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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, December 17, 1918, Image 4

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1918-12-17/ed-1/seq-4/

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Here's some satisfactory answers to the
Christmas
Question
of what to give
For Women
Suits Waists Petticoats
Sweaters Gloves Handkerchiefs Hose
Silks Linens Dress Goods
Furs
Coats
For Men
New Suit Overcoat Sweater Mackinaw
Cap Hat Ties Handkerchief Gloves
Suit Case Bag Trunk Hose
Suspenders Arm Bands
You'H find good assortments of dependable qual
ity and at a price that will make you glad.
Creighton's
The Moscow Home of Good Clothes for Men and
Women
IS
mm
irff-jr
HARWICH, England. — (Corres
pondence of The Associated Press.)—
The business of actually accepting the
German submarines in äurrender was
performed by officers and men of the
Kn Sh four bm vear n s had" ÄSüieTa

of the British Isles. An admiral in
a light cruiser commanded the fleet
to which the U-boats surrendered but
it was a submarine officers who first
stepped aboard each submarine, curtly
went through with the brief formal!
ties and it was a crew of men who had
fought the U-boats by under 1 water
methods that manned it and took it
uncomnlaininirlv
stuck to a job that d was recognized by
the admiralty as one of the most un
attractive in the navy but it was end
GERMAN U-BOATS WERE TAKEN
IN CHARGE BY BRITISH SUB
MARINE FIGHTERS
to port
These men
In the name of all that is humane and merciful
JOIN
The Red Cross
Don't wait to be tagged.
Be a Volunteer
Pay your Dollar on Wednesday.
Booths are open all day at
THE POST OFFICE
VEATCH REALTY COMPANY'S OFFICE
THE UNIVERSITY
ed by participation in an event unique
in naval history and a fitting ending
for service performed.
Although British submarines al
ways were on the lookout for U-boats
their success in the war was not meas
ured by the number they destroyed.
Nevertheless it was co-incident that
20 U-boats should have been sunk by
British submersibles during the war
and it was the same number first sur
rendered to the British submarine
crews on the day the taking over of
the G erman fleet was inaugurated off
t j,; s port
' , ' • ...
As fa . r a ? Possible the admiralty
distinguished the honor of taking
Ä .ubÄ" Su ÄrteeS
»» »«re placed each = dered
boat and as they surrendered in
batches of twenty a total of 280 of
fjcers and men were flowed to pai
ticipate each day Every man looked
forward to t ' f nr first
wanted to be selected for the first
day s work but when they boarded
the beaten craft they maintained e
"lient discipline and orders against
any demonstration were so carefully
obeyed that it was almost an air of
disinterest that they went about their
duties. .
So much has been said ot t he _ in -
tricacies of the German submarine
that there were many misgivings
abong the British officers of their
ability to navigate them soon after
they had received them. They were
soon reassured, however, as nothing
so far different from other submar
ines was found,
twenty brought in was the U-136
which is 276 feet long, was completed
three months ago and had never been
to sea until she crossed the British
channel to be surrendered. Her type
attracted Commodore S. S. Hall, who
has been at the head of the British
submarine force since the beginning
of hostilities.
He was taken to the vessel soon
after she was plated in her berth in
the River Stour and inspected her
with the young British lieutenant who
had taken her over and brought her
into port with the aid of the German
engineers. Commodore Hall, about to
leave, smilingly asked the lieutenant
when he would be ready to "shove
off." But the young man took the
question seriously and promptly re
plied:
Among the first
I can take her to sea in a couple
She is freghtfully dirty
of hours.
but the engines are in good shape and
my men can operate them."
ft.
ELECTRIC HEATING
HEARING NOW IN PROGRESS AT
BOISE NOW DEVELOPS FACT
THAT COAL IS CHEAPER
BOISE, Idaho.—The first hearing
in the northwest on the subject of
general heating by use of electrical
energy is on in this city. It was con
vened on the initiative of the Idaho
public utilities commission and no
doubt certain startling, and wild
statements made during the recent
campaign had something to do with
the action of the commission, which
could not ,of course take up the mat
ter during the campaign. The com
mission invited all power companies
and all citizens having any informa
tion on the subject to be present.
A special invitation was sent to
Joe Burns, who campaigned the state
for the nonpartisan league and made
sensational statements about the avail
ability and cost of power, but he did
not appear. The commission sent a
subpoena for him with a statement
it would pay his expenses. It is con
tended that Burns has no real know
ledge of the subject and that his
statements were without foundation in
fact and made for political purposes
as well as to deliberately disseminate
misinformation,
other nonpartizosn league agent, also
made statements that the commission
may ask him to explain. Every bit
of available knowledge is sought and
the evidence comes not only from
power companies but from professors
of leading colleges, where they hold
chairs of electrical engineering and
physics.
Ray McKaig, an
Not Enough Power.
Dr. Merrill, professor of electrical
engineering of the University of Utah,
testified that if all the power avail
able in Snake river, from American
Falls west; and tributaries and
springs, were used exclusively for
heating purposes there would not be
enough to supply the population in
that district, irrespective of cost. He
supported his statement with detailed
and authenticated figures.
Cost Per Kilowatt.
It was brought out by various en
gineers that the cost per kilowatt
of producing juice in this territory
was over $20 at the present time.
This was the cost to the Idaho Power
company and included only operating,
maintenance and taxes and not in
terest on the investment or depreci
The cost of supplying juice for the
average house of five rooms was
given at $300 to $442 a year, depend
ing on winter climatic conditions, as
against around $60 for coal.
The cost of installing the necessary
wiring and heaters was generally
agreed to be $200 to $300 for each
house, depending upon local regula
tions as to use of conduits, etc.
Results From Grace Plant.
H. M. Ferguson, electrical engineer
of the Utah Power & Light company,
testified that if the entire capacity
of its best plant, at Grace, were used
for heating purposes alone, cutting off
lights and power for industrial pur
poses, it would not be sufficient to
heat fore than 1100 of the 1332 houses
of McCammon, Soda Springs, Ban
croft, Georgetown, Montpelier and
Paris.
Would Deprive Industries.
The managers of small electric
plants all declared it would be im
practical to furnish electric energy
for .heating in their territory at any
cost. The capacities were not suffici
ent and the available water power to
be developed would not bring them
up to meet a general demand. Some
said they had surplus power that if
used under compulsion for heating,
irrespective of price, would deprive
industry, and especially mining, of
needed power at seasonable periods
and their communities of many
thousands of dollars.
Mrs. Isley's Letter.
In a recent letter Mrs. D. W. Isley
•of Litchfield, Ill-, says, "I have used
Chamberlain's Tablets for disorders
of the stomach and as a laxative, and
have found them a quick and sure
relief." If you are troubled with in-
digestion or constipation these tablets
will do you good. D
-pn
Don't wait to be drafted. Join the
Red Cross of your own free will,
---ft
For Croup.
"Chamberlain's Cough Remedy is
splendid for croup," writes Mrs. Ed
ward Hassett, Frankfort, N. Y. "My
children have been quickly relieved
of attacks of this dreadful complaint
by its use." This remedy contains
no opium or other narcotic, and may
be given to a child as confidently as
to an adult. D

