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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, December 09, 1918, Image 3

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1918-12-09/ed-1/seq-3/

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Ifou're mine ,
body and soul !
See ihe Great
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1 oys, hooks, dolls. Brackert s. 61-66
Mrs. M. L. Smitht of Colton was Î
;
. . „I
west of Moscow, was in Moscow Sat
urday shopping. ,
Mrs. J. A. Adams and daughter ;
left this morning for their home at ;
Ritzville, Wash.,, after visiting two ;
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NAUMOVA
TOYS ?/fATE
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\ St i'fen Cl.>- sus^produt rion
that Io* • se;, the tloodÿiHfî x
nr passion ami revenue
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THE KENWORTHY
TONIGHT and TUESDAY
Weather—Idaho—Tonight and Tues
day. probably fair. Colder tonight.
shopping in Moscow Saturday.
Mrs. Thomas Halpin, Jr., who lives
weeks with Mrs. N. Peterson.
Mr. and Mrs. B. C. Coffey had
guests Sunday, Mr. and Mrs. J.
White of Colfax and Mr. and Mrs.
G W Oliver 6f Pullman
Miss Nellie Kleiber left for Coeur
d'Alene Sunday.
... __ _r ,
Miss Mae Patterson was a pas
senger to Spokane yesterday.
Gifts. china and. glass. . . Bracken's.
61-66
Clyde Marsh left Sunday for Wal
lace to spend a week with his brother,
Harry.
Miss Margaretta Costello has gone
to Sandnoint to visit with her mother
until school opens.
Oatmeal Blend has no rival as a break
fast food. It is. manufactured in Mos
cow. Ask your grocer for it.
Miss Winifred Edmondson arrived
this afternoon from Grangcvillc, where
she is teaching, the schools being closed.
Emery Clark of Pullman is in Moscow
. today. ■ Mr. Clark was at one time em
ployed in the First National bank in
Moscow.
S7tf
Benjamin Hegstadt left yesterday for
Bremerton,. where he is stationed in the
navy.
Mrs. Emiel Gerber and daughter, of
Viola, are in Moscow shopping today.
Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Lieth, who live
east of Moscow, are in town today.
A. A. Wesemaii of Viola is a Moscow
visitor.
Harry Edgett returned Saturday from
Camp Funston, Kansas. He is mustered
out of the service, but will remain in
"Moscow only a few days, as he leaves
at once for Spokane where he has a
position.
Dr. Wiik returned Saturday' evening
from Camp Funston, Kansas, where he
has been a captain in the service about
a year. He is not yet mustered out, hut
expects to receive his discharge panérs
any day. He motored to Spokane Sun
day.
*
Mr. and Mrs. S. R .Lee, who have
been visiting Mr. and Mrs. Rasmus Leo.
returned to Lewiston today, where they
now make their home.
Joe Blalock. Jr., of Cornwall, returned
today from Camp Lewis where he has
been stationed for seven months. Joe
says, about half of the boys are now
musfered out of Camp Lewis, but the
remaining ones will have to stay until
the division returns from France.
Mrs. Edna Gilmore, who has been
visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. L.
Rambo, returned today to her home in
Lewiston.
? Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Jonte entertained
at dinner Friday evening the boys who
had passed their tests as first-class hoy
scouts. The guests were George Clark,
Tom Owings and Herbert Erikson. The
boys received pins to show their stand
ing as scouts.
Attorney and Mrs. A. H. Oversmith,
Dr. Wiik and Chas. Holies went by auto
mobile to Spokane Sunday.
Edwin Rbedding, a student of the uni
versity. from Nez Perce, arrived today
from Camp Lewis. Mr. Rhedding is
mustered out of the service and expects
to take up IiL work in forestry the next
quarter.
Scout Master J. H. Jonte announces,
that there will he no meeting of the boy
scouts on account of the influenza situa
tion.
K
U/"
T. J. Springston, of Peck, is in Mos
cow on business.
Mrs. R. B. Kneppcr, county school
superintendent, is visiting schools in ihc
rural districts this week.
Mrs. T. A. Ball and children, of Pull
man, spent Sunday in Moscow the guests
of Mr. and Mrs. j. E. Nessly. The two
boys, DeWitt and Bernard, will remain,
here until Tuesday evening.
The agriculture Faculty club will
meet Tuesday with Mrs. Peterson.
All members are requested to be
present.
The influenza cases at Kendrick
number about 30, with six seriously
ill.
Dr. J. J.
Herrington of Moscow,
who is helping at Kendrick, is plan
ning on returning home Tuesday.
Mrs. L. A. Tufts of Garfield was
in Moscow Saturday evening on busi
ness.
FOR SALE.—$100,000 worth of W.
S. Stamps. Best investment on earth.
If taken this month will sell $5.00
stamps at $4.23.—Uncle Sam.
