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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, December 17, 1918, Image 2

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1918-12-17/ed-1/seq-2/

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The DAILY STAR-MIRROR
Published every evening except Sun
day, at Moscow, Idaho.
GEO. N. LAMPHERE, Publisher.
The Official Newspaper of the City of
Moscow.
Entered as second-class matter Oct.
16, 1911, at the postoffice of Moscow,
Idaho, under the Act of Congress of
March, 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Deliverd by carrier to any pari of city
Per Month .
JThree Months ....
Six Months .
One Year.
50c
.SI.50
2.75
5.00
By Mail
(outside of city and on rural routes):
**er Month .
Three Months .
Six Months .
■3ne Y ear .
40o
.$1.15
. 2.25
4.00
The (Weekly) Idaho Post:
Per Year
$1.50
MEMBER OF ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively
■entitled to the use for republication
•f all news-dispatches credited to it
•r not otherwise credited in this paper
•nd also the local news published
therein.
All rights of republication of
special dispatches herein are also re
served.
A REAL AMERICAN.
There is something typically American
in the letter of Lieutenant Otto Still
inger to his parents. Mr. and Mrs. Still-1
He had been on the
inger of Moscow.
fighting front for weeks, in the midst
of the fiercest fighting during the clos
ing days of the war. He had seen his
companions shot down at liis side. He
sights that made his heart
sick, but he continued at his work and
fired the last shot at the Huns just as
the clock struck 11 on the 11th day of
had seen
r, when the
the 11th month of the
Huns laid down their arms and quit.
During all of this fighting, when eve
ry minute might be his last, be did not
write to his parents and friends where
he was.
Tf he was to die he would die
as an American, doing his duty, and
would save his parents and friends the
worry he knew they would endure had
they known of bis peril. When he came
through alive and unwounded and the
danger was all over, he wrote his par
ents and told them where be bad been
and what he had seen.
"We may go to Germany as part of
the army of occupation." he wrote, "but
T don't care to go. We are through
and I am ready to go home. 1 have
seen enough."
Isn't that typically American? The
Huns could not win against a spirit
Eke that—a spirit that thought of-Others
first, but did its duty quietly and well
and when that duty was done, wished to
return to the peaceful pursuits and the
quiet life of peace times. It is that spir-I
it manifested by 2,O0O,(X)n of the very
flower of young American manhood
that brought the war to 'an end one
year before the English and French be
lieved it could he ended.
It is the true American spirit.
^ h R)
PLAY FAIR.
ft has repeatedly come to our atten
tion that some organizations are con
ducted on a rather peculiar plan so far as
their attitude toward the press is con
cerned.
Before a meeting the notices arc num
erous. There seems to be no end to
the quantity of free advertising that
seems desirable.
When the more or less important
meeting or other event is over, however,
nobody goes an inch out of his way
to notify the press of what was done.
The free advertising notices are not fol
lowed by compensating notices of "what
was doing," and tin's system is very un
fair.
Thc press, which gives freely of its
space to boost organization is surely
entitled to consideration after the
boosting period is deemed past and tbe
news period commences. — Kootenai
Valley Times.
fpr- fen
CUT COST OF WHEAT TRANS
PORTING.
By utilizing a logging railroad to
transport wheat the county agent of
Wallowa county, Oregon, brought about
a saving of between $8000 and $9000
to tbe farmers in one section of tin
county. Attention of the state public
service commission was called to tin
fact that the logging railroad, by han
dling (he wheat could save farmers a
considerable part of the trouble and ex
pense of a 40-mile haul to a railroad
station. Upon the recommendation of the
commission the logging railway hauled
90,000 bushels of wheat, which was mov
ed at about one-half the cost of hauling
in the usual way.—Orofino Tribune.
Ri Ik h
The people of Moscow and a 1 ) of La
tah country certainly have a "kick com
ing" on the new time card of the
Washington, Idaho & Montana railroad.
