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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, December 24, 1918, Image 2

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1918-12-24/ed-1/seq-2/

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The DAILY STAR-MIRROR
Published every evening except Sun
day, at Moscow, Idaho.
GEO. N. LAMPHERE, Publisher.
The Official Newspaper of the City of
Moscow.__
Entered as second-class matter Oct.
16, 1911, at the postoffiee of Moscow,
Idaho, under the Act of Congress of
March, 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Deliverd by carrier te any part of city :
Per Month ..
• Three Months
Six Months .
One Year —
50c
$1.60
2.76
6.00
By Mail
(outside of city and on rural routes):
^er Month . .
Three Months
Six Months
One Year . ..
40c
$1.15
2.25
4.00
The (Weekly) Idaho Post:
$1.50
Per Year
MEMBER OF ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively
entitled to the use for republication
cf all news-dispatches credited to it
•r not otherwise credited in this paper
•nd also the local news published
therein.
All rights of republication of
»fecial dispatches herein are also re
nerved.
WILSON IS RIGHT AGAIN
President Wilson is right again.
His demand that the warships sur
be not sunk, is
based on sound sense and business
judgment. It would be little short
of a crime to sink those magnificent
ships and then spend many millions
of dollars to build others like them.
It would be actual criminality to do
this.
England and the United States and
France and Italy will begin the build
ing of more warships as soon as pos
sible after the final peace treaties are
signed. That program has been defi
nitely mapped out for the United
States. This nation will have a navy
second to none in the world. Great
Britain plans to strengthen her navy,
Her Very existence depends upon her
navy and she knows it better than
•ny one else.
There are some of the finest fight- |
ing ships in the world lying in the I
harbor of the Firth of Fourth, in
Scotland. They have been surrend- 1
«red by Germany to the victorious ,
allies. The terms of surrender re
quired that every ship should be in i
first class condition and experts saw
to it that they were in that condition.
If any one can show any
reason for sinking these ships and
then spending hundreds of millions
of dollars to replace them, we want '
to hear that reason. Divide the ships !
sane
among the allied nations and let them
be put into service as were the great
ocean liners and merchant ships which
• the United States and other countries
took from Germany. It is right and
it is good business.
" * Pâ> P!»
SOLDIERS vs. SOCIALISTS.
■ There is going to be some awful
rough sledding for the socialists, who
•are really Bolshevists, believing
and advocating the same things as
their brethren in Russia, when the
The little episode
soldiers get home,
in Spokane Sunday night is just
sample of the way the soldiers feel
toward these people who are against
the government for which these men
fought and for which 58,000 of them
laid down their lives on European bat
tie fields.
New York and Spokane have had a
' taste of what the soldiers will do to
these people who advocate doctrines
that have brought misery, murder
etvery crime known to man, and suf
fering, starvation and death to hun
dreds of thousands in Russia. The
soldiers who fought the Germans in
order to maintain liberty, freedom
and prosperity here will not stand
for the advocacy of such crimes in
the United States.
The socialists, I. W.W., anarchists
and others who oppose freedom and
the present form of government ought
to take warning now, before 2,000,000
, * , „ .
more soldiers return from r ranee ana
1,800,000 are released from canton
ments in the United States. If the
bolding meetings and trying to arouse
sentiment against our government
socialists and I. W. W. agitators con
tinue. their attitude and persist in
,
,
there are going to be lynchings in
the United States and they will not
all be of negroes in the south.
ps-1 P*S P-J
MOSCOW LATE, AS USUAL.
Moscow, as usual, brings up the |
rear in the war savings stamp drive.
We have ceased to try to fathom the
■aystery of Moscow's slowness in all
such matters. She always comes un
der the wire in time, but it takes so
blamed much time it is discouraging.
Genesee, despite a terrible epidemic
of influenza raging at this time, is
oxer the top with her quota and a
good lot to spare. Juliaetta, a small
but enterprising town, was the first
In the county to raise her quota.
Deary, which has been first in sev
eral drives, is making a good record
and so is Bovill, despite the fact that
both towns are in the timber belt and
a large part of the working popu
lation left several months ago when
Hie embargo on eastern shipments of
lumber was announced. Potlatch has
almost her quota raised and will have
it all within a few days.
