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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, December 17, 1918, Image 3

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1918-12-17/ed-1/seq-3/

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THE DA1LÏ s'lAK-MIHKUK. MOblOW IDAHO.
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1918
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FREE XMAS TREES
Buy Groceries
As customary, commencing
Tomorrow The House of Will
iamson's will be pleased to deliver
to you a Xmas Tree, providing
you live on a paved street,
not on a paved street call at ex
change desk, first floor, where
you will receive a card which will
entitle you to a tree.
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This week, stock up for the en
tire year, save 25 to 40 per cent.
Our splendid stock now being of
fered for less than wholesale—
buy ahead.
If
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7S NOW FREE TO SELL IN BULK
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WILLIAMSON'S.
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Any department, departments or the entire remaining stock. Was for that matter free to do above any time during the past two months, but
we wanted you to get a good chance and promised you we would not till after December 15th. Do not be surprised if you come to the store any day
from now on and find departments entirely gone. Such a thing can happen and may. But then ag ain it may not happen, but the entire stock is now
doomed for a speedy, quick turn over. Are you thoroughly covered for all your wants for next spring and fall? If you are now, buy now and save
more than half. Liberty Bonds taken at full face value, unlimited credit to property owners or those whose account with this store has always been
balanced regularly. But there will be no new accounts opened or any extension of credit to any one whose account is over 30 days due.
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The Entire Store Given Over to the Showing of Xmas Goods
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The selling is spirited. The values offered not in keeping with the market conditions—what the goods are worth—what we could get. But
rather a speedy clean up on everything. Those who live in town should trade mornings thus insur ing better service, less crowding, better all round.
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WILLIAMSON'S
The Store That is Stepping Out But Not Down.
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CigTHe^s
Idaho—Tonight and Wed-;
snow in
Weather :
nesday, fair, except probably
the southeast.
... •
W armer tonight m the
Miss Lillian Goodwin, daughter of,
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Goodwin, is very!
seriously ill at their home on Orchard
avenue, with pneumonia following in
fluenza.
•southeast.
Airs. R. C. Parmenter of Joel is in
Homer Canfield of Harvard arrived on
Moscow today.
the Inland today.
Airs. H. B. McCone leaves today for
Casper, Wyoming, to make a visit.
R. F. Bailey was a passenger to
Kendrick today.
Mrs. W. S.' Rambo and daughter went
to Joel today.
Have your - button on your coat by
Friday. It will be. a conspicuous omis-,
sion to be without a Red Cross- button on
that day.
Prof. F. W. Gail and little son, Har
old, leave tomorrow for Grcybull, Mont.,
where Alia Gail will visit his parents.
Sol Peiffer returned today from
Sautes, Wash., where he left Mrs. Peif
fer well, and his daughter, Airs. In
gram, recovering from influenza.
L. H. Ruchle of the S. A. T. C. went
to his home at Greer today, accompan
ied bv Airs. Ruchle,
Miss Lillian Warren has returned
from her school near Genesee, the school
being closed on account of influenza.
Leather traveling slippers in cases, for
men and women, at Wallace's Jewelry
store. A nice Xmas gift.
Air. and Mrs. B. Oliver from north
of Moscow are in town today.
Airs. Robert Bigham is in AIoscow
todav.
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Mrs. Carl Holland from north of
Moscow was shopping in the city yes
terday.
The plan of mailing a check to the
Red Cross Christmas Roll Call has
proved popular. If you have not joined
the Red Cross this week, a good scheme
would be to write the check tonight. i
Air. and Airs. J. J. Day arrived last j
evening on the 8 o'clock train from Spo-I
kane. They will spend the holidays in
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"The Paramount Theatre'
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YOU FORGET
HE'S A MAN
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JULIAN ELTIVIGE 1*
fnlheCleverAiYCarfex" |||
The greatest feature of
Mr. Eltinge's work is his
ability to make you forget
that he is £ man once he dons
feminine attire.