The train now leaves Palouse a short
time before the arrival of the first
train from the south, and then stops at
Potlatch two hours. If one wants to
reach Potlatch or Bovill from Moscow,
"Genesee, Kendrick. Troy or Jnliaetta
one must drive from Palouse to Pot
latch or remain in Palouse over night,
spending about 23 hours there if one
leaves here on the 10:45 train. As a
result no one from south of Palouse
visits any town on the W., I. & M. rail
If the train,
road if it can
be avoided.
spent
at Palouse for the
would spend part of the two hours
in Potlatch waiting
north-bound Northern Pa ci ft; train ji
would be a great accommodation to Un
people of a large part of Latah county.
Uobenzn'4 -rn, one time emperor of
Germany. King of Prussia and alleged
■'artner of the Almighty, had 598 military
and official uniforms and thousands of
i i - i
It was discovered some time
ago that be had hundreds of tons of
food stuffs stored awav while his sub
orshipped him blindly, had
no horses with which to plant their
crops or cultivate their lands and where
without clothes and without food, thou
clvmg of starvation. And it is
. f , * f
said that there arc vet many Germans
*
who think the late kaiser was a "super
„ , .
man and "all powerful and just.
Iba fc* BP»
W.
It
discovered
that
horses.
jeets. vvhc
\\
sands
The vast difference in the way Amer
icans and British move is shown in the
, , , , . „ _ . .
methods of election. Great Britain
, , , , . _ ...
held an election Sunday and it is an
, , . ' ,
nounced that it wdl be two weeks be
fore the votes are counted and the re
sult of the election known. In the Uni
ted States the result of a presidential
election is frequently known by mid
night following the election, and it is
infrequent that the result is in doubt
longer than 24 hours after the polls arc
closed. Just imagine, if you can, the
American people waiting two weeks to
learn the result of an election.
IB- fe
Is Senator Borah deliberately playing
the role of the bad boy of the senate
in offering a resolution to require the
senate to publish the peace treaties im
mediately and open wide the doors to all
debates upon them? Tf he is in earnest
and prepared to fight for his idea, more
power to him. A practical test of the
sincerity of the senatorial demand for
light on the 14 points for the people s
benefit would 1 >e senatorial willingne
■ss
tbe
lo abolish cscret sessions when
treatiest reach that body.—Springfield
( Mass.) Republican.
te fe is
enviable
1 1
' or
Red Cross membership. Every one
seemed to regard it as a pleasure and
, . • i *1 4 . r
an honor to join this .the greatest of
all clubs, and they were right. It was
not necessary to solicit. The citizens
were anxious to join and take mem
, , . , ... . f ... r .
bersh.ps for their entire families. I he
world is being given tbe finest Christmas ;
present it has ever received—the free j
Moscow certainly made an
record with the first day's drive
,
I
..... .. .. , . !
Congressman Mann s qualifications
will offering of the American people
to help the great cause of humanity.
mi Wi
for the speakership and .the republican
| leadership of the house in the next ses
sion have been greatly enhanced, in the
opinion of the country, by his perfectly
sane and well poised statement repud
iating any more pinpricking of the pres
ident while be is on his foreign mission.
The country is more concerned than ev
er in the continued improvement in Mr.
Mann's health.—Springfield (Mass.)
Republican.
When the soldier boys, the boys of the
glorious Ninety-First, the Idaho boys,
return the man who has bought his
share of Liberty bonds, war savings and
thrift stamps and has contributed his
share to tbe Red Cross can meet them
and shake hands with them and not feel
ashamed. He will know that while the
boys have been doing their duty on the
battle field or elsewhere, he has done
bis. But bow about the man who is a
slacker in any one of these? How
will he feel when he meets the boys?
»m He
Kaiser Bill has been ordered out of
Holland and refuses to go. He claims
no place to go. He is mistaken.
France, Belgium, England and the Uni
ted States want hint and have been de
vising means to get him. All he needs
to do is to bead west and land in Bel
to have
The Belgians or
gnnn or
French "will do the rest."
h ranee.
P» IB 5 ,
If President Wilson has not the solid;
backing of his people when he enters
the peace conference he will he the only
representative there whose nation is :
not supporting him as one man. Anicr- j
ica can Hardly afford to let this condi
tion conic to pass. We have too much
pride as Americans to permit it.
I«- rs
■;)Iy regrets the departure I
of the grand young men who have been
here as members of the S. A. T. C. and
hopes that each one will carry home
as good-an opinion of Moscow citizens as
they have of the young soldiers and we
hope they will all come again and stay
longer.
t !
r!.