Why cannot Moscow "get a hump
on'* and do her duty within the next
few days ? She has only a few days
in which to escape being termed
slacker. The quota must be raised
by the evening of December 31.
Moscow raise it?
We bet she will.
Will
pe
NO PAPER CHRISTMAS DAY.
Tomorrow is Christmas and The
Star-Mirror, in common with all other
business enterprises of Moscow, will
observe the day. The office will be
closed during the day and no paper
will be issued. This is to be the great
est Christmas the world has known
and it should be observed in fitting
manner.
The Star-Mirror wishes every one
of its hundreds of patrons a Merry
Christmas and a Happy New Year.
It is thankful to them for their very
liberal patronage, which it has tried
The management is
thankful for the knowledge that the
paper has been useful to the com
munity and that through the publi
cation by it of the needs of the less
fortunate, and the liberal response by
the people of Moscow and vicinity,
no one in this section will be without
a fitting Christmas dinner and there
will be no cases of suffering here.
to deserve.
The Star-Mirror told the people of
the conditions that surrounded a few
unfortunate families and the people
showed that Christmas means some
thing more than having a good dinner
and exchanging presents among them
selves.
The Star-Mirror wants to voice the
command heard under the star of
'Peace
Bethlehem, 1918 years ago:
on Earth. Good Will to All Men.'
NO CITIZENSHIP.
The judge who denied citizenship
to foreigners because they had of
fered to surrender their claims to
citizenship rather than serve the
country as soldiers, is to be com
these men from many of the privi
leges of a free country. Such men
should not only be denied the privi
lege of becoming citizens, but they
should be sent back to the country
from which they came.—Reardan
Gazette,
books issued by the extension depart
ment of the University of Idaho,
These have been especially prepared
for the farmers and are being sold
mended in his action in thus barring
* ■ :
Every farmer should provide him
self with one of the new account
i at cost. They are especially adapted
' for keeping his accounts so that he
I can report his income for the revenue
collector. Many farmers have had to
pay heavy penalties because they had
■ not given this information correctly,
j These books may save him a heavy
j penalty.
Farmers of the Cedar Creek ridge
I district are said to be in fine condi
|
in j
!
j fact that the y are diversified farmers
I and P roduce much livestock and
; eral kinds of crops.
tion financially, largely due to the
sev
a j
J
I
The kaiser has been damned in
Idaho about as often as anything and
j
: ati11 we ' re <l u : te religions. Near-pro
I regarding the kaiser isn t regu
| lar profanity, but a species of patri
■ otic zeal.—Kootenai Valley Times.
ks kE »X
The women of Idaho who so nobly
helped in every war endeavor with
' ! right feel that they are entitled to
: some credit for having harpooned the
kaiser.—Kootenai Valley Times.
!
.
;
| Beyond the wave-washed shores of
* ranee,
Beyond the ocean's westmost tide,
Beyond the pale-blue horizon,
Are those we cherish, love and
pride.
TO YOU
j
And as our eyes see evening's sun,
„ Atl ,? ss t , h f dark ' ^fathomed blue,
Our thoughts are with the ones at
home_
| Our hearts send out our love to you.
While snows of angry winter fall,
And sheen the hills of France i
white,
While cold winds blow overhead,
in
The murkey day fades into night.
Yet, vistas bright of other years
Bring back the long-passed joys
a-new,
And as come dreams of days that
were—
Our hearts send out our love to you.
For those who face the mighty guns,
For those of us who stay behind,
For those who, fever-raiked, will lie
On beds of pain, with troubled
mind;
For those who've done their earthly
bit,
Who sleep beneath the morning's
dew;
For those that are and those that
as
wen
Our hearts send out our love to you.
While ring the bells of Christmas
tide
Throughout the land where Christ
is King,
,The phrase resound:
men!"
For peace, the sword of war will
bring. .
Our souls are rife with victory's hope,
Soon shall we cross again the blue,
\And 'til that day of days shall come—
Our hearts send out our love to you.
