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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, December 23, 1918, Image 6

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1918-12-23/ed-1/seq-6/

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CHRISTMAS
SHOPPING
at Creighton's
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m
ic
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Ic
Has been a pleasure for a great many people this
year. The good assortments of the useful wear
ables—the fair prices, the happy, courteous sales
people always ready to help and advise when nec
essary—have all combined to make buying a pleas
ure.
There's only another day before Christmas, if
you still have an unfilled want—drop in, look
around—there's still some mighty desirable good
things left.
TIES, HANDKERCHIEFS, GLOVES, HOSE,
WAISTS, ETC., ETC.
CREIGHTON'S
Store Open Until 9 Tonight and Tomorrow Night
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PRIMARY LAW WILL
DECEIVE ATTENTION
LEGISLATURE WILL AMEND
LAW IF IT IS NOT REPEALED
IS OPINION NOW
BOISE.—The next session of the
legislature will
seriouslyconsider
A Haven For 7
Late Gift Seekers
Christmas is almost here and if you haven't selected your gifts you're prob
ably worried. All worry will cease when you see our great array of gift
goods. The sight of our stock will put your mind at ease. You cannot
buy amiss because our stock contains so many sensible goods. Notwith
standing heavy sales it is still large. We bought heavily because most of
them are staple all-the-year-sellers. We'll provide splendid selections
right up to the last minute before Christmas.
has
are
Conveniences of every description for business and profession offices.
Writing Papers
Games
Playing Cards
Dictionaries
Paint Sets
Crayons
Many more—for eve
ry member of the fam
ily and every friend.
Visit the display—no
obligations to buy.
Pocket Loose Leaf
Books
Handy Boxes
Ash Trays
Stationery Racks
Book Supports
Coin Boxes
Kitchen Diaries,
Cash Boxes
Bond Boxes
Picture Frames
Calendars
Dairies
Pencils
Address Books
Lawyers' Brief Bags
Inkstands
Photo Albums
Post Card Albums
Writing Cases
Comer Drug Store
"Where Quality Counts"
BOLLES and LINDQUIST, Props.
sia.
be
to
and
changes in the direct primary law, <
which according to reports from all
parts of the state, is no longer popu
lar because of the expense involved,
the condition that requires citizens to
vote for unknown men in some cases,
vouched for by no responsible body, ;
and the difficulty of inducing a better j
grade of men to seek office because 1
of the "primary nuisance," speaking Î
broadly and without reference to any !
Dartv or candidates.
It is doubtful if the law will be
repealed as some. urge, but there is
little^doubt i^^nl^^be^^hanged^to
meet widespread objection to it in its
present form, yet without impairing
the fundamental principle,
P* an . that seems to meet gen
e f a * favor is to select delegates to a
state convention at a county primary,
j 18 contended that selection of candi
.Jp®, ar ® known to everybody
w j ^nng out a representative vote
j , se i ec t 10 P state convention
delegates would in. turn be repre
sentative of the popular will. The
convention would analyze all candi
dates for state position« and select
the best available men.
IK DRIVE US USUAL
CITY MUST DO MUCH WORK TO
RAISE ITS QUOTA OF WAR
SAVINGS STAMPS
A rush of war- savings stamp buyers
is reported at every postoffice in Latah
county and there are strong hopes now
that the county, which has been far be
hind in its quota, will "go over the top"
before New Year's day. Despite the in
fluenza epidemic which has hurt both
the Red Cross and the War Savings
drives, many communities have re
sponded liberally.
Genesee announced by telephone to
day that she is "well over the top with
more than $35,000 worth of war savings
and thrift stamps sold." Her quota could
not be learned, but she has gone far be
yond her quota.
Juliaetta was the first town in the
county to report her entire quota taken.
Potlatch, Deary and Bovill report heavy
sales and a big drive to start the day
after Christmas. Troy expects to reach
her quota tomorrow and Viola and other
smaller places report that their quotas
will be reached before the end of the
month.
Heavy sales of the stamps are being
made at .Moscow's postoffice,
been almost impossible to get to the
stamp window without having to wait
from 10 minutes to half an hour, long
lines of people being before the win
dow from opening to closing hours
Saturday and today. Postmaster
Morgareidge says he is too busy selling
stamps to make a report but he is con
fident that Moscow will reach her
quota this month and that the county's
quota of $360.000 will be taken.
The Red Cross drive is going forward
well, despite the influenza epidemic
which has hindered the work in every lo
cality. Moscow will have over 2000
members tonight and Chairman Simp
son says the county will go well
4000 members. All outside points that
have reported have sent good reports of
progress made but Mr. Simpson thinks
it will be a week before the final reports
are in from all parts of the county.
