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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, December 27, 1918, Image 2

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1918-12-27/ed-1/seq-2/

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Published every evening except Sun
day, at Moscow, Idaho.
The DAILY STAR-MIRROR
GEO. N. LAMPHERE, Publisher.
The Official Newspaper of the City of
M oscow.___
Entered as second-class matter Oct.
16, 1911, at the postoffice of Moscow,
Idaho, under the Act of Congress of
March, 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Deiiverd by carrier to any part of city :
Per Month ....
Three Months ..
Six Months ....
One Year.
50c
.$1.50
. 2.75
5.00
By Mail
'outside of city and on rural routes);
**er Month ..
Three Months
Six Months
One Year ...
40c
$1.15
2.25
4.00
The (Weekly) Idaho Post:
$1.50
•Per Year
MEMBER OF ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively
«titled to the use for republication
of all news-dispatches credited to it
or not otherwise credited in this paper
ünd also the local news published
therein.
All rights of republication of
tfecial dispatches herein are also re
served.
THE MOONEY CASE.
f Thomas Mooney,
The
con
case
rsrted of murdering 10 persons
wounding 50 others by
bomb during,the preparedness
rade in
ghost, ''will not down."
and labor agitators continue to try to
make it an issue and threaten strikes
if Mooney is not released, given u new
trial, or something done witli him.
One might be inclined to pay some
attention to these demands were they
the first that bad been made by union
labor for the releuxc anti exoneration of
a murderer who happened to be a
member of a labor union. But it has
not been so many years since the Los
Angeles Times office was destroyed by
a bomb and 21 persons murdered. When
and
exploding a
lay pa
San Francisco, like Banquo's
Lalmr unions
this murder was charged to members
^ a labor union and they were arrested
labor all QYtr the United States
been
union
made the same howl that has
made in tire case of Thomas Mooney,
They declared it was a figiit of capital
and that the McNamara
against labor
brothers were benig persecuted. Vast
-v-sums of money were raised by soliciting
of
(members
the laboring people,
unions ) for donations to
from being convicted
frame-up" and the poor, gullible labor
ers dug up, believing honestly that cap
ital was making an unjust fight against
McNamara
ave labor
af crime by a
union labor and that the
-brothers were about to he 'railroaded
for a crime of which
to the gallows"
they were innocent.
But the two McNamara brothers con
fessed to the crime, gave full details,
told of the plans for blowing up the
Times building and many
ither struc
showed the records in the cases
there crimes had been ;
turcs,
ilanned and
employed by the
executed by thugs
labor unions, and after the McNamaras
for 21
had been sent to prison.
and the other for life, more than
one
years
a score of other officers
of the labor
for long terms
unions were sent up
upon the evidence furnished by the Mc
brothers, whom the average
laborer bad been led to believe
Naina ra
union
innocent.
were
eben the Bunker
It was the same
Hill & Sullivan concentrator was blown
When a bomb set off
up in this state,
by Harry Orchard in Colorado killed
■if non-union miners
at when they were changing
shifts ; when Governor Steunenherg was
murdered in Idaho and Haywood, Moy
er and Pettyhone were arrested*. Union
labor set up the howl that a fight was
"being made by capital against labor and
secured hundreds of thousands of dol
morc than a score
at a
dep
lars from honest laborers to help pay
if these murderers.
for the defense
Then Harry Orchard confessed and told
all of Ihe details and showed that these
reasonable
men were guilty, beyond a
rue, they were acquitted by
doubt.
a jury after $250.000 had been spent by
the defense at their trial, hut they were
if public opin
convicted before the bar
ion.
The trouble is that the average mem
union is too easily mis
wilhng
that hc
tier of a labor
led by the leaders and is alwa
believ
■ being persecuted. This
easy victim for the im
"walking delegate" whose
or his union art
makes him an
scrupulous
business it is to stir up strife and dis
content, otherwise he would be out of
By making the union member
a job.
believe this rot the leaders are able to
collect vast sums from them to "fight
for our rights" and the money goes in
fees to unscrupulous
paying enormous
lawyers or paying salaries to these tron
ble makers.
Mooney was prosecuted by a district
attorney elected three times by the
labor vote and one who had al
He was
union
ways fought for union labor.
tried and convicted in the strongest
union city in the world, San Francisco,
not because hc was a member of the
union, but because the evidence showed
him to be guilty.
The agitation for a new trial ; the
"charges that Mooney was "framed by
and all such rot
writer, who has championed every dyna
miter from Orchard, Haywood, the
McNamaras and on down the list, and
b as charged that their prosecution was
a "frame-up" against union labor. Older
is a professional labor agitator and is
making capital out of the Mooney
recently been indicted for
He has
criminal libel.
ca m n
WE NEED BETTER ROADS.
One of the great problems confronting
the American people now is to get back
to normal conditions aftci having been
on a war basis so long and so thorough
From five to ten
he released from the employment they
have had, soldiering, ship-building, ma
king guns or ammunition, building air
planes and other work that belongs ex
clusively to war. These men must have
employment in other lines. We cannot
afford to have several million idle men
in the United States. We must keep
them busy for "Satan finds sonic mis
chief still for idle hands to do.''
these men are not given profitable em
ployment by which they can earn a live
lihood
as are being
soldiers
no employment and nc
start revolutionary movements.
The federal government is urging
million men will
ly.
f
may look for such scenes
acted in Europe where
return to their homes to find
food and they
the states, countries and commonwealths
everywhere to start some kind of work
that will furnish employment for these
men. In the west the building of roads_
si being advocated. Tt should become
popular. If Idaho would raise by pop
ular subscription as much money
she has given to the Red Cross and
other organizations for the relief of the
soldiers and invest it in good roads, em
ploying men thrown out of employment
by the ending of the war to do tue
wprk, it would be one of the liest invest
ment the state ever made.
