C. MEN
MEMBERS OF S. A. T. C. WILL
BE ALLOWED RATES TO
GO HOME
The discharged S. A. T. C. men will
be given reduced rates from Moscow to
their homes by the railroads. A tele
gram from the War Department states
that the U. S. Railroad Administration
will sell to soldiers tickets at two-thirds
regular rate from point of discharge to
point of enlistment.
The telegram follows :
"Hd. San Francisco, Calif.,
"10 a. m. Nov. 21.
■'Commanding Officer, S. A. T. C,
"U. of I., Moscow, Idaho.
Following telegram from the War
Department, dated November 21st, re
peated for necessary action :
"You are advised that U. S. Railroad
Administration will sell discharged sol
diers tickets from point of discharge to
point of induction or enlistment as noted
on discharge certificate at two-thirds
regular rate authorized for travel in day
coach. If soldiers travel in Pullman or
Tourist sleeping car, they will be re
quired to pay regular purchase applying
to commercial travel via one-sixth of
.
Tourist sleepers and in addition the rog
ular Pullman, Standard or Tourist car
ra ^ es as case mav be. Sale of tickets at
regular fare in Pullman standard cars
and otie-twelftli of regular charge in
reduced rates will he restricted to ticket
m j]; tal -y instruction under the regulations
from point of discharge to point of en
listment or induction, as shown in dis
charge certificate and receipt will be re
quired from each man who purchases
reduced rate ticket. Such ticket will be
sold only at place of discharge and only
upon date of discharge. Some slight de
lay may occur in making arrangements,
and men who must travel considerable
distance to reach their homes should not
he discharged prior to local railway
officials being informed by the U. S.
Railroad Administration of the reduc
tion on rates. You will thoroughly in
form all enlisted men under your com
mand of the above.
'HARRIS."
w
R, 0. T. G. WILL BE
PLANS ARE BEING MADE NOW
BY MILITARY DEPARTMENT
TO CONTINUE R. O. T. C.
Plans for active continuation of the
Reserve Officers' Training Corps are
under way, following authorization by
the committee on education and special
training, announces Captain Felkcr.
After order for demobilization, the
following telegram was received :
one letter of August IS, 1918, iu which
"In
it was proposed that institutions having
Reserve Officers' Training Corps should
fo*r the period of the war conduct their
of the S. A. T. C, it was stated that such
a course of action would in no way
prejudice (he right of any institution
having a unit of R. O. T. C.. to resume
its R. O. T. C. after the war, or the right
of any institution having a R. O. T. C.
application now pending to have a unit
established after the war.''
Courses Being Arranged Now.
Contracts for Junior and Senior men
for continuation of R. O. T. C. work
Captain Felker
are now being signed,
wishes as many men as possible to con
tinue, and would like to sec upper class
mmammm * »«nil
r
t
Toadd. enjoymentt
1 . . to breakfast
or lunch
Grape-Nuts
A cereal blend oT whea-fc
£, barley—ready-cooked
A dish -that basfes like
luxury but costs only a
trifle a serving.
ii
Needs No Sugar
à.
men at once, whether they have d<
their course or not.—Argonaut.
ided
r
TAKE THREE MEN
TO M'NEIL'S ISLAND
(Continued from page 1)
number of other cases that were not
called before this grand jury. Judge
McClcar and his assistant. Mr. Snead,
went to Coeur d'Alene where they will
investigate a number of cases that are
awaiting trial there. Judge Dietrich
will go to Coeur d'Alene Monday and a
short term of court may be held there
next week.
Mark Howe left this afternoon at
12:22 for Nez Perce, taking Farrar and
McKinsey, who were given three and
eight months, respectively, in the Nez
Perce county jail for taking whisky on
an Indian reservation.
ft
Latah County Records.
Dec. 6.—Rel.—Herbert A. Hover to
Emil A. Hendrickson, R-m 7-8-18.
Writ— B. L. Eargle vs. High Grade
Mica Corporation and C. N. Cooly,
$1507.5(i; NE1-4NW1-4 27-41-2 W.
W. D.—Harry Knox, widower, to
Arthur G. Burch, $1; 10 A. beg. at
SW cor. of NWSW1-4 30-42-4.
W T . D.—Same to same, $1; und. 1-4
int. in strip of land 16 ft wide run
ning along entire W line of W1-2SE
1-4 30-42-4.
R. M.—Arthur G. Burch to Pot
latch State Bank, $600; 10 A. beg.
SW cor. of NW1-4SE1-4 30-42-4.
Rel.— G. M. Loomis to W. J. Hun
ter, R-m 12-4-11.