Moscow had 1945 members Saturday
night when work ceased. Today many
farmers are in town and most of them
are joining the Red Cross.
Nez Perce county, of which Lewiston
is the county seat, has taken its full
quota of war savings stamps and is
"over the top." Judge W. F. Morgar
cidge. postmaster at Moscow, is;rtied the
following statement this afternoon;
War Saving Stamp Campaign.
Genesee and Juliaetta, over the top.
Troy, Harvard, Deary, Potlatch and
Bovill, showing well.
Farthest in arrears, MOSCOW.
Good sales over the county and
people are taking interest. Many of
the prominent business men of Mos
cow have not bought a single stamp,
though many have become members
of the "Go the Limit" club.
The government is depending upon
us for this money and a letter from
the treasury department today, asks
that this entire issue be taken this
It has
over
»
SPOKANE SOLDIERS
WARN SOCIALISTS
WARN I. W. W. AGITATORS THAT
DISLOYALTY WILL NOT BE
TOLERATED
Following the speech of George
Vanderveer, the I. W. W. attorney
Chicago, at a socialist meeting at 309
Sprague avenue, last night, some 60
soldiers and sailors, home on fur
lough, all in uniform, entered the
hall, drove out those still lingering
to speak to Mr. Vanderveer, turned
out the lights and announced through
their leader :
"You fellows want to overturn the
government, do you ?
not going to
here. Just take warning. We are going
to have no more of these Sunday meet
ings.
Well,
have any bolsheviki
we are
Wonsan Upbraids Soldier.
"Send for the. police," insistently
suggested one of those present, .but
no one took his counsel and no one
else offered resistance by word or
act, filing out silently, except one slight
woman who sputtered her indignation,
saying. "The beasts; Uncle Sam has
been teaching them something." Out
side, she addressed her remarks to one
the soldiers, who started to argue
with her. "Come on, let the lady
alone," shouted a half dozen of his com
rades, to which he replied, "I wasn't
arguing. I was just explaining to her."
Soldiers Scatter Crowd.
Having accomplished their purpose
the soldiers and sailors promptly left.
Later seeing that about 50 of the crowd
remained outside the hall, discussing
their eviction, the boys returned and
scattered them.
Two returned soldiers in civilian uni
forms were present during the early
part of Vanderveer's talk, others of the
soldiers explained. Disliking his ad
herence to the bolsheviki of Russia and
attitude toward the United States,
they immediately went out, passing the
word as to what was going on and they
quickly had a large sized following.
They also said the speaker declared his
pleasure to speak here without police
interference.
Vanderveer Says Capital is Bothered.
In his speech Vanderveer said in sub
stance :
"The capitalists are facing a situa
which they know may act as it
in Russia and Germany. They are
facing a reconstruction period and are
bothered. People see clearly when they
hungry and they are hungry in Rus
"The leaven is at work here and in
another year the reactionaries who have
sitting on the safety valve will be
blown clear off. Any social ideal to
worth while must have a labor
foundation. In closing. I can only say
you to go ahead with your meetings
your literature and your talks, so
iyg
its
*WS*
[i
We
'ir
I
Ö
Are
Ready
To render you the service you want and expect,^n
shopping the day before Christmas.
'
Store Open Christmas Eve.
Clean up on Toys—all must go. Get them at
big discounts tomorrow.
We have added 36 dozen new Neckties for men
and boys. An express shipment we did not expect
before Christmas.
SILK HOSIERY in boxes. A good buy.
Heavy weight, per pair.
Medium weight, per pair
The price advances 25c a pair on these Inter
woven numbers January 1st.
$ 1.00
75c
Mufflers, Gloves, Hats, Bath Robes, etc., etc.
Some splendid good values in FURS. Special
prices for tomorrow on all Mink, Beaver, Lynx,
and Skunk Sets.
DAVID'S
that when the right time comes you will
be able to think and know what to do.'"
Answering a question as to the man
ner of defenses of the I. W. W. on trial
at Sacramento, Vanderveer said he was
too much of an attorney and consequent
iy reactionary in his views, to view with
favor any defense that did not avail it
self to the fullest extent of the technic
alities of the law. By so doing, he boast
cd, that here in Spokane he had been
able to free 100 I. W. W. from the
clutches of the immigration department.
—Spokesman-Review.
same,
L. F. Parsons v. same, $37,
in
Latah County Records.
Mtge.—James E. Long to Lettie A.
Brown, $5,750, due 11-1-26, Wl-2 SW
1-4; SE1-4 SW1-4; SW1-4 SE1-4 10
38-1 W.
Dec. 21.— R. M.—H. A. Rust to H.