—Sgt. Laurence Lockney.
'Peace Unto
[NORTH IDAHO FIRE
LOSS WAS LIGHT
REPORT OF FOREST FIRES AND
FIGHTING COSTS IN PEND
D'OREILLE DISTRICT
SANDPOINT, Idaho, Dec. 23.—The
cost of fire fighting on the Pend
d'Oreille forest during 1918 was $25,
266.46, according to the annual re
port just filed by Supervisor Fitzwa
ter. The year 1918 was not a bad fire
year.
Of fires originating upon national
forest land there were 13 which oc
curred on less than a quarter acre,
12 on less than 10 acres, three where
the damage was under $100, two
where the damage amounted to be
tween $100 and $1000, and one fire
where the damage ran to over $1000.
Of fires originating on private
lands inside the forestry limits there
were three fires destroying less than
a quarter acre, five destroying 10
acres or less, two where the loss was
less than $100 and one where the loss
was from $100 to $1000.
Of fires which came from the out
side boundaries there was one con
fined to less than ten acres, one where
damage was done to the extent of
$100 and one where damage was done
to the extent of between $100 and
$1000.
Fires on the outside of the forest
boundaries but which were fought by
forest forces number five on less than
a quarter acre, two where the damage
was less than $100 and one where the
damage was over $1000. The total
fires fought by the forestry fire fight
ers thus was 64.
The origins of the fires were as
follows: By railroad, 6; by lightning,
19; incendiary, 3; brush, 18; camps,
7; unknown causes, 10; miscellaneous,
one.
Timbered acres on the forest over
which fire ran numbered 391; open,
353 acres, making a total of 744 acres
burned over. On private lands inside
the forestry the number of acres of
timber lands destroyed amounted to
115 acres, and open lands burned over
amounted to 152 acres, making a
grand total of lands burned over in
the forest of 1011 acres.
Timber destroyed or damaged be
longing to the government amounted
to 822,000 board feet valued at $2277,
while the amount destroyed on private
property within the forest was 151,
000 board feet valued at $394.
Few Escape.
There are tew indeed who escape
having at least one cold during the
winter months, and they are fortunate
who have but one and get through
with it quickly and without any seri
Take Chamber -
consequences.
ous
Iain's Cough Remedy and observe the
directions with each bottle, and you.
are likely to be one of the fortunate
The worth and merit of this
ones.
remedy has been fully proven. There
are many families who have always
used it for years when troubled with
a cough or sold and with the very
best results.
D
Engineering
and Vocational Training
Approved by U.S. Gov. Officials
The most thorough and prac
tical school in all Engineering
and Vocational Sciences—offer
ing complete courses in ONE
HALF the time usually requir
ed 1 y Universities.
Eliminat'on of non-essential
subjects; intensified course's and
indi idual instruction enables us
to effect this saving of time.
Well equipped shops, labora
tories and. field instruments.
Courses in: Civil, Electrical,
Mechanical and Mining Engin
eering, Auto - Mechanics, Ma
chine Shop, Oxy - Acetylene
Welding, Commercial and Wire
less Telegraphy.
We have fully demonstrated
that it is not necessary to spend
four years in High School and
another four years in Univer
sity before being an Engineer.
Actual engineering work done
by advanced students.
Opportunities to earn board
and lodging.
New Term Beginning Jan. 6th
Address
POLYTECHNIC COLLEGE OF
ENGINEERING
13th and Madison Sts
Oakland, Cal.
Per
$ 1,000
ACRE!
GROWING
THE ALTON IMPROVED
Red Raspberry
The greatest money-maker on rec
ord. Get my book, THE FARM
ERS KEY TO SUCCESS, only 50c,
worth $100 to any farmer. Money
back if not satisfied. Pamphlet
free.
H. A. PINEGAR
Wellington, Utah.
We will pay for Poultry, live weight
follows:
Turkeys
Ducks .
Geese ..