W. D.—C. H. Bratton to John
Peasley, $1; lot 14 "C" Lieuallen's
Second Add., Moscow.
Patent.— U. S. to Carl John Frans
son, NW1-4 24-40-3.
Decree.—In the matter of the es
täte of Pauline Moerder; to Pauline
Moerder Robbins, John J. Moerder;
Amanda M. Kocher and Roy R.
Moerder, und. 1-4 int. each in 5 A.i
in SW cor Sl-2 Nl-2 SW1-4 3-39-5.
HOW TO REALIZE MOST MON
EY FROM YOUR LIVESTOCK
FIRST—Select the nearest market that pays top prices for
your stock.
SECOND—Consign your shipment to the commission firm that
gives you best service.
The Spokane Union Stockyards, with its reputation for the high
est prices in the Northwest, answers the first requirement. That
our firm handles more stock than all our competitors combined in
dicates what shippers think of our service.
We can fill your feeder and stocker orders.
P. W. Murphy Commission Co.
UNION STOCKYARDS
SPOKANE
WASHINGTON
■ ii|~ |ifr.|*tr | i|riifr(if î T ll t Tii|'* | i*fr' iif- Hi'*~ iifr ii[r'i»fri*fr , HfT
Ui
licj
II
Make Next Washday Easy
Yes—Get .he biggest washing out and on the line before 10 o'clock.
No laundiess required. Push a button and the THOR will do the
work. Ng wages to pay anyone. No meals to serve. What a dif
ference between this and the old wasteful way of wearing out the
clothes on a washboard and rubbing and wringing most of the day!
Electric
Washing Machine
m
m
m
if
does a good sized washing in an houi. Costs only 2c an hour for electricity.
Positively the \nost economical way to wush. The THOR actually pays for
itself as it goes along. It saves more than it costs. Over 130,000 women have
already proved that in their homes. Come and we will prove it also. We will
show you how to get better washing done for leas than it costs you now.
if
if
m
$5.00 BRINGS THE THOR TO YOUR HOME
Hr
Then $5.00 a month until paid for, and it is yours. Sold on our
guarantee that it will do all we claim or yonr money back.
Come this week- come before next washday. Let us show you how it
saves money and drudgery and gives a woman a day of leisure.
m
nr
Qjî
Washington Water P
Co.
ower
intenl
•fïï
Sanitary
Plumbing
Deficient plumbing Is never
sanitary, and Is dear at any
price.
Your health or even your life
may depend on the care
given to the laying of a drain
pipe.
Guard Your
health
We GUARANTEE every piece
of plumbing we do to be
PERFECT before we quit the
Job.
Play safe—let ub do your
plumbing RIGHT.
I
Wittcr
Fisher
Company
Phone 320
Read The Daily Star-Mirror "Want
Ads."
CUT THIS OUT
and send it with 60c and receive by
return mail Regular Dollar Size
package of our Famous Egyptian
Beauty Cream.
CREMONILE
A Beauty Builder of Highest Or
der. You will be more than de
lighted with the result.
W. S. Churchill Chemical Co.
Beaumont Texas
YOUR
MONEY
Draws interest when
deposited in this bank.
It earns nothing when
carried around in your
pocket.
FIRST TRUST
k SAVINGS BANK
Thompson Insurance Agency
Fire Insurance, Automobile and
Plate Glass Insurance, Fidelity and
Casualty Bonds
J. G. Vennigerholz, Prop.
Moscow, Idaho.
FOR FIRST CLASS, SHOE
REPAIRING
go to
J. N. FRIEDMAN
HARNESS SHOP
FINEST LINE OF HIGH GRADE
WOOLENS. YOUR INSPECTION
SOLICITED
O- H. SCHWARZ. Tailor.
LATAH COUNTY
TITLE & TRUST COMPANY
Abstracts of Title Conveyancing
Mortgage Loans
Monuments
THE MOSCOW MARBLE
WORKS
George H. Moody, Proprietor
Has the finest line of Monuments
and all Kinds of Marble Work to
be found in the Inland Empire
PRICES REASONABLE
See Our Work Before Ordering
Victrolas and
Victor Records
Sherfey's Book Store
Moscow, Idaho
If It's New We Are Sufe the
First to Have If
*
V
Hotel Moscow
+
*
4*
*
TOM WRIGHT, Prop.
v
*
*
Thoroughly Modern II
FIRST CLASS GRILL II
*1* AUTO BUS AT ALL TRAINS II
A
*
v
+
You will find you savfe more
and live better if you trade at
the
THIRD STREET
MARKET
CHICKENS, GEESE, DUCKS
AND HIDES WANTED |
L. M. KITLEY
PHONE 248'
\

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