H. Choat, $1000; due 6-23-21, Nl-2
Sl-2 28-41-6. *
Affidavit.— G. H. Thayer.
Rel.— R. R. Reeder to J. W. Hap
tonatall, c-m 7-16-12.
Rel.—-John O. Keefe to Geo. Camp
bell, r-m 9-19-11.
Sheriff's Deed.— W. H. Mefford et
al to Netherlands American Mortgage
Bank, $18,843.75; Sl-2 SW1-4 26;
Sl-2 SEI -4 27: NE1-4, El-2 NW1-4,
Sl-2 NW1-4, Nl-2 SW1-4 NW1-4 SE
1-4 34; Wl-2 NW1-4 36-41-6
Deed.—Estate of Ellen A. Bean to
Charles Weible, $16,000; Sl-2 NE1-4,
Nl-2 SE1-4 18-42-5. "
Mtge.—Charles Weible to N. W.
Mutual Life Ins. Co., $6,000, due—
above.
Rel. George C. Jewett to Harry M.
Dailey, r-m 4-3-13.
Attachment—Potlatch Lumber Co.,
vs. Browning Warren, $45.85; Nl-2
NW1-4, 21-39-6.
Same—Moscow Union Warehouse
Co., Ltd., v. same, $175.91, same.
Same—George O'Connor v.
$86, same. ,
Sam
same.
Same—C. B. Green v. same, $101,
same.
Assg't.—Martha T. King to A. L.
Van Tine, r-m made by David G.
Brooks, 11-29-12.
Declaration of Homestead.-—Ellen
McCoy 17-18-9 Re-Plat Moore's Mos
cow.
Mtge.—Minnie E. Kite to Mary A.
Perryman, $250, due 12-20-19; 20-3
and 15 ft. strip adjacent, in 19-3
Juliaetta.
Miss Dolly Schumacher of Sweetwa
ter, Idaho, has been visiting the past
week with her brother, Harry Schu
macher, of Miller's mill and with Mr.
and Mrs. A. C. Morgan.
Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Peterson of Blaine
are in the city shopping today.
CORN WILL PAY HERE
BETTER THAN ROOT CROPS
(Continued from page 1)
lars to the acre.
If comparisons in tho yield of the
two crops are made and we suppose
that an average yield of seven tons
of beets be secured each year, we can
safely figure that the corn crop will
average a like yield of silage. The
Great Western Sugar Refining com
pany shows that the average yields
of beets in northern Colorado under
irrigation from 1911-15 was only
12.4 tons, so that seven tons would
be very high under conditions in
northern Idaho,
When the yield of these two crops
is placed on the basis of dry matter,
seven tons of beets would amount to
about 1.75 tons of dry matter and
5.25 tons of tops would contain about
three-fourths of a ton of dry matter,
making a total of 2.6 tons of dry mat
ter from the entire beet crop. A
yield of seven tons of com silage hav
ing a fair percentage of ears would
produce approximately 36 per cent of
drv matter, or a total of 2.46 tona.
When based on dry matter produced,
if the beet tpps were «Iso untiliaed
for feed the yield from the two
would be nearly the* same.
There is little question but that the
farmer would prefer to grow corn,
when the yield of dry matter was
equal to that from beets; the cost of
production less, and the ease of hand
ling the crop ip favor of the com.
When we compare the acreage which
could be handled by the stock farmer,
the corn crop would still be favored.
The last question is that of the
yield of wheat following the two
crops. If the com were used for
silage, and it should be grown for
that purpose on the stock farm, the
crop could be removed from the field
from two to three weeks before the
beets would be ready to harvest.
There is little question but that the
beets leave the soil in excellent
dition, but the same is true with
ground if well cultivated during the
summer. The remaining com stalks
could be disked under and the crop
planted, and even if left standing
would aid in preventing winterkilling
of the wheat. If the corn were de
sired as a grain crop, the wheat
could be drilled between the rows with -
a one horsé drill as is commonly
practiced in many of the corn-belt
states.
According to experiments, conducted
by the United States department of
agriculture at Akron, Colorado, sugar
beets required 377 pounds of water to
produce 1 pound of dry matter, while
corn only required 369 pounds to pro
duce the same amount of dry matter.
Thus, the com crop would remove less
water from the soil and consequently,
more should be available to the wheat
crop following.
Some question may be raised as to
the possibility of growing corn in
Idaho, but there is little doubt as to
its success, provided the varieties or
strains are adapted to the climatic
and soil conditions in the locality. A
substitute crop of pease and oats
could be used for silage with fair
success in those localities at very high
altiitudès where corn might not be
grown.
h
/"■
crops
con
cern

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