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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, December 23, 1918, Image 4

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1918-12-23/ed-1/seq-4/

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SCHOOL OF MINES
TO START NEW WORK
SKEELS
FRANK
TO BE INSTRUCTOR IN TRAV
ELING TRADE SCHOOL
LIEUTENANT
"We expect in the course of a few
days to begin actual instruction in
the traveling mining trade school,''
said Dean Francis A. Thomson, of
the Idaho School of Mines in a state
ment issued yesterday,
is being established under joint fed
eral and state auspices as a part of
the trades and industries training
provided for by the federal board for
vocational education, created by the
Smith-Hughes act.
"This act was in a large measure
fathered by the American Federation
of Labor, and Samuel M. Gompers has
declared himself as approving cordi
ally of the opportunities thus being
given to the workers in various in
dustries to improve their skill and
thus enable them to do their work
more easily and rapidly, and in most
cases to add thereby to their wages.
"We have been delayed in getting
work started on this project by the
great difficulty in finding a suitable
man as the first instructor. This we
have finally been able to do by ob
taining the release, immediately after
the armistice, of Lieutenant F. H.
Skeels, who has been in the engineers'
training camp at Camp Humphrey.
Mr. Skeels is well known throughout
the Coeur d'Alene country, having be
gun as a boy working in the mines
here 20 years ago. He has the repu
tation of being a thoroughly practical,
skilled miner of varied and extensive
experience, with the further advant
age of being a graduate mining en
gineer. Shortly before entering the
■engineer corps Mr. Skeels was in
charge of the Success mine, on Nine
Mile, and prior to that engagement
he was superintendent of the Granite
Poorman, near Nelson, B. C.
"This is of course a new venture,"
The trade
"The school
says Dean Thomson,
school plan has been applied to al
most all industries except mining. As
a new venture it will of course have
to begin in a tentative way and plans
will have to be kept flexible. Based
upon what we have seen and heard
so far this week, our idea is that the
fi
M\
l(
>
eg
Cs
Half a Century Ago
Haifa Century Ago, every community could
be supplied to some extent with locally dressed
meat, drawing on live stock raised ncai by.
Now two-thirds of the consuming centers,
with millions of people, are one to two thousand
miles away from the principal live-stock produc
sections, which are sparsely settled.
The American meat packing industry of
today is the development of the best way to
perform a national service.
The function of providing meat had to de
velop accordingly. Those men who first grasp
ed the elements of the changing problem created
best facilities to meet it—large packing
plants and branch houses at strategic points,
refrigerating equipment (including cars), car
trained organization, profitable outlets
Ulg
the
routes,
for former waste — which became the nat
inevitable channels for the vast flow of
ural,
meat across the country.
If there were a better way to perform this
necessary service, American ingenuity and
enterprise would have discovered it, and others
would now be using it.
During 1918, Swift & Company has earned
a profit on meats (and meat by-products) of less
than 234 cents per dollar of sales—too small a
profit to have any appreciable effect on prices.
Swift & Company,
U. S. A.
Jbinthe
fed Goa
v
best way to utilize the funds available
for the benefit of the mining industry
and of the men engaged in it, is by
taking small squads of young teach
able men and putting them to work
under ground in charge of the in
structor.
devote himself to doing what the shift
bosses and older miners have been
doing for years in addition to their
other tasks, namely, showing the new
men how to do their work to the best
advantage. In addition to the under
ground instruction, blackboard work
and discussion of mining methods, and
other mining subjects are contem
plated.
"It is hoped that the consent of
the companies may be obtained for
these men to receive their instruction
partly at least on company time.
"Mr. Skeels and I are devoting this
week to a study of mining and milling
methods at the various properties and
finding out by talking with the vari
ous superintendents, foremen and
shift bosses what lines offer greatest
promise for the work of the school.