-ow
The father of a large family of chil
dren certainly has a right to feel proud
when he steps up to the Red Cross
booth and takes a membership for each
member of bis family in the greatest or
ganization for good the world has ever
known.
When you are in the postoffice and re
new your membership in the Red Cross
why not buy a few more war savings
stamps as an investment? Postmaster
Morgareidge still has a large supply on
hand. Take home a few with your Red
Cross receipt.
Sonic- women are a bit disappointed
because the war ended before they could
finish knitting the mate to that sock
I elegraph.
started when we first joined out
with the allies.—New York Morn.ng
the
e ß r
The hoys are beginning to come Kack.
Tn a short time they will come in large
numbers aml 0,1 what a Teli * 11 W,M
be lo tla ' ir parents and friends when
lbe - aie at bonie once alor -
fefl fe& »
A Fort Scott. Kansas, democrat ex
l* to,, is tbe recent ,lefc ' a ' of bis > ,an - v
' sa - vll, R tbe democrats ''are all m
France " Kitber tlK ' re or 1-oldni»
A" Washmgton, D. C, where they can't
vote - Fansas Star.
r ... D . . .. . • . . t r
I he Bolsheviki are gaining control ot
■ . , , , ,
Germany and those who wondered
, , ' , , , . , ,
bow that country could lie punished
... . , ' , .. ,
; sufficiently arc answered.—New \ork
' Tribune.
Job
1
,. . , , , ,
If Mexico only knew what was good
r , , ., ' , , ,
, tor her she <1 reform and become an
... —
American winter resort. 1 here s money
i . . , , ,
in it.—Anaconda Standard.
m. te m
The fate of the German colors—the
; black has been abandoned; the white
bas been use d, but the red Is still there,
|_\ew York Sun.
j
|
V
fr.
Instead of plotting to regain his
j crown Bill ought to be glad to retain
the place where the crown used to be.
—Washington Post.
Rt Pit ^
Would it be proving too dutch if the
United States should get on
for six weeks without a president?—
New York Evening Post,
f ormer
^ c ]j eu "
veil
very
sa Ka Pa
And now the railroad men spell the
director general's name "Mc
S'?
What
amid have become of the S. A.
T. C. without the Red Cross
member.
Be
Few Escape.
There are few indeed who escape
having at least one cold during the
w * nber months, and they are fortunate
who have but one and get through
with it quickly and without any seri
ous consequences. Take Chamber
lain 's Cough Remedy and observe the
directions with each bottle, and you
are likelv to be one of the fortunate
ones . The wor th and merit of this
remedy has been fully proven. There
are many families who have always
used it for years when troubled with
a cough 0 / go , d and with the verv
best results,
-
D
Wednesday
Thursday are the
only remaining days on which you may
join the Red Cross without being tag
red In', an energetic committee. Be a
and
v( ,
1 PRINCETON PICKINGS
ms_
MANY PEOPLE HAVE VISITORS
A. E. Harris of Highwood, Mont.,
is visiting friends here. He is forest
ranger.
T. Shirley of Pullman visited at
home of his old friend, Mrs. Fred Liv
ingstone.
Miss Elsie Bingham went to Bovill
last week to help her sister who had
"flu," and her two small children.
Mrs. Sam Lachner is visiting Mrs.
Harry Luesing at Palouse.
Clarence Skim, who was operated
at Pullman for apendicitis, is improving
and will soon be at home.
Grandma Gillmore has been on the
sick list for a week.
Miss Edna Bunny tended the depot
three days last week while Mrs. Rose
Wilton helped Rov Gurnsey at Ottawa
during his sale days.
Mrs. James Rosmussen was taken
the hospital at Moscow Friday to be op-
erated on for apendicitis.
- 1« -
"There's a light in the window for
tiie." Is there also a Red Cross window
card with the right number of cfosses
on it ?
Sanitary
Plumbing
Deficient plumbing Is never
sanitary, and Is dear at any
price.
Your health or even your life
may depend on the care
given to the laying of a drain
pipe.