Chickens
30c
22c
20c
15 to 18c
See us before selling
COLD STORAGE
MARKET
Phene 7
♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
♦ MARKETS
+ ♦♦•••*♦**♦ + * + ♦* +
The following market quotations
are the prices paid to the producer
by the dealer and are changed daily,
thus giving the public the accurate
quotations in all classes of grain,
produce and meats.
Hay and Grain.
Wheat, Marquis, bulk....,
Wheat, Bluestem No. 1, bulk,
net, delivered to warehouses 2.03%
Wheat, Bluestem No. 1, sacked
net, delivered to warehouses 2.12%
Wheat, Fortyfold, No. 1, bulk
net, delivered to warehouses 2.03%
Wheat, Fortyfold, No. 1, s'k'd
net, delivered to warehouses 2.12%
Wheat, White Club, No. 1, bulk
net, delivered to warehouses 2.02%
Wheat, White Club, No. 1, s'k'd
net, delivered to warehouses 2.11%
Wheat, Red Russian, No. 1, blk
net, delivered to warehouses 1.99%
Wheat, Red Russian, No. 1 skd
net, delivered to warehouses 2.08%
No. 1 Feed Oats, sacked, per
cwt, net, delivered to ware
houses .
No. 1 Timothy Hay. .. .
White Beans, per pound
Produce.
$2.07%
3.00
$34.00
. .07%
60c
Eggs, per doz .
Butter, creamery, per lb.
Butter, ranch, per lb ....
Potatoes, per cwt.
Young ehickens, per [email protected]
Hogs, live wt., light, per lb [email protected]%
Hogs, live wt., heavy, per lb
Old roosters, per lb.
Hogs, dressed, heavy, per lb [email protected]
Hogs, dressed, light, per lb. [email protected]
65c
55c
76c
14c
8(®10c
17c
PROFESSIONAL CARDS
PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS
DR. W. A. ADAIR—Physician, Creigh
ton Blk. Phoue 85..
DR. J. N. CLARKE—Physician, New
Creighton Blk. Phone 139.
DR. C. L. GRITMAN—Physician . and
Phone 27.
surgeon, 720 So. Main.
DR. JOHN W. STEVENSON—Eye
Ear, Nose and Throat. Glasses
Fitted. Office of Dr. Aspray, 303
3rd Ave. Pho n e 177. _
DR. D. F. RAE- Physician, Brown Blk.
Phone 33J.
DR. F. M. LEU CH—Physician, Com
mercial Bldg. Phone 223Y.
DR. J. J. HERRINGTON — Office
over Willis' Drug Store. Phone 346;
Phone 187R.
OSTEOPATH
DR. W. M. HATFIELD—Osteopath,
Creighton Bldg. Phone 48.
CHIROPRACTIC
DR. ZDNA BIGGS—Chiropractic, Steele
Bldg. Phone 331H.
DENTISTS
DR. I. R. BOYD—Dentist, Creighton
Bldg. Phone 168R.
DR. H. J. SMITH—Dentist, Urquhart
Bldg. Phone 9.
DR. J. A. McDANIELS—Dentist, First
Nnt'l Bank Bldg. Phone 229.
DR T. B. McBRYDE—Dentist, Brown
Blk. Phone 33L.
DR. L. A. PHILIPS—Dentists, Skatta
hoe Bldg. Phone 14L.
LAWYERS
G. G. PICKETT—Lawyer, cor. First
and Main. Phone 2.
A. L. MORGAN—-Lawyer, Urquhart
Bldg. Phone 75.
FRANK L. MOORE—Attorney-at-law,
Commercial Blk. Phone 81.
A. H. OVERSMITH —Atttorney-at
Law, Urquhart Bldg. Phone 208.
ORLAND & LEE — Attorneys-at-Law,
First Natl. Bank Bldg. Phones Or
land 104. Lee 104L.
H. R. SMITH-—Attorney-at-Law, First
Natl. Bank Bldg., Third St. Entrance.
Phone 43 Y ,
JOHN NISBET—Attorney-at-Law, 1st
Natl. Bank Bldg. Phone 131J.
J. H. FORNEY — Attorney - at - Law,
Commercial Blk. Phone 78.
ROY O. JOHNSON—Attorney-at-Law,
Commercial Blk. Phone 81.