In the introduciotn of this as a new
idea, we expected to encounter a good
deal of skepticism and passive opposi
tion. In this we have so far been
most agreeably disappointed, doubt
less owing to the progressiveness
which characterizes the mining prac
tice of the Coeur d'Aleoes."—Wallace
Press-Times.
The instructor will then
CONGRESSMAN FRENCH'S
BILL REPORTED FAVORABLY
Congressman
Burton L. French appeared before
the committee on public lands today
and obtained a favorable reports rec
ommending the passage of his bill
granting to the soldiers, sailors and
marines of the present war and also
of the Mexican border troubles, the
right to apply their period of service
in lieu of residence on homestead
lands. Congressman Smith of Idaho,
who la a member of the committee
bn public lands, was authorized to
make the report.
WASHINGTON.
«
Dean Iddings Goes East.
Dean E. J. Iddings, head of the ag
ricultural college and experiment sta
tion of the university, has gone to
southern Idaho to visit several coun
ties and inspect the work being done
there, after which he goes to Wash
ington, D. C., to attend the national
convention of agricultural college
heads. He will be gone until some
time in January.
STAR-MIRROR,
THE DAILY
ALL WILL GET JOBS
To Be No Slump in the Demand
for Labor.
Devastated Europe Will Look to
United States to Help
Rebuild.
New York.—Jobs for all will be had
for the asking in the period of the
world's reconstruction. There's to be
no slump in the demand for labor.
It has been estimated that no fewer
than 10,000,000 men have been killed
in Europe. The»Unlted States, which
has not lost 15,000 men, must make
good this huge labor loss.
Devastated Europe will look to the
United States for help to rebuild. We
must finance this big job and supply
the materials and tools.
According to M. Tardieu, French
high commissioner, it will take two
years to get the French coal mines in
working order and ten years to put
them In prewar condition. To recon
struct private homes alone will re
quire. the work of 100,000 men for 20
years.
Prof. Van den Yen of Louvain, now
In the United States, says the war
losses of Belgium total approximately
$4,000,000,000. Before the drive more
than 45,000 buildings had been de
stroyed. Practically all the important
factories have been robbed of their
machinery, and, in many cases, not
only the walls razed but the very foun
dations destroyed.
The machinery was shipped to Qer
Towns and villages have been
many.
wrecked. Farms have been robbed of
Miles of interurban
all live stock,
railroads have been torn up and
shipped to Germany.
The problem is first to keep alive
the population released by Germany ;
second, to reconstruct the industrial
machine so the people can make a
living.
England also will want food, manu
factured goods, raw material and ma
chinery in great quantities.
Italy and the Scandinavian countries.
So will
George B. Roberts of the National
City bank maintains that the United
States will pass out of the war period
with more wealth than she possessed
before the conflict began. There has
been much scientific development of
industry, and agriculture has been
stimulated as never before.
There Is no obstacle, he thinks,
to a continuance of business activity
except the difficulty of readjusting
business to a peace basis. This obsta
cle is great but surmountable.
• sj. • # • sf. • # • V •V & • V'•V••V
J HE SURE IS A BIG
MAN AT THE FRONT *
a
53
«■
»3
a mule *
Kan.—Is
Topeka,
53
• driver essential to the winning •
• of the war? This is the prob- •
» iem before the industrial ad- J
• vlsory board of the First dis- «
• trict. It was the first case to *
• come before the board. The mule •
J driver claims his work Is essen- J
53- tlal to the operation of a Kan- #
5. sas mine.
• •
• q. • sf. • Jÿ. • • v m J? • • & • V- •# V •
>3
TAKE PRISONERS *IN AIRPLANE
British Flyers Round Up Sixty-Five
Huns and Herd Them Into
Camp.
With the British Army In France.—
Airplanes can be used for capturing
infantry. It was proved by the Brit
ish in the recent advance.
Flying fairly low, seeking parties
of Germans or war material to bomb,
two officers in one machine were fired
upon from a sunken road. The pilot
dived and the airplané machine quick
ly accounted for four Germans. Very
quickly the Germans hoisted a white
flag in token of surrender.
