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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, December 19, 1918, Image 4

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1918-12-19/ed-1/seq-4/

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Thumbnail for PAGE FOUR

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OBERG BROTHERS
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GROCERY DEPARTMENT
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You'll find a good assortment of Pure and Wholesome
Food for your Christmaf Dinner
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.'30c, 50c
$1.25
Lillys Salad Dressing.
Monarch Mint Sauce.
Watkins Mint.
Eagle Chilli Paw.
Cresco Mushroom Paw
Kitchen Bouquet.
Libbys Moist Mince Meat,
2-lb. jar .
Swansdown Cake Flour..
Agents for the Holsum Bread,
fresh every day. 16-oz. loaf 10c;
24-oz. loaf 15c.
FRUITS
Green Onions, per bunch.
Brussel Sprout, per pound
Cauliflower, per head....
Cranberries, per quart. . .
Green Peppers, per pound
Fresh Cucumbers, each. . .
Fresh Tomatoes, per pound. ... 15c
Sweet Potatoes, per pound
NUTS
Walnuts, S. S., No. 1, per lb., 38c
Almonds, S. S., per pound
Filberts, per pound.
Brazil, per pound.
Peanuts, per pound.
Almonds, per pound.
Salted Peanuts, per pound
Good assortment of Woodward's
Pure Sugar Candy at lowest possi
ble price per pound.
5c
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50c
Oranges, per dozen....
Bananas, per pound. . .
Grape Fruits, each. ...
Figs, two packages for
Cresco Stuffed Figs, per jar... .60c
20c
40c to 70c
25c
30c
13c
40c
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12^c
20c
40c
20c
15c
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50c
Marshmallow Movsse, per can, 20c
Comb Honey
Pure Strained Honey, per pint, 60c
Queen Olives, pitted and stuffed
with almonds.
Pimientos and Stuffed
Olives.
Maraschino Cherries .
Bass Island Grape Juice
Welchs Grape Juice. . .
Hinze Beefstead Sauce.
Monarch Chilli Sauce. .
Swanns Salad Dressing, 20, 30, 60c
18c
40c
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French Marrons in Vanilla Syrup,
35c
85c
5c
per jar
Hawaiian Pineapple, cut in large
squares, per jar
Lyons Glace Cherries, per pint. .85c
Preferred Stock Seeded Muscots,
per pound
Fancy Cluster Raisins, per lb., 30c
Hinze Fig Pudding
70c
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45c
50c
65c
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32c
20c and 50c
.35c
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15c
32c
Fresh Cookies of all kinds.
Preferred Stock Canned Goods.
Chase & Sanborns Tea and Cof
fee, per pound, 35c to 45c.
Royal Club and Golden West
Coffee, per pound, 30c to 40c.
32c
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35c
60c
28c
30c
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VEGETABLES
Celery, per bunch.
Head Lettuce, per head, 10c and 15c
35c
SHELLED NUTS
Walnut Halves, per pound..$1.25
Salted Pecans, per pound. . . .$1.65
25c
15c
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Phone 73 or 97.
MOSCOW, IDAHO.
Corner of Third and Washington.
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FOR STUDENTS
PRESIDENT LINDLEY SPEAKS OF
NEXT QUARTER PLANS FOR
UNIVERSITY
"As a result of the demobilization
of the Students' Army Training
Corps,'' says President Lindley, "many
students will wish to change their
Studies. In order to provide for this
the University will offer at the begin
liing of the next quarter, opening Jan
uary 6th, beginning courses in many
departments,
placed on preparation for the recon
struction era now at hand. Many
former students now in the camps
Rre planning to return to the uni
<Nsrsity.
"Military training will be under the
Iwovisions of the Reserve Officers'
Training Corps which will provide
compulsory work for the first two
years and opportuhity to qualify in
the upper classes for officers' com
missions. Although details are not
yet worked out, it is probable
that the War Department will provide
compensation for all members of the |
Emphasis will be
Corps, with generous provision for
equipment.''
tm
tWO WEEKS' COURSE
ON TRACTORS
Agricultural Engineering Depart
ment Assisted by Factory Men.
At the recent meeting of the Na
tional Implement Association in Chi
cago the question of "Education in
Tractors" was discussed, and Junius
f. Cook, Assistant Secretary of Agri
coltore, said: "The more the farmer
stillzes the sources of knowledge of
tractors the more successful he will
he with his machine."
Daring the coming season there will
he 1600 to 2000 machines in use in
Idaho. If these men know how to
properly adjust and care for their
machines it will increase the amount
of crops saved and will prolong the
Ute of their tractors. An operator
who is not able to make adjustments
his machine may lose hours or
a v eu days of valuable time in the
bnsy season. A knowledge of how
to go about to make the proper ad
justment may save him^pll this loss.
Come to school and make these ad
justments under the direction of men
acquainted with these machines. /If
yea are a prospective buyer, come
and study the construction and opera
tion of different makes of machines.
Monday, January 27, is enrollment
day and Friday, February 7, will
close the course. Bring your cover
alls and be ready to get into the
grease. You will learn to do by doing.