Guard Your
Health
We GUARANTEE every piece
of plumbing we do to be
PERFECT before we quit the
Job.
Play Mto—let os do
plumbing RIGHT.
your
Wittcr
Fisher
Company
Phone 320
+ + * + + + 4 , * + *'l , * + + , * +
'■*' MARKETS
****************
+
The following market quotations
are the prices paid to the producer
by the dealer and are changed daily,
thus giving the public the accurate
quotations in all classes of grain,
produce and meats.
Hay and Grain.
Wheat, Marquis, bulk.$2.07%
Wheat, Bluestem No. 1, bulk,
net, delivered to warehouses 2.03%
Wheat, Bluestem No. 1, sacked
net, delivered to warehouses 2.12%
Wheat, Fortyfold, No. 1, bulk
net, delivered to warehouses 2.03 %
Wheat, Fortyfold, No. 1, s'k'd
net, delivered to warehouses 2.12%
Wheat, White Club, No. 1, bulk
net, delivered to warehouses 2.02%
Wheat, White Club, No. 1, s'k'd
net, delivered to warehouses 2.11%
Wheat, Red Russian, No. 1, blk
net, delivered to warehouses 1.99%
W'heat, Red Russian, No. 1 skd
net, delivered to warehouses 2.08%
No. 1 Feed Oats, sacked, per
cwt, net, delivered to ware
houses .
No. 1 Timothy Hay....
White Beans, per pound
Produce.
3.00
$34.00
. .07%
Eggs, per doz .
Butter, creamery, per lb.
Butter, ranch, per lb ....
Potatoes, per cwt. .
Young chickens, per lb...
Hogs, live wt., light, per lb [email protected]%
Hogs, live wt., heavy, per lb
Old roosters, per lb.
Hogs, dressed, heavy, per lb [email protected]
Hogs, dressed, light, per lb. [email protected]
Veal, live wt., per lb..
Veal, dressed, per lb. . ».
Spring lambs, per lb.
Mutton, per lb..
60c
65c
55c
76c
[email protected]
14c
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
.9c
. [email protected]
PROFESSIONAL CARDS
PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS
DR. W. A. ADAIR—Physician, Creigh
ton Blk. Phone 85.
DR. J. N. CLARKE—Physician, New
Creighton Blk. Phone 139,
DR. C. L. GRITMAN—Physician and
surgeon. 720 So. Main. Phone 27.
DR. JOHN W. STEVENSON—Eye
Ear, Nose and Throat. Glasses
Fitted. Office of Dr. Aspray, 303
3rd Ave. Pho n e 177. _
DR. D. F. RAE- Physician, Brown Blk.
Phone 33J.
DR. F. M. LEITCH—Physician, Com
niereial Bldg. Phone 223Y.
DR. J. J. HERRINGTON — Office
over Willis' Drug Store. Phone 346:
Phone 187R.
OSTEOPATH
DR. W. M. HATFIELD—Osteopath,
Creighton Bldg. Phone 48.
CHIROPRACTIC
DR. ZONA BIGGS—Chiropractic. Steele
Bldg. Phone 331H.
DENTISTS
DR. I. R. BOYD—Dentist, Creighton
Bldg, Phone 168R.
DR. H. J. SMITH—Dentist, Urquhart
Bldg. Phone 9.
DR. J. A. McDANIELS—Dentist, First
Nat'l Rank Bldg. Phone 229.
DR. T. B. McBRYDE—Dentist, Brown
Blk, Phone 33L.
DR. L. A. PHILIPS—Dentists, Skatta
boe Bldg. Phone 14L.
LAWYERS
G. G. PICKETT—Lawyer, cor. First
and Main. Phone 2.
A. L. MORGAN—Lawyer, Urquhart
Bldg. Phone 75.
FRANK L. MOORE—Attorney-at-law,
Commercial Blk. Phone 81.
A. H. OVERSMITH — Atttorney-at
Law, Urquhart Bldg. Phone 208.
ORLAND & LEE — Attorneys-at-Law,
First Natl. Bank Bldg. Phones Or
land 104. Lee 104L.
H. R. SMITH—Attorney-at-Law, First
Natl. Bank Bldg., Third St. Entrance.
Phone 43 Y .