ALBERT F. DANIELS
WELL KNOWN FARMER LIVING
EIGHT MILES SOUTH OF TOWN
MARRIED RECENTLY
A pretty home wedding occurred
on Wednesday of this week when Miss
Minerva Hall, daughter of Mrs. Nellie
Hall of Genesee was united in mar
riage to Albert F. Daniels of Mos
cow, Idaho.
The ceremony w&s performed at
high noon at the bride's home by
Rev. LeVander of Atwater in the
presence of about thirty-five guests,
The vows were spoken in the living
room under an arch from which was
suspended a wedding bell and the
rooms were beautifully decorated in
pink and white banked with greens.
The bride was dressed in a very
pretty white crepe de chine gown and
carried brides roses. The bridal
couple was attended by the bride's
brother, Oliver Hall and Miss Gun-,
hild Peterson who wore a dress of
tan shade silk voile.
During the ceremony wedding
music was softly played by Mrs B. S.
Coveil of Atwater, a cousin of the.
bride. Miss Alice Jacobson of Acton
sweetly sang two solos. A splendid
wedding dinner was served after con
gratulations.
The bride is an accomplished lady
ho grew to womanhood in this com
hunity. She is one of the energetic
voung women who took a claim in
North Dakota and lived on same to
prove up. She still owns her pos
sessions near Rainy Butte,
The groom was born in Acton,
southeast of Atwater, but removed
from here when a boy, and has been
located a number of years in Idaho.
The newly married couple expect to
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j when they will reside on the groom's
near Moscow, Idaho.
The newlvweds have manv friends
i }y, bo wish for them a long and happy
I hf 5, Jtocher.
i The relatives from a distance who
I attended the wedding were: Mr. and
! Mrs. T. Peterson and Eugene Peter
! sori of Stillwater, and Mrs. John Carl
; son of Minneapolis. — Republican
j Press. Atwater, Minn,
|
MOSCOW CHAPTER

RED GROSS ELECTS
R. E. NEIDIG AGAIN ELECTED
REVIEW OF
PRESIDENT
WORK OF PAST YEAR
At a regular meeting of the executive
board of the Moscow chapter of the
American Red Cross, held last Friday
evening, officers were elected for the .en
suing year, and an informal report was
made of the work accomplished by the
organization in the past 12 months,
view of the fact that the quarantine pre
vented a general meeting of any consid
erable representation of members, no
elaborate records were read, and only
routine business was disposed of.
Although the Red Cross chapter rea
lizes fully that in taking the chairman
ship for another year, Mr. R. E. Neidig
must do so at a great personal sacrifice
of time, energy, and talents, the mem
bers felt that it would be impossible to
secure the services of any person who
cculd so splendidly discharge the duties
of the office. Under the remarkable ad
ministration of Mr. Neidig, the Moscow
chapter of the Red Cross has, even in
the most critical and exciting emergen
cies, achieved a record of which the en
tire community is justly proud. It was
the sense of the meeting that if Mr.
Neidig would consent to assume again
the arduous task involved in the chair
manship, he should be the unanimous
choice of the hoard. Fortunately for the
organization. Mr. Neidig, although most
reluctant to do so, has been prevailed
i upon to fill the-.pffice again.
Mrs. R. V. Cozier was. ejected vifcsr
chairman to succeed herself.
Iddings was chosen secretary and Mr.
W. K. Armour, treasurer.
The executive hoard is composed of
the chairman and officers, together with
the heads of the several departments.
Those heads are selected by the chair
man, and announcement of appointments
will he made at a later date.
Mrs. E. J.
CROWNED HEADS TO
GOME TO AMERICA
CROWNED HEADS TO.
THREE KINGS TO COME TO
UNITED STATES TO RETURN
PRESIDENT'S VISIT
NEW YORK. — (By Associated
Press.)—The United States govern
ment- will have as its guests in the
near future President Poincare of
France, King George of England,
King Albert of Belgium, King Victor
Emmanuel of Italy and the heads of
any other nations President Wilson
may visit during his visit to Europe.
Stephane Lauzpnne, editor of the
Paris Matin, declared today, just be
fore he sailed for France. M. Lau
zanne has been in the United States
several month on an official mission.
"It has been a diplomatic custom
from time immemorial," M. Lauzanne
said, "that the head of one govern
ment who entertains the head of an
other invariably repays the visit.''
While no official nnouncement of
plans has been made, M. Lauzanne
declared it was certain President
Poincare would come to the United
States within the next year, as his
term of office expires in 1920.
offic
No
mouncement of plans will
be made, he added, until President
Wi'son has arrived in France and vis
ited the capitals of the various na
' tions.
United States statesmen probably
will have to brush up on precedents
! and formalities for state occasions,
i Mr. Lauzanne added, as the United
States never has received the head
of a foreign ' r 'wernment with the ex
ception of King Kalakaua of the
Sandwich Islands.