If you desire to enroll in the Tractor
Short Course, Jan. 27-Feb. 7, notify
J. C. Wooley, Ag. Eng. Dept., U. of I.,
Moscow, Ida., stating the type of
tractor you wish to become acquaint
ed with.
A,.
EXTENSION CONFERENCE
AT THE UNIVERSITY
-
The Annual Conference of all work
ers of the University of Idaho Exten
scion Division will be held at Moscow,
January 27-February 1. This week
is the one prior to the dates selected
for the Annual Farmers and House
keepers' Week.
This conference, which will necessi
tate the presence at the University of
all extension workers in agriculture
and home economics, will also have in
attendance the agricultural instruc
tion force, agricultural experiment'
station workers and home economics
instructors of the University,
meeting has for its purpose unifica
tion of University effort in agricul
ture and home economics on the
The
campus at Moscow and wherever in
Idaho work is done by members of
extension staff, or by experimental
farm superintendents. Plans and pro
gram of work for 1919 will be given
first consideration.
^
PRACTICAL COURSE GIVEN
VOCATIONAL MEN OF S.A.T.C.
; Training Valuable After Returning
• Home,
i
One half hour each day is devoted
to lecture work and six hours to shop
work in the Vocational School of the
University of Idaho, so that the stu
dents learn by "doing" rather than
from the textbook without the prac
tice.
In the automobile school the men
are classified at enrollment time ac
cording to the "amount of experience
they have had. Those who have had
no experience are placed in the rear
axle and chassis department where
they study different types of frames,
springs, and rear axles. They must
become thoroly acquainted with four
standard makes of rear axles so that
they can build them up and adjust
them. Steering gear adjustments and
wheel alignments also are given
special attention. Transmission, as
sembly and adjustment also come In
for consideration in this department.
is
Whenever this work has been thorofy
mastered the men are transferred
j
| and adjust them on the motor,
the motor department. Here the work
consists of assembling motors from
the parts, possibly pouring and scrap
ing the bearings, fitting piston rings,
threading valves and finally timing
the motor and testing it out on the
block. Students are required to dip
semble a number of carbureters,
study and assemble, and then install
When a man has satisfied the in
structor in this department he is then
ready for the public service depart-
ment or the electrical department.
At the beginning the men who have
the broader knowledge of cars and
their care are placed in these two de
partments.
In the public service department a
regular garage is maintained and
work is done on cars in the usu$I
way. The shop is equipped with a
reboring machine and the foundry in
connection makes possible the instal
lation of new pistons. There is no
charge for the work and nothing is
guaranteed. However, the quality of
wor k that has been done has been
up
to standard with very few exceptions.
In the electrical department the
men are required to dissemble and
rebuild magnetos, starting motors,
generators, voltage regulators, stor
age batteries, and should in the two
months time become thoroly familiar
with the electrical systems used on
the modern car.
The general mechanics department
gives instruction and practice in tin
and sheet metal work, blacksmithing,
carpentry, and lathe work and ma
chine shop practice.
In the radio school the men learn
to send and receive messages at a
certain required speed, and they also
must be able to send and receive by
th government system of signalling.
In all, the University of Idaho Vo
cational School has trained 600 men
for tba government, distributed as
follows: 210 In auto mechanics un
der the Agricultural Engineering De
partment; 170 in general mechanics,
under the Mechanical Engineering
De partm e nt and 120 in the radio
work, under the Electrical Engineer
ing Department.
Thua has the University of Idaho
served the Government in time of
need. Jhe Vocational School, if con
tinued, Éould render valuable service
in time of peace.
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Eastman on I. C. Commission.
WASHINGTON.—Joseph B. East
man of Massachusetts has been, chosen
by President Wilson to succeed George
W. Anderson as a member of the in
terstate commerce commission.
| AGRICULTURAL MEETINGS
AT TWIN FALLS
sociations will have separate sessions
with certain joint sessions of more
j gefteral interest. Seed growers, irri
gation men, grain growers, dairymen
and producers of livestock are among
those who will be particularly bene
fitted.
A number of the members of the
University's Extension Division will
take part in the Twin Falls pro
grams.
vited from the University's staff at
Moscow are President E. H. Lindley,
E. J. Iddings, dean of agriculture,
John C. Wooley, professor of agricul
tural engineering, and H. W. Hul
bert, assistant professor of farm
crops.
Twin Falls is preparing to entertain
a record crowd.
The annual meetings of the Agri
cultural and Irrigation Societies of
Idaho will be held for this year at
Twin Falls, January 13-16 inclusive.
Each of the various societies and as
Among those specially in
SCHOOL OF PRACTICAL AGRI
CULTURE SECOND TERM
OPENS JANUARY 5
The winter term of the -School of
Practical Agriculture will open Janu
ary 6th.
weeks. Beginning classes will be or
ganized, and every effort made to
accommodate students who have re
cently been discharged from army
training camps or who have been pre
vented by unusual labor conditions
from entering school earlier. Instruc
tion will be offered in the follow
ing subjects: Soils, crops, vegetable
gardening farm machinery, livestock
feeding, breeding, farm management,
accounting, English, botany and farm
machematics.