9B3
The New
Silk Blouses
u
V
:
104
il
*
&
are unusually attractive. They are just as pretty as they can be. As a gift, they will please
any woman.
You will find a saving too, of a dollar or more on each waist. They are marked
very moderately for quick Christmas selling
3.75 to 10.00
Some Ideas For Gift Shoppers
KAYSER'S PHOENIX AND
GORDON SILK HOSIERY.
BEAUTIFUL CAMISOLES
FRENCH IVORY
SILK PETTICOATS
KID GLOVES
FUR PIECES
AN ANIMAL SCARF, $7.50
TO $25.00
SILK KIMONAS
LATE STYLE NECKWEAR
A WOOL SHAKER,
SWEATER OR SHAWL
TABLE LINENS
TOWEL SETS
Phone 80 GROCERY DEPARTMENT
SPECIALS FOR CHRISTMAS COOKING
Swan's Down Cake Flour, special.
Cleveland Baking Powder, regular 60c,
Special, 1 lb...
Baker's Premium Chocolate, regular 50c,
Special, lb.■.
Arm & Hammer Soda, 3 for.
Ghirardelli's
sizes
45c
Argo Corn Starch, 20-oz. pkg. ...
Bleached Raisins, fancy, 2 pounds
Seeded Raisins, 2 pkgs.
15c
35c
47c
25c
JUNO SPICES, BURNETTS AND BUCKEYE
EXTRACTS
Have a Red Can of Hills Bros. Coffee for
Christmas Dinner.
45c
25c
Ground Chocolate, three
.20c, 35c and 1.00
D A V I DS'
'SANTA CLAUS HEADQUARTERS'
c
5nipr
IDAHO'S PRIMARY
LAW MAY BE CHANGED
GROWING DISSATISFACTION
WITH PRESENT CONDITIONS
CALL FOR REFORMS
BOISE.—Growing dissatisfaction over
the Idaho primary law makes reason
ably certain some action by the next leg
islature either to modify the present
law so that the integrity of party lines
will be guaranteed, or to guarantee this
result by a return to the convention sys
tem. Democratic leaders, who lost their
organization to the Nonpartisan league
when the league members disregarded
party lines and went into the democratic
primaries and nominated their candi
dates on the democratic ticket, are es
pecially insistent that the law he mod
ified or repealed.
Administration legislation will lean
strongly to farm interests, according to
D. W. Davis, republican, governor-elect.
Radical changes in the farm markets
bureau, and enlargement of its func
tions. and a system of bonded ware
houses are some of the items said to be
especially favored by the new adminis
tration.
An appropriation for the organiza
tion of a regiment of militia to replace'
the Second Idaho, sent to France with
the federalized guard, will be asked.
Land board legislation may be sub
mitted to replace the present state land
board composed of ex-officio members,
with an appointive state land commission
to have executive jurisdiction over the
state's endowment lands and its Carey
Act project interests.
ft!
DR. I. J. COGSWELL IS
NOW IN MINNEAPOLIS
Friends in Moscow have recently re
ceived letters from Dr. I. J. Cogswell,
stating that his headquarters arc now in
Minneapolis. Dr. Cogswell was former
ly the very successful head of the music
department at the university and has
many sincere friends and admirers in
Moscow who realize the •wonderful de
velopment of the music department un
der his direction. Since leaving Moscow
Dr. Cogswell has held an important po
sition in the Sherwood school of music
in Chicago. His success has been so
conspicuous that he has been made the
representative of this famous school in
the whole territory tributary to Min
neapolis.
N. P. Got Many Soldiers.
Instead of the entire south Idaho
contingent of section B, S. A. T. C.,
going over the O. W. R. & N. yester-
day evening as had been expected, 95
of them went on Northern Pacific.
Of these 85 went to southern Idaho,
via Spokane and Montana, and 10
went to points on the coast. About
70 ment left on the O.-W. R. & N.
evening train. Two extra coaches
were added to the regular north
bound train on the Northern Pacific
and these were filled with the S. A.
T. C. men from Moscow.
-ft-• _
Beginning Wednesday morning pat-
rons of the postoffice will please mail
all outgoing parcels at the SOUTH
WINDOW. The government is re-
questing that all patrons mail their
Christmas parcels EARLY.
IMBRUES PLANNED
FOR A REVOLUTION
EVIDENCE BROUGHT OUT AT
SACRAMENTO SHOWS CONNEC