If Latah county were to raise as much
money for road building as she has rais
ed for the organizations mentioned and
expend it wisely, it would mean much
to the county and every town in it. Let
ns give this matter careful consideration.
cork for nib who want
as
There must be
it.
ALL THE EDITOR HAS TO DO.
Most any man can be an editor, says
the town knocker.
All the editor has to do is to sit at a
desk six days a week and "edit" such
Mrs. Jones of Cactus Creek let a can
stuff as this :
opener slip last week and cut herself in
the pantry.
v t • , , „r
A mischievous lad of Piketown threw a
, ,, .
stone and cut Mr. Pike m -the alley last
wee k
Joe Doe climbed on the roof of his
house last week looking for a leak and
fell, striking himself on the back porch,
escorting
While Harold Green was
Miss Violet Wise from the church social
attack
ed them and Hit Mr. Green on the puli
lie square.
Tsiah Trimmer of Running Creek w.v
playing with a cat Friday when
scratched him on the veranda.
Mr. Frank, while harnessing a broncho
last Saturday, was kicked just south
his corn crib.—Exchange.
r- ip».
Irish leaders ask for a seat at
peace table and want to settle he Irish
question there. Impossible. Winston
Churchill has made a fair proposition
to the Irish people by telling them that
"whenever the Irish people agree
the kind of a government they want,
England will give it to them." There
is too much truth in the old saying that
"where there are two Irishmen there
a row and where there are three there
is a riot." Let the Irish people agree
among themselves what kind of a gov
ernment they want before they ask the
world lo help them get it.
P* IB« »
Chief of Police Stillinger is to be
commended for having provided the
young folks a place to coast by fencing
off a portion of First street and guard
ing it so that there will he no danger
of teams or automobiles getting in the
way of the coasters. This is healthful
sport and the young people are enjoy
it immensely and, with the street
mg
fenced off and guarded as at present,
there is almost no danger. This action
by the chief is appreciated by parents
ns well as the young folks.
an
INFLUENZA IS BAD
IN ILLINOIS TOWN
James Bumgarner, of Moscow, is in
receipt of a letter from his son-in-
law, a physician at Aurora, Illinois,
telling of the influenza situation
there. He says the number of deaths
there has been appalling and that the
doctors are unable to attend to all
of the cases. The deaths have been
averaging about six daily and the un-
dertakers are unable to bury the dead
as fast as they die. One undertaker
had 16 bodies in his establishment at
one time, awaiting burial.
-Si « -
Pan Hawks of Midvale, Idaho, is
visiting his aunt and uncle, Mr. and
Mrs. J. T. Wood, of Moscow.
iVt-ij— "i-r** 1 ( A)
VniUKD FILL«, for tt
RtliaM«
German Atrocities Continue to j
the End.
World's Biggest Whistle
Can Be Heard 12 Miles
Pittsburgh, Pa.—What Is said
to be the largest whistle in the
world has been placed on one of
the smokestacks of the Home
stead Steel works. The whistle,
200 feet above the ground, Is
five feet long and one foot in
diameter and Is connected with
a three-inch steam pipe. It re
quires 150 pounds of steam to
blow the whistle, which can be
heard 12 miles.
ARE DEVILISH TO FINISH
1
I
_ . .. ,, ... . ., !
Retreating Huns Show Ingenuity in |
Devising Infernal Ma
!
j
(
chines.
With the Britlsh-American Armies.
—German deviltry seemed to know no !
bounds in the last days *f fighting on
the British front, after the Hinden
bnrg line had been shattered. They
attached grenades to the bodies of
dead Huns left behind in the German
retreat, so that when the bodies were
lifted the grenades exploded, killing
or wounding the bearers.
Near the town of Le Cateau, a num
ber of Australian stretcher bearers
were killed by these grenades In at
tempting to remove some German
dead from the field froni In front
of an American machine-gun position.
Thereafter, no Australian would put
hand on a dead German. In some
cases the bodies were dragged to their
Ijurlal places by means of a iQng
rope, which allotted fhe stretch«??
bearers TcT Tteep of riiugo pf any
exploding han d grenades!" —
The Americans, on the other hand,
hit upon a [dan of making the Ger
man prisoners bury their
In one ijjstmice, a Boche prisoner Whs
Summarily shot because he refused to
remove the body of one of his dead
companions. An examination of the
body later led to the discovery that
it was mined. The German was aware
of this fact and refused to touch it.
In one small town evacuated by the
Germans, many of the beds werd
found to be mined. An American offl-i
cer, tired and worn by hard fighting,
sought rest on a lounge in a room pre
viously occupied by a German officer.
The lounge blew up and he was in
stantly killed.
, - _ ... « , .
Another officer picked up a pair of
, J ,, ,1
field glasses, left by the Germans, and
, ldJustIng the foeU8 when the
glasses exploded in his hands and
blew away part of his face.
nefarious business of making Infernal
machines, mines and time fuses, and
The Huns had become adept in the
Hiere was scarcely an area where the
electrical and engineering experts of
the allies did not find some, new form
i
i'
o';
1 of their fiendish Ingenuity.
TOOK 375 HUNS
ss
m
the'
on
is
W
, 'j
;ÏSSÏPh«o bjr «tlÄiSjKäS
[weiUrn Newtpiper Union
An example of the supremacy of
American valor over that of the Hun
is shown by the feat of this Yank,
Sergt. Harry T. Adame, who distin
guished himself In a cleanup in the
salient of St. Mihiel by capturing 875
German prisoners with only firing
two shots. The Germans without
doubt were so frightened by the Amer