The airmen were In a dilemma, as
there was no British Infantry In the
vicinity. They descended to 50 feet,
however, and ordered the Germans out
of the road—65 of them in all. They
obeyed. Then rounding up the party,
the airmen directed them toward the
British lines. They circled over them
with the ever-menacing bombs and
machine guns until they encountered a
party of British, who took the entire
lot to a prisoners' cage.
DUTCH TAKE TO BAGPIPES
"DoedeizakspeeI"*Latest Craze In Hol
land and People Can't Got
Enough.
London.—Doedeizakspeel Is all the
rage at The Hague.
Doedeizakspeel Is Dutch for bag
pipes.
Some of the British released pris
oners have brought the bagpipes, and
their kilties, through Holland—ahO
Ddedeizakspeel has become the jazz
band of the nation.
No cabaret is complete without It,
and highland flings are flung about the
restaurants of the white light district
with the same abandon Broadway
knew when the tango was at its high
est.
Near Beer Too Near.
Pittsburgh, Pa.—Near beer that was
too near brought warrants to nearly
400 proprietors of drug stores, gro
certes and soda fountains In the Bast
Liberty section. The warrants
charged selling liquor without a U
cense. It was said that the near beer I
contained more alcohol than In the j
real art'cle. 1
sgjffiSBaaaaaaaBHag
^ à
Flour, Coal
Mill Feed
The Moscow Union Warehouse Company has just received an
other carload of the celebrated
PRIMROSE HARDWHEAT FLOUR
j
From the Townsend Mills at Townsend, Montana. We had been un
able to get this flour for a time, but now have a large supply of it. This
flour has given splendid satisfaction. Try a sack of it.
À
COAL and WOOD
!*
Another large supply of that splendid coal that has given such
good satisfaction. Another lot of excellent wood and a good supply
of posts now on hand.
f:
MILL FEED
Another big shipment of mill feed just received. This is the best
and cheapest feed for cows and hogs at this time of year.
GROCERIES
The Farmers Store has received a fresh supply of Staple and
Fancy Groceries and a fine assortment of Dainties for the Christmas
dinner. ALWAYS THE BEST GOODS AND LOWEST PRICES.
i
! I
Farmers' Union
Warehouse Co
3nl
pnl
WILL BUILD US
PLANNING TO RAISE MORE
CORN AND INCREASE DAIRY
PRODUCTS NEXT YEAR
That the continued agitation by
those interested in making the Upper
Potlatch a first class dairy country
is beginning to bear fruit, is indicated
by the fact that at least three* farmers
residing near Deary, and possibly
the neighborhood, are plan
ning to build silos next spring.
These ranchers have found that de
voting their ground year after year
to raising wheat, even at the present
high prices, does not pay. Two short
crops in succession have started these
men to thinking in terms of milk
cans and good cows. They can easily
keep from six to 20 cows each, and
once through with the expense of fit
ting up for the business, will find
themselves on the high road to pros
perity.
These farmers own places that are
especially adapted to dairying. Clover
or alfalfa can be grown for dry feed,
while corn, sorghum, or other stuff
suitable for ensilage can be produced
in abundance.
And once started its a safe bet that
they will stay with it. The dairy
cow is at this time about the only
more m
income producer
is bringing checks twice a month at
the rate of $1.20 for each two pounds
of cream she produces. As long as
have the creamery here it should
be made to do its best for the com
munity by being kept in continuous
operation at its full capacity. This
only be done by supplying the
we
can
plant with cream.
There is no question but that the
building of silos in this country will
become general, once the farmers
start building them. Silage is not
only the most economical feed—it is
the best feed for the dairy cow that
can be provided. Dairying will make
the most prosperous section in the
northwest. It will provide dollars
where the people now have dimes, and
put the country on a spot cash basis,
—Latah County Press.