]
I
URGE S. A. T. C. TO
KEEP UP INSURANCE
I
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issued by the secretary of treasury
! f or the information of soldiers about
I , . „ _ .j * _ _ __
j to m be discharged from the service:
I Treasury Department, Nov. 15,
i 1918.
,
soldiers and sailors that it is their
opportunity and their privilege to
keep up their insurance with the
United States Government after the
, ...
war has officially terminated and
even after they have returned to ci
vilian life,
CAN BE CHANGED TO ENDOW
MENT INSURANCE AGAINST
DEATH AND DISABILITY
The following statement has been
I desire to remind all America's
Millions of Men Now Insured.
More than four million officers and
men of the army and navy are now
insured with the U. S. Government
thru the Bureau of War Risk Insur
ance of the Treasury Department.
The grand total of insurance is more
than thirty-six billions of dollars.
Insurance is Renewable.
In its present form this insurance
All that is
annual, against
total permanent disability,
the provisions of the War Risk In
surance Act of the Treasury Depart
ment, every person holding this in
surance may keep it up in this form
even after he leaves the service for a
period of five years,
necessary is the regular payment of
premiums.
Moreover, the law provides that not
later than five years after the ter
mination of the war as declared by
Presidential Proclamation, the term
insurance shall be converted, without
medical examination, into such form
or forms of insurance as may be pre
scribed by regulations and as the in
sured may request.
Can Be Converted Into Ordinary
Endowment.
In accordance with the provisions
of the law, these regulations will pro
vide for the right to convert into or
dinary life, 20 payment life, endow
ment maturing at age 62 and into
other usual forms of insurance. This
insurance will continue to be govern
mental insurance. The various forms
of policies which the Bureau of War
Risk Insurance will write are now
being prepared.
The Soldier Owes Renewal to His
Under
Family.
Every person in the military or
naval service owes it to himself and
to his family to hold on to Uncle
Sam's insurance. It is the strongest,
safest, and cheapest life insurance
ever written. Just as this insurance
relieved our soldiers and sailors from
anxiety for their loved ones and pro
tected them against the hazards of
so it will continue to protect
war,
them thru the days of reconstruction
and in time of peace.
A Valuable Right is Thus Given.
The advantages of keeping this in
surance in force cannot be emphasized
too strongly. The right to continue
it is a valuable right given by the
government to our fighting men as
compensation for their services.
Opportunity May Be Lost Forever.
If- this right is lost by allowing
their insurance to lapse it can never
be regained. When Government in
surance is permitted to lapse, the
holder can not again obtain insur
ance except from private companies
at a considerable increase in cost.
Moreover, many of the men may be
come uninsurable as a result of the
war thru physical impairment and if
these allow their insurance to lapse
they lose their last opportunity for
their families to have the protection
of life insurance.
The economic value of life insur
ance to society is so well recognized
as to need no argument. The Gov
ernment now has in force upon the
lives of four millions of American
citizens who have fought its battles,
a life insurance group larger than
all others combined.
Therefore, it is manifestly of high
est importance not only to the fight
ing men and their dependents but to
all the people that the lajrgest pos
sible percentage of this insurance
shall be continued in force after its
holders shall return to civilian life,
Committee on Education and
Special Training.
R. I. REIS,
Brigadier General, General
Staff and Chairman.
'
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S, A. T. C, RECEIVES
SUPPLY WILL BE RETAINED
FOUR MONTHS FROM TIME
OF DISCHARGE
The quartermaster's office issued
overcoats on Monday to the men of
the S. A. T. C., who had not previ
ously received them, so that all of
the men are now wearing an olive
drab. The office also began to issue
the other equipment Monday after
noon, and will continue until every
man is supplied. The issue on Mon
day afternoon included everything but
the woolen uniforms.
The quartermaster's office reports
that 165 men received barracks bag,
underwear, hat and hat cord, and
cotton shirts. Three hundred over
coats were given out in the forenoon.
Woolen Uniforms to Be Issued.
The shipment of woolen uniforms
has not arrived tho they are expected
this week. The invoice for them was
received Monday. About 100 uni
forms are in but will not be issued
until the complete shipment arrives.
According to the instructions re
ceived by Captain Felker from the
War Department, each man will re
ceive a woolen uniform, overcoat,
woolen shirt, shoes and hat. The
men will be allowed to retain these
foi- four months from the time they
are discharged. At the end of four
months each man must return the
uniforms to the place designated at
the time of discharge.
Following is a copy of the tele
gram that brought the news:
Hdq. San Francisco, Calif.
10:30 Nov. 1918.
Commanding Officer, S. A. T. C.