Catalog and full particulars will be
sent upon application to Principal C.
B. Wilson, University of Idaho.
The term lasts for ten
HOCHBAUM LEAVES IDAHO
GOES TO WIDER FIELD
W. W. Hochbaum, County Agent
Leader, has left farm bureau work
in Idaho, having sent in his resigna
tion to take effect December first.
Mr. Hochbaum joins the Office of
Extension Work, North and West,
Washington, D. C., and is associated
with the county agent section, of
which Mr. W. A. Lloyd has charge,
to help in the organisation of farm
bureau work over the northern and
western states.
Mr. Hochbaum joined the Idaho ex
tension force early in the game, and
was one of the two county agents
employed in Idaho in 1913. He began
the work as county agent leader in
1914, when only three men were em
ployed. Since then the Idaho system
of farm bureaus has been developed
until the state now has thirty-four
couaty farm bureaus and thirty coun
ties employing agents. Outside of
Nezperce, Idaho, and Adams counties,
the major part of Idaho's agricultural
area is as a consequence now served
with farm bureaus.
The farm bureau organization of
Idaho ranking with the best of Am
erica, remains a tribute to Mr. Hoch
baum's ability and efficiency in or
ganization work.
Assistant State Leader, F. L. Wil
liams is acting as state leader.
EXTENSION WORKERS ASSIST
DURING FLU EPIDEMIC
During the period that meetings
could not be held because of the quar
antine, many of the home demonstra
tion agents connected with the Ex
tension Division of the University
rendered valuable service to their
communities.
Miss Dorothy Taylor, district home
demonstration agent, located at Mos
cow, acted as night nurse in the large
S. A. T. C. hospital at the University.
Mrs. Lillian Miller, city worker, at
Pocatello, organized and managed a
I
community kitchen in which meals
were prepared and sent to families
who could not prepare them on ac
count of sickness. As many as 171
meals a day were served from this
kitchen.
Miss Lela Bullock, home demonstra
tion agent of Bonneville county, also
established a community kitchen and
in co-operation with Mr. Macbeth, the
labor specialist, succeeded in placing
over 80 nurses in homes where no
other help could be obtained.
State Leader Amy Kelly and Mrs.
Alpha Holt, home demonstration
agent at large, who are located at
Boise, assisted at St. Luke's hospital
during the week when help was need
ed so desperately.
in 1917.
R. H. MUSSER BECOMES
ASSISTANT STATE LEADER
Mr. R. H. Musser, who has been
county agent of Canyon county since
April, 1917, was promoted to the po
sition of Assistant County Agent
Leader, November 1, 1918. During
Mr. Musser's term of service as coun
ty agent, the Canyon County Farm
Bureau has made great strides, in
creasing the membership from six
hundred forty to eight hundred twen
ty-five, in spite of the fact that Pay
ette county, with two hundred mem
bers, was carved out of the county
Mr. Musser's energetic
leadership and experience will be of
great service now in the state-wide
development of farm bureaus.
IDEALS
Alvin H. Sanders, editor of the
Breeders' Gazette, feels that there are
things in farm life of far more im
portance than money. He recently
expressed this view in the following
words: "The things of the spirit are
the true treasures of existence.
Money-getting is all right, pursued by
honest rational methods, but he who
builds for the general welfare rather
than exclusively for himself is acquir
ing that which cannot be taken
away.
"We urge farmers always to im
prove their places and their livestock,
not altogether for the purpose of bet
tering themselves and families in a
purely material sense, but because of
the sweetening, refining influences of
right environment."
*a
EXPERIMENTS WITH
SLICK SPOTS"
Soils .Worker Undertakes Important
Work.
E. B. Hitchcock, extension specialist
and research worker, is experimenting
with special treatments to overcome
the "slick spots" in the irrigated dis
tricts of the state. These experiments
are conducted in cooperation with
farmers in Ada, Canyon, Gem, Pay
ette, and Washington counties. All
of the farmers visited showed a great
desire to cooperate in this work, as
they realize the necessity of overcom
ing this unfavorable condition.
These areas are staked off and each
given a different treatment, such as
applying manure or strawand deep
plowing; top dressing with manure,
subsoiling, blasting with dynamite;
and fall and spring plowing.
Accurate yields are taken of the
crops growing on treated areas to be
compared with those from untreated
areas to determine the value of such
treatments.
Such experiments and demonstra
tions are of great benefit to the farm
ers as they are carried out under
actual farm conditions and the farmer
can see the effects from the different
methods so that he will be able to
follow the one best suited to his con
ditions.
TV
Five carloads of Fremont county
certified potato seed were sold at
$2.50 per cwt. Market potatoes have • 4
been selling at $1.25 to $1.50 per
cwt. Thru the farm bureau, in co
operation with Mr. E. R. Bennett,
Extension Horticulturist, more seed
is being certified.

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