FRIDAY and SATURDAY
BIG BILL HART in
ture, not a reissue.
THE TIGER MAN'
-A new pic
I Moscow.
Mr. Joe Brown of Spokane
! will be their guest during the holiday
i season.
Airs. I. A Hawley has received the
unofficial news that Privatae L A.
Hawley is wounded,
I
I Air. and Mrs. C. Richardson were
passengers yesterday to Lewiston.
1 Miss Clara Nelson, a teacher of Pa
louse, has been a guest the past few
days of Airs. John Oberg and Airs. Ed.
Oberg,
j
Mrs. J. G. Gibson returned last evc
| ning from Spokane, where she left her
; son and family on the road to recovery
from influenza.
M f s ; S - R - R< ?y er f riv «I today from
Lewiston to visit a few days with her
father, J. W, DeWitt. of East- Eighth
street.
It takes only one dollar for each mem
ber of the family to join the greatest
humanitarian organization on the face
of the earth—the Red Cross.
E. MacAIartin went to Spokane yes
terday.
Aliss Anna Lyness" and Miss Agnes
Sterling went to Viola yesterday for
a few days' visit.
Airs. F. A. Thomson was a visitor yes
terday in Pullman.
Order now your Home-made Can
dies. Phone 266-J.
A large assortment of military watches
at Wallace's Jewelry Store.
Tag Days on Friday and Saturday of
this week will not lie very strenuous
ones if every citizen docs his duty be
fore that time and pays his dollar to
the Red Cross AT ONCE.
A vigorous childhood if carefully
guarded will result in a vigorous
manhood or womanhood. Negligence
in permitting children to eat food
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which is hard to digest has brought
stomach and bowel trouble to many
a household. Children are fond of
Oatmeal Blend; it is a wholesome and
nourishing food and easily digested.
Ask your grocer for it.
O. G. Brackert of Colfax is in Mos
cow today.
Mrs. R. L. Smith, wife of the well
known druggist "Bob" Smith, of Pa
louse, was in Moscow today between
trains.
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Universal membership
Cross ought not to be verv
a prosperous town
achieve.
in the Red
difficult for
like Moscow to
FIND EMPLOYMENT
FOR OUR SOLDIERS
GOVERNMENT LABOR SERVICE
PREPARED TO PLACE EVERY
MAN WANTING A JOB
Representatives of the United States
employment service now are stationed
in approximately 60 army camps and
cantonments in this country to fur
nish information to enlisted men as to
employment after discharge. Instruc
tions sent today to these representa
tives state that as each soldier goes
through the discharge procedure, he is
to be asked if he wishes to have assist
ance in finding work from the bureau
for returning soldiers now being es
tablished in every city and town in the
country.
Each man desiring such assistance will
hâve filled out for him a card, showing
his name, the town at which he expects
to apply for assistance, the kind of
position wanted and such other informa
tion as the time allowed will permit.
Wherever possible, the name of his
last employer also is to be included.
When filled out. the representative of
the federal employment service will sort
the cards by states and mail them to
the federal directors of the employment
service for the states in which the men
intend to apply. Soldiers also are to
be told that the bureaus for returning
soldiers arc ready to advise them on
questions which will confront them on
their return.
The representatives of the em
ployment service also were instructed to
day to wire the federal directors for the
states when any large number of men
arc being discharged for their states,
giving the number who will apply for
assistance, the predominating kinds of
occupation sought the approximate time
of arrival and the important points in
the states to which large numbers are
going.
Reports reaching the department of
labor show that in many camps the
cam]) commanders already are giving all
.
possible assistance to the representatives
of the employment service, telling the
men of their presence and the facilities
of the employment service by means of
movies, posters and pamphlets,
jutant general of the war department
has issued an order to caum commanders
authorizing them to furnish the repre
sentative of the federal employment
service with quarters and office space
when necessary.