SUPPINGER & OGDEN — Attorneys
at-Law, New Creighton Blk. Phone,
G. W. Suppinger 83 ; Scott, Ogden
83H.
ARCHITECTS
+
C. RICHARDSON, ARCHITECT—
Skattaboe Blk., phone 200.
-i
*
FLORISTS
+
Proprietors, North *î*
SCpTT BROS
Main. Phone 289.
+
*
*
VETERINARY
•p
DR. E. T. BAKER—Assistant State
Veterinarian. Residence Sixth and
Washington, phone 243.
*
***
*
+
DR. J. D. ADAMS — Veterinary, 220
South Asbury. Phone 15Y.
AUCTIONEER
CHAS. E. WALKS—Auctioneer, Urqu
hart Blgd. Phone 278.
CREAMERY
MOSCOW CREAMERY — 62 cents
paid for butter fat. Ice cream, bulk
and brick in cold storage.
HIDES AND JUNK
HIGHEST PRICES PAID FOR
hides and junk—Moscow Hide and
Junk Co., 308 W. 6th St. Will call
city or country. Phone 252.
EXPERT PIANO TUNING
Phone 189-W
Veal, live wt., per lb
♦ Veal, dresaed, per lb. .
Spring lambs, per lb.
Mutton, per lb.
. . [email protected]
10 (3) 13c
[email protected]
*
9c
The commissions Sales Co. is pre
pared to care for all kinds of sales,
large or small. Try us. ^-Satisfaction
guaranteed. Office at the Big Bend
Store, Moscow, Idaho. 70-94
Thompson Insurance Agency
Fire Insurance, Automobile and
Plate Glass Insurance, Fidelity and
Casualty Bonds
J. 6. Vennigerhols, Prop.
■Moscow, Idaho.
FOR FIRST CLASS SHOE
REPAIRING
go to
J. N. FRIEDMAN
HARNESS SHOP
FINEST LINE OF HIGH GRADE
WOOLENS. YOUR INSPECTION
SOLICITED
O. H. SCHWARZ, Tailor.
LATAH COUNTY
TITLE & TRUST COMPANY
Abstracts of Title Conveyancing
Mortgage Losas
Victrolas and
Victor Records
Sherfey's Book Store
Moscow, Idaho
If It'» New We Are Sure the
First to Have h
Monuments
THE MOSCOW MARBLE
WORKS
George H. Moody, Proprietor
Has the finest line of Monuments
and all Kinds of Marble Work to
be found in the Inland Empire
PRICES REASONABLE
See Our Work Before Ordering
YOUR
MONEY
Draws interest whe».
deposited in this bank.
It earns nothing when
carried around in your
pocket.
!
FIRST TRUST
& SAVINGS BANK
Hotel Moscow t
TOM WRIGHT, Prop.
Thoroughly Modern
FIRST CLASS GRILL
AUTO BUS AT ALL TRAINS
X
I
You will find you save more
and live better if you trade at
the
THIRD STREET
MARKET
CHICKENS, GEESE, DUCKS
AND HIDES WANTED |
L. M. KITLEY
PHONE 248'
•^uauiBJDBg passais jsopj
aqq jo uoijaipauaq Xq paMO||Oj '08 : 0l
je ssBui qJ3iq Lui r g je sseui qsjtj
;smo|ioj su' aq ujm qaanqa Xqtuii^
Xi°h aqi saaiAjas SBUijsu'qQ
- m -
For Croup.
* "Chamberlain's Cough Remedy Is
splendid for croup," writes Mrs. Ed
ward Hassett, Frankfort, N. Y. "My
children have been quickly relieved
of attacks of this dreadful complaint
its use." This, remedy contain
no opium or other narcotic, and may
be given to a child as confidently as
to an adult.
s
D
CLASSIFIED ADS
HELP WANTED—Female
WANTED—A GIRL FOR GENERAL
housework. Call Mrs. S. L. Willis.