TION WITH THIS STATE
SACRAMENTO, Cal.—By introduc
aMttiïï wTteiïf îhïWt"
charged with plotting to hinder war
work, the government, it was announc
ed, expects to show early revolutionary
principles as the basis of the I. W. W.
organization. Against this background,
officials said, testimony touching upon
specific acts o^ the defendants is to he
projected.
The government expected to complete
evidence today to identi
p the defendants as I. W . W. members,
Correspondence files, one for virtually
every defendant, are being used in this
identification process, a dozen having
been accepted temporarily by United
States Judge F. H. Rudkin pending rul
ing on the objection of the defense
against their introduction.
Witnesses from Chicago and the
northwest have arrived here to testify
as to the connection of the I. W. W.
groups in California with the central
body and with organizations in Wash-
ington, Idaho and Montana.
-ft
Noted Indian Rider Here.
Jackson Sundown, the noted Indian
rider ,and his squaw passed through
Moscow yesterday on their way to
Lewiston. Sundown is one of the Nez
Perce tribe and has ridden at all the
great bucking contests in the north
west. In 1893 he won the world
championship in wild west riding at
the World's Fair in Chicago.
%
Make Next Washday Easy
Yes—Get .he biggest washing out and on the line before 10 o'clock.
No launches* required. Push a button and the THOR will do the
work. Ng wages to pay anyone. No meals to serve. What a dif
ference between this and the old wasteful way of wearing out the
clothes on x washboard and rubbing and wringing most of the day!
m
ir
If
Electric
Washing Machine
SHn)
dees a good s.zed washing in an houi. Costs only 2c an lour for electricity.
Positively the most economical way to wush. The THOR actually pays for
itself as it goes along. It saves more than it costs. Over 130,000 women have
already proved that in their homes. Come and we will prove it also. We will
show you how to get better washing done for less than it costs you now.
$5.00 BRINGS THE THOR TO YOUR HOME
Then $5.00 a month until paid for, and it is yours. Sold on our
guarantee that it will do all we claim or your money back.
Come this week- come before next washday. Let us show you how it
money and drudgery and gives a woman a day of leisure.
saves
Washington Water P
Co.
ower
Army Aviator Killed.
RIVERSIDE, Cal.—Lieutenant R. L.
Campbell of New York, army aviator
stationed at March field, near here,
instantly killed today when, after ma
king a forced landing he was struck
by the propeller of his machine.
was
It is better to volunteer the dollar
for the Red Cross than to be asked for
it on Friday and Saturday.
"HOW AMERICA'S WOUNDED
SOLDIERS WILL BE RETURNED
Har with his charges he applies for a
hospital car or train, according to the
size of his t a ' nd for a * egcort
of doctors nurses and order lies. If a
train is assigned , the journey, even
across the continent, is simple, but
if the wounded fill only one car, which
must be attached to regular trains,
the feeding problem becomes acute.
Here the Red Cross lends its aid, ar
ranging by telegraph with its auxili
aries along the way for meals for the
travelers at points where neither din
ing car service nor station restau
rants are available.
The hospital trains, equipped
specially constructed Pullman sleep
ing and kitchen cars, have accommo
dations both for "walking cases" and
for men so severely injured that they
must remain abed both day and night.
In anticipation of their use on an
extensive scale, fifty officers and 200
men are in training here, and a small
er company at Newport News, as es
cort detachments.
(Continued from page One.)
assignments made to reconstruction
or convalescent hospitals.
The next process is the attachment
of a medical liasion officer to the
group he is to conduct to an interior
station. When he has become fami
with

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