MUST SELL WOOL
DORING DECEMBER
^GOVERNMENT WILL NOT BUY
1918 V [ 0 ^ J L n ™ I pp E p I yi^ UA
1 NO TICE
The extension department of the
University of Idaho has been notified
that the government, . which
mandeered the 1918 crop for which
I it agreed to pay a high price, will not
j accept the wool sheared last summer
1 after the end of this year. The foi
com
lowing letter has been sent out to
county agents and the executive com
mittees of all farm bureaus:
This office is just in receipt of the
following telegram from C. B. Smith,
chief, office of extension work north
and west for the U. S. department of
agriculture at Washington, D. C.
"Am advised that government will
not purchase any wool shorn during
year 1918 unless it has been loaded
on cars and billted thru to an approved
dealer in an approved distributing
center on or prior to December 31,
1918, and then only in casq, sucli ap
proved dealer filed a statement and
a copy of the invoice thereof within
five days after receipt of invoice.
Suggest you inform county agents
concerned to urge all wool growers
who have not already delivered their
wool to the government to do- so."
It will be seen from the above that
it is imperative that all persons hav
ing wool should ship immediately in
order to take advantage of' the price
established by the wool division of the
U. S. food administration.
Please see that this notice gets
wide publicity thru your local papers
and also within the communities
whereiia you reside.
Yours respectfully,
LEE W. FLUHAETY,
Director of Extension.
G. A. R. Elects Officers.
At a regular meeting of the Major
Anderson Post No. 5, G. A. R,, the
following officers were elected:
G. I. Martin* commander; Taylor
Johnston, senior vice commander;
i
r
■Hi

First Aid
0
In time of sickness or trouble, a bank account is a
source of great comfort. It is the most substantial
form of "first aid" and not hard to accumulate with
the co-operation of
m
The First National Bank
OF MOSCOW
Ü
JL
4% on Savings
J. 8. HECKATHOBN, Cashier
W. L. PAYNE, President
Theodore Clark, junior vice command
er; W. Beardsley, adjutant; Ci B,
Holt, quartermaster; C. C. Colton, of
ficer of the day; James Fogle, patri
otic instructor; J. DeWitt, surgeon;
Mr. Thurston,, chaplain; Isaac Bowers,
guard.
B )
Hotel Moscow Arrivals.,
Dec. 22.-—Wm. B. France, Pomeroy;
Mrs. Berline, Kettle Falls; G. W. Mc
Cloud, W. C. Cooper, Lewiston; G.
AV. Spray, Juiiaetta; Jay V. Carithers,
Pomeroy, Ida.; Alfred S. Anderson,
C. Shoop, John Cameron, Moscow;
Jas. W. Liezin, Ho; Wm. Burt, T. F.
Watson and wife, Inez Armstrong*
Wm. Burt, Ray Shafer and wife, Pull
man; B.. N. Emmett, Kendrick; E. M..
Dworak, Longmont, Colo.; E. S..
Doyle, Spokane; Ted Bjorn, Deary;
L. M. Thornton, Spokane; L. E. Parks*
Seattle..
Hotel Moscow Arrivals.
Dec, 20, 1918.—John R. Becker,
W. C. Coope, Lewiston; H. G. ffan
hall, C. A. Gaffney, Weippe; Chas. R.
Gates, Joliet, Ill.; Rev. R. F. Zenes,*
Potlatch; Mrs. Bryce Smith, Ellison
White Chautauqua; A. C. Shea, F,
Levin, H. Hardin, J. Berven, Spokane,
E.. B. Stevens, Seattle; Fred S. rS.1
binola, Rex Averatt, Moscow; Mrs.
J. V. Andrews, Kellogg; H. E. Blos
som, Portland; Helen Dupertins, B,
N. Emmett, Kendrick; Ester Lowery,
Pullman.
- PB -
Mrs. George Rowland went to Spo
kane to spend the Christmas holidays
with her parents.

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