The ad
NORTH IDAHO MEN
LEAVE HERE 100*1
THE I.AST OF SECTION R MEN
DEPART FOR THEIR HOMES
THIS AFTERNOON
The boys of the S A. T. C. are
leaving every day. Today 53 leave
for their homes and most of them live
in northern Idaho. The following are
their final destinations: Bonners
Ferry, 2; Coeur d'Alene. 10; Grange
ville, 7; Lewiston, 6; Nez Perce, 3;
•Orofino, 3; St. Maries, 4; Sandpoint,
6; Wallace, 10; and two or three to
southern Idaho.
Yesterday 94 of the boys left by the
Northern Pacific and 40 over the
O. W. R. & N., 132 being the total
{lumber leaving, as follows: American
Falls, 4; Arch, 2; Albion. 5; Black
foot, 7; Caldwell, 9; Council, 1; Chal
lis, 2; Gooding, 4; Hailey, 3; Boise,
Î5; Shoshone, 3; Malad, 3; Alountain
Home, 3; Rupert, 3; Pocatello, 13;
/Salmon, 3; Weiser, 4; Rigby, 4; Twin
Falls, 13; Idaho Falls, 8; Paris, 5;
St. Anthony, 7; Payette, 3; Silver
City, 1; Driggs. 1; Preston, 3; Fair
field, 1; Idaho City, 1; Minidoka, 1.
They all seem pleased to think of
getting home for Christmas.
TRE UNIVERSITY
EXPRESSES REGRET AT DEATH
OF AH LES F. REED, FORMER
FACULTY MEMBER
At a regular meeting, the faculty
the University of Idaho adopted by
standing vote the following resolution
on the death of Mr. Miles F. Reed,
president of the Idaho Technical In
stitute, Pocatello, Idaho.
"The announcement of the sudden
and unexpected death of Miles
Reed, president of the Idaho Technical
Institute, came as a shock to his
many university friends. Mindful
his earlier affiliation with the Uni
versity of Idaho, both as an alumnus
and later as one of its instructors,
the faculty desire to express their
appreciation of his worth as a man,.
an educator, and as a citizen.
. 1T _ , , ,
By his death Idaho has lost one c,
her conspicuous educators, and the
university mourns the loss of one of
her stalwart sons. His fine person
ality made and retained friendships.
He stood for ideals that were true and
lofty. To an expression of apprecia
tion of these fine qualities, the Uni
versity iaculty desire to add their sin
cere sympathy for the members of
his bereaved family and his col
leagues.
"In behalf of the university faculty,
"Ph. SOULEN,
"C. N. LITTLE,
"Committee."
LIVESTOCK DOINGS
MONEY TO FARMERS
BONNERS FERRY PAPER TELLS
OF IMPORTANCE OF LIVESOCK
INDUSTRY THERE
Chas, Smith of Porthill came up .Mon
day with 42 head of stock which he
sold to the City Meat Market. They
embraced eight calves, 23 yearlings, three
two-year-old steers, two two-year-old
bulls and six cows. Air. Smith received
an average of $50 a head for the
bunch.
Colen Smith, the same day. brought
in some pigs which brought him $40
each.
It would appear from these facts that
stock and hog raising in Boundary coun
ty ought to be a profitable occupation
at present prices, if a raiser can secure
the labor necessary to harvest the hay
and grain necessary to feed the ani
mals through the winter. In the sum
mer they will secure their own feed on
government forest reserve land, except
in the case of hogs, and a good alfalfa
field will keep them in fine condition.
:
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The enormous am unf of money paid
Postmaster General Modifies
Former Order
The Postmaster General directs us to reduce Service Con
nection Charges as follows;
Individual line from $10.00 to.
Party line from $5.00 to.
Extensions from $5.00 to.
For service where telephone is already installed and no
change made in class of service from $5.00 to.
$3.50
3.50
3.50
1.50
Moscow Telephone & Telegraph Co.