U. of I., Moscow, Idaho.
Following telegram from the war
department dated November 21, re
peated for necessary action: "Pur
suant to Paragraph 1165 Army Regu
lations each soldier discharged hon
orably will retain all used stockings
and underclothing in his possession
at the time of discharge. He may also
retain the following outer clothing
which will be returned within four
months by mail under a franked label
which shall be furnished him for the
purpose: One pair breeches, one pair
shoes, one hat and hat cord, one
overcoat, one pair leggings, one
slicker. HARRIS."
J
BENSON.
Rejoice to Keep Clothing.
The men are rejoicing over the fact
that the four months' wear will sup
ply them with clothing during the
winter months. Many have expressed
satisfaction because they will i*ot
have to buy new overcoats this win
ter.—Argonaut.
wn

Eighty millions of men can- ♦
♦ not b« taken out of production ♦
♦ for four years without lasting ♦
♦ losses of yield. It will be years ♦
♦ before their fields recuperate, +
4» farms are restored and herds re- 4>
♦ stocked. Save food.
*
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4» 4* *♦ 4* *> 4* 4* 4» 4» 4* 4» 4* 4* v 4* 4» 4*
We Buy All Issues of Liberty Bonds
Your Banker is Our Reference
If you are compelled through force of circumstances to sell your
bonds, take them to your banker and ask him to draw a sight draft
on us with bonds attached, or. send the bonds to us yourself by reg
istered mail. We will remit on day received at the best market value.
Telephone, wire, or write for quotations on Liberty bonds or any se
curity quotations.
IRVING WHITEHOUSE COMPANY
Box 25
Davenport Hotel Bldg.
Spokane, Washington
OUR
rasa
GREAT
OF
MILLINERY
EVERY TRIMMED HAT IN THE STORE AT
IMMENSE REDUCTION
NOT A HAT RESERVED
First Choice is Best
Moscow Millinery
DOES NOVEL KNITTING WORK
■■-V -
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Uncle Sam is training 4.000 boys a
month for service in the new merchant
marine, the work being done on train
ing ships operated by the United
States shipping board. The apprentice
lads on the ships show themselves apt
their new duties, and are keen to
their leisure with some useful oc
cupation. Some of them, like the hoy
shown here, have a talent for making
drawn work and fringe on canvas for
hammocks, mats, manrope fittings,
skylight covers and the like. This is
The merchant sailor's "knitting work."
Pa
Card of Thanks.
We wish to thank our neighbors
and friends for their kind help and
sympathy at the death of our mother.
Fred Weber
Henry Weber
Albert Weber
Mrs. Stella Randall.
S ome people
I earn erf xhe
harmful e'ffoc'ts
of coffee by read
ing. Ofhers find
If curb "through
1
experience, in
eifher case if
is a good idea
fo adopf
:
INSTANT
P0STUN
A delicious
drink made :
■from -the finest
cereals, harm
less and nour
ishing. Made in
•the cup.instantr
Ty. Saves sugar
and fuel.
»,
Ad Re .? d The Daily st ar - Mirror " Want
CUT THIS OUT
and send it with 50c and receive by
return mail Regular Dollar Size
package of our Famous Egyptian
Beauty Cream.
CREMONILE
A Beauty Builder of Highest Or
der. You will be more than de
lighted with the result.
W. S. Churchill Chemical Co.
Beaumont Texas
YOUR
MONEY
Draws interest when
deposited in this bank.
It earns no4^ng when
carried around in your
pocket.
FIRST TRUST
& SAVINGS BANK
Thompson Insurance Agency
Fire Insurance, Automobile and
Plate Glass Insurance, Fidelity and
Casualty Bonds
J. G. Vennigerholz, Prop.
Moscow, Idaho.
FOR FIRST CLASS SHOE
REPAIRING
go to
HARNESS SHOP
FINEST LINE OF HIGH GRADE
WOOLENS. YOUR INSPECTION
SOLICITED
O. H. SCHWARZ. Tailor.
LATAH COUNTY
TITLE & TRUST COMPANY
Abstracts of Title Conveyancing
Mortgage Loans
Monuments
THE MOSCOW MARBU
WORKS
George H. Moody, Proprietor
Has the finest line of Monument«
and all Kinds of Marble Work to
be found in the Inland Empire
PRICES REASONABLE
See Our Work Before Ordering
Victrolas and
Victor Records
Sherfey's Book Store
Moscow, Idaho
H It's New We Are Sure the
First to Have It
T**.

A
Hotel Moscow
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TOM WRIGHT, Prop.
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* Thoroughly Modern
FIRST CLASS GRILL
AUTO BUS AT ALL TRAINS
A
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A
4 -
+
You will find you save more
and live better if you trade at
the
THIRD STREET
MARKET
CHICKENS, GEESE, DUCKS
AND HIDES WANTED j
PHONE 248'
L. M. KITLEY

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