68tf ■
WANTED — COMPETENT MAID
for general housework. Mrs. Mark
P. Miller.
70-tf
FOR RENT—Rooms
FOR RENT —A ROOM WITH OR
without sleeping porch ; hot and cold
'■ater ; modern conveniences ; price rea
< nabe. 425 East Third St. Mrs.
quhart.
13tf
FOR RENT—FURNISHED APART
ments and furnished rooms at
Eggan's apartments. Phone 205H.
231-tf
APARTMENTS FOR RENT AT
the Idaho Hotel ; steam heat. Phone
49tf
295.
AFTER JAN. 1ST,
FOR RENT
two housekeeping rooms, first floor,
modern, 210 First St. 73tf
FOR TRADE
FOR TRADE—IMPROVED TWO
acres for small car. Phone 290R. 3M
FOR RENT—Houses
FOR RENT—FURNISHED HOUSE,
241 So. Monroe St. Enquire Mrs.
76-78
Licuallen.
FOR REASONABLE RENT—MOD
ern house, 446 Lewis street; garden
and garage. Phone 9180.
70-76
FOR RENT—FIVE ROOM HOUSE
Corner Main and Morton. Phone
1Y. J. E. Mudgett._44-tf
FOR RENT—2-ACRE TRACT WITH
5-room house, cheap. Phone 290R.
32tf
W ANTED—Miscellaneous
WANTED—GOOD LIVE DEALER
to sell the best truck on the market
Can make deliveries 1 to 5 tons. Write
Rochester Motor Co., 1012 Sprague
235-tf
Ave., Spokane, Wash.
WANTED TO RENT—AN OFFICE
desk. Telephone 362.
291-tf
FOR SALE—Real Estate
FOR SALE OR TRADE—205 ACRES
of timber land 8 miles from Moscow ;
trade for Moscow property preferred.
Call 201L, Moscow.
58*4
FOR SALE—A 6-ROOM MODERN
residence; good cellar and garage.
Phone 263H. Fred Stone.
16-tf
FOR SALE—8-ROOM MODERN
residence ; choice location, corner lot,
garage, etc. Phone 267Y, Sam Silvey.
255-tf.
FOR SALE —HOUSE AND LOT.
corner First and Polk Sts. Inquire
Mrs. Wm. Arnett.
244tf
FOR SALE—Live Stock
1 HAVE A PURE BRED HOLSTEIN
bull, originating from John L. Smith's
herd, Spokane, for service and sale at
Neely's barn; service $2.50 in advance:^
see Mr. Neely at the barn. E. J. Arm- '
bruster.
59tf
FOR SALE—Miscellaneous '
FOR SALE—JONATHAN, SPITZ
enberg and Roman Beauty Apples,
Call Farmers 9138. _ 74-79
FOR SALE—EXCELSIOR MOTOR
bicycle. Just overhauled, $25.00.
Phone 267R. _70-76
FOR SALE—ABOUT THIRTY
cords of first class four-foot red
fir wood. $9 cash delivered anywhere
in town. Order immediately as wood
is scare. Call 88.
69-tf
FOR SALE — FANCY PACKED
Wagener apples ; Burpee stringless
seed beans and Bine Persian seed peas.
Phone 201L.
57-74
JOLINE - KNIGHT 7-PASSENGER
touring car, in good condition, for sale
r trade. Moscow Auto & Supply Co.
283tf
SELDEN TRUCKS SOLD ON DE
ferred payment plan. Write Rochester
Motor Co., 1012 Sprague Ave., Spo
kane, Wash.
235-tf
LOST
LOST—ONE BULL CALF ABOUT
one year old, black with white face.
Notify Mike Mulalley, phone No. 9374.
73-78
LOST—A PACKAGE ON COAST
ing hill.
Mirror office.
Finder return to Star
74
LOST—AT SECTION B BARRACKS
a gray colored mackinaw. Finder
please call 130Y. _ 73-tf
LOST—FOUNTAIN PEN TOP AND
post office key on ribbon. Please
leave at Star-Mirror office.
U
MISCELLANEOUS
POTATOES—WE ARE ALWAYS IN
the market : car-lot quantities : we pay
cash price. Garfield Fruit & Produce *
Co., Garfield, Wash.
58tf

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