(Limited)
to farmers for meats in November may
be approximated by the following report
from the International Live Stock ex
position which was held in Chicago last
week :
Three million dollars an hour is the
record-breaking sum paid fanners of the
country in November, 1918, for live stock
used for meat pudposes, according to an
estimate made by experts at the inter
national live stock exposition and horse
fair, which closed here today.
_These estimates arc based on a seven
hour live stock tiîiynrg-iiaj'.jit the Chi
cago union stock yards and à sBWfe?'
we ek.
Producers recovered more than $31,
000,000 for hogs sold in the Chicago
market last month. I Ins estimate is
based on the arrival of 900,000 hogs at
the local stock yards, the minimum mar
ket price of which was

of
a
F.
of
fixed by the
government at $17.50 a hundred pounds.
Live stock experts declare that the
farmers now are receiving more than
twice as much for their hogs as be
fore the war and their shipments arc
from .10 to 15 per cent above normal.
The prices of cattle and sheep also
! have increased enormously compared
j with pre-war figures.—Kootenai Valley
| Times
DEARY GREAMEOY
MAY RUN ALL WINTER
IS NOW PAYING 60 CENTS A
POUND FOR BUTTER FAT
FARMERS MAKE MONEY
The Deary creamery is paying $1.20
for every two pounds of butter fat
it gets and is needing more cream.
Every week it sells out its product
slick and clean.
The plant is making a strong effort
to operate all winter. If it can do so
it will be easy to keep running next
winter, as producers will prepare
more fully, knowing that the cream
ery will be in a position to handle
cream all the year. An encouraging
feature at present is that a number
of farmers who had not before been
patrons are now bringing cream reg
ularly.
For the seven months ending De
cember 1 the creamery paid John
Sturman $350.25 for cream from 5
cows, three of them with their first
calves. Why are not others able to
do as well ? Is it the people or the
country?
This is a pretty good country. In
June we got cream from 86 people.
In submitting the above Manager
Randall stated that he considered the
outlook encouraging. There is a big
demand for butter and prices for fat
are likely to remain high.-*-Latah
County Press.
Where would Moscow have been dur
ing the influenza epidemic without the
Red Cross. Think of what the Red
Cross did for the civilian population ;
-'tid JOIN.
«
The rest of.the county is hard at work
getting signatures to the Red Cross
Christmas Roll Call,
lag behind in
the Red Cross.
Moscow must not
enthusiastic support of
«r



CONTRIBUTION BOX
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Star-Mirror
the university heads want jobs for the
boys so they can complete their school
CvftTr, work in Moscow.
This may he all "rigid, inn''? finder
if these parties know that there are*
men with families to send to school that
depend on these odd jobs for a living
1 through the winter,
1 notice in The Daily
Any able bodied man who is old
! enough to go to .the university should
I make enough in 'the summer time to
send him ui
out robbing the p
-bool in the winter, willi
n' working man.
J. P. JOHNSON.
(■c
Thompson Insurance Agency
Fire Insurance, Automobile and
Plate Glass Ihsurance, Fidelity and
Casualty Bonds
J. G. Vennigerholz, Prop.
Moscow, Idaho.
EXPERT Accountant
Income Tax Reporters
In Demand
We cannot begin to supply the
daily calls for Expert Accountants
and Bookkeepers.
We place you as soon as you are
qualified.
Write for Free Booklet.
PACIFIC EXTENSION
UNIVERSITY
Old National Bank Building
Washington
Spokane
Read The Daily Star-Mir
ror Want Ads.
COW and HORSE
HIDES
Made into
ROBES and OVERCOATS
Inland Market
Carl F. Anderson, Prop.
JL.
Creekmur's
Business
College
Opened last Monday with a good
enrollment.
Are you doing your bit in the
world Peace? Are you preparing
yourself for one of the many com
mercial opportunities that are open
to you ? If not, why not ? Tfcere
is no time like the present, enroll
today.

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