JOHN NISBET— Attorney-at-Làw, 1st
Natl. Bank Bldg. Phone 131J.
J. H. FORNEY — Attorney - at - Law,
Commercial Blk. Phone 78.
ROY O. JOHNSON—Attorney-at-Law,
Commercial Blk. Phone 81.
SUPPINGER & OGDEN — Attorneys
at-Law, New Creighton v Blk. Phone,
G. W. Suppinger 83 ; Scott, Ogden
83H.
FLORISTS
SCOTT BROS — Proprietors, North
Main. Phone 289.
VETERINARY
DR. E. T. BAKER—Assistant State
Veterinarian. Residence Sixth and
Washington, phone 243.
DR. J. D. ADAMS —Veterinary, 230
South Asbury. Phone 15Y.
AUCTIONEER
CHAS. E. WALKS—Auctioneer, Urqu
hart Blgd. Phone 278.
CREAMERY
MOSCOW CREAMERY
62 cents
paid for butter fat. Ice cream, bulk
and brick in cold storage.
HIDES AND JUNK
HIGHEST PRICES PAID FOR
hides and junk—Moscow Hide and
Junk Co., 308 W. 6th St. Will call
city or country. Phone 252.
EXPERT PIANO TUNING
Phone I89-W
Stomach Trouble.
' Before I used Chamberlain's Tab
lets I doctored a great deal for stom
ach trouble and felt nervous and tired
all the time. These tablets helped
me from the first, and inside of a
week's time I had improved in every
way," writes Mrs. L. A. Drinkard,
Jefferson Cicv, Mo.
D
FOR FIRST CLASS SHOE
REPAIRING
go to
J. N. FRIEDMAN
HARNESS SHOP
FINEST LINE OF HIGH GRADE
WOOLENS. YOUR INSPECTION
SOLICITED
O. H. SCHWARZ, Tailor.
LATAH COUNTY
TITLE & TRUST COMPANY
Abstracts of Title Conveyancing
Mortgage Loans
Victrolas and
Victor Records
Sherfey's Book Store
Moscow, Idaho
If It's New We Are Sure the
First to Have It
Monuments
THE MOSCOW MARBLE
WORKS
George H. Moody, Proprietor
Has the finest line of Monuments
and all Kinds of Marble Work to
be found in the Inland Empire
PRICES REASONABLE
See Our Work Before Ordering
YOUR
MONEY
Draws interest wImsi
deposited in this bank.
It earns nothing when
carried around in your
pocket.
FIRST TRUST
& SAVINGS BANK
i
v
Hotel Moscow ?
+
+
+
TOM WRIGHT, Prop. ' X
t
*
*
*
Thoroughly Modern
*
X
*
FIRST CLASS GRILL 4*
* AUTO BUS AT ALL TRAINS
A
You will find you save more
and live better if you trade at
the
THIRD STREET
MARKET
CHICKENS, GEESE, DUCKS
AND HIDES WANTED |
L. M. KITLEY
PHONE 248
CLASSIFIED AOS
HELP WANTED—Female
WANTED—A GIRL FOR GENERAL
housework. Phone 9119.
S6tf
WANXED—A MIDDLE AGED LADY
to keep house on farm. Rt. 4, Box 16
56-71
WANTED—A GIRL FOR GENERAL
houscwork. Call Mrs. S. L. Willis.
i
!
I FOR RENT—PARTLY FURNISHED
| Good house for small family; low
j ren t. Phone 252. 68-70
OK KENT—Roo m.
4-room house on West 6th street.
j FOR RENT —A ROOM WITH OR
I without sleeping porch; hot and cold
ater ; modern conveniences; price rea
■ nahe. 425 East Third St. Mrs. D.
quhart.
13tf
FOR RENT—FURNISHED APART
ments and furnished rooms at
Eggan's apartments.
Phone 205H.
231-tf
APARTMENTS FOR RENT AT
the Idaho Hotel; steam heat. Phone
49tf
295
I
FOR RENT—LIGHT HOUSEKEEP
310 So. Lilly. Phone 338.
mg rooms.
47tf
FOR TRADE
FOR TRADE
acres for small car. Phone 290R. 31 tf
IMPROVED TWO
FOR RENT—Houses
FOR RENT—FIVE ROOM HOUSE
Corner Main and Morton. Phone
IT. J. E. Mudgett. _, 44-tf
FOR RENT—AN 8-ROOM MODERN
house near the domitory. Phone 170J.
Mrs. John Shannon.
3tf
FOR RENT—2-ACRE TRACT WITH
5-room house, cheap. Phone 290R.
*
32tf
WANTED—Miscellaneous
WANTED—GOOD LIVE DEALER
to sell the best truck on the market
Can make deliveries 1 to 5 tons. Write
Rochester Motor Co., 1012 Sprague
Ave., Spokane, Wash,
235-tf
WANTED TO RENT—AN OFFICE
desk. Telephone 352.
291-tf
%
FOR SALE—Real Estate
A FARM IN CANADA TO TRADE
for ten acre home near Moscow.
66-68
C. H. Patten, Moscow.
FOR SALE OR TRADE—205 ACRES
of timber land 8 miles from Moscow ;
trade for Moscow property preferred.
Call 201L, Moscow.
58tf
FOR SALE—A 6-ROOM MODERN
residence; good cellar and garage.
Phone 263H. Fred Stone.
16-tf
FOR SALE—8-ROOM MODERN
residence ; choice location, corner lot,
garage, etc. Phone 267Y. Sam Silvey.
255-ti
FOR SALE
HOUSE AND LOT,
corner First and Polk Sts. Inquire
244tf
Mrs. Wm. Arnett.
FOR SALE—NOMINAL QUARTER
section of rich bottom land on Pajouse
river, 3 miles east of Princeton ; well
watered, fenced, partly cleared and with
small biuldings; railroad switch at place;
will make fine stock or hay and grain
farm. For price and terms address C. N.
Little, Moscow, Idaho.
58-60-66
FOR SALE—Live Stock
FOR SALE —7-WEEK-OLD PIGS.
Phone 9187J, Earl Hodge.
62-68
FOR SALE—24 HEAD SHROPSHIRE
sheep. Write A. E. Alexander. Phone
Fanner 942K5.
32tf
I HAVE A PURE BRED HOLSTEIN
hull, originating from Joint L. Smith's
herd, Spokane, for service and sale at
Neely's barn; service $2.50 in advance;
see Mr. Neely at the barn. E. J. Arm
brusten
S9tf
FOR SALE—Miscellaneous
FOR SALE—DINING TABLE AND
chairs, bedstead and springs, rocker,
range, library table, small stand/ re
frigerator, dresser, one rug. 407'No.
Wash. Phone 112R _68-72
FOR SALE—BLACK BROADCLOTH '
overcoat, size 37; lined throughout
with imitation mink fur; has a beau
tiful GENUIN MINK collar,
be purchased new today for less than
$125.00. Suitable for man or woman's
use in auto, for winter. Offered for
$50, as owner has no use for it.
Phone 182, Moscow.
Can not
66-68
FOR SALE—JOHNATHAN, SPITZ
enburg and Roman Bauty apples.
Call Farmers 9138._67-73
FOR SALE — FANCY PACKED
Wagener apples ; Burpee stringless
seed beans and Blue Persian seed peas.
Phone 201L.
57-74
JOLINE - KNIGHT 7-PASSENGER
touring car, in good condition, for sale
r trade. Moscow Auto & Supply Co.
283H
S ELD EN TRUCKS SOLD ON DE
ferred payment plan. Write Rochester
Motor Co.. 1012 Sprague Ave., Spo
kane. Wash
235-tf
LOST
MONEY LOST—AT FIRST TRUST
Bank or at postoffice, $20 in paper
money. Reward for any information.
Phone 9208.
67-72
MISCELLANEOUS
POTATOES—WE ARE ALWAYS IN
the market; car-lot quantities; we pay w „
cash nrice. Garfield Fruit & Produce
Co.. Garfield. Wash.
58tf
ANYONE DESIRING TO HAVE
their wood sawed, call 155Y
207H and leave your orders. Amos
67-73 .
or * .
Rogers,
"It is more blessed to give'than to
receive." Never truer of anything than
of membership in the Red Cross Give
the dollar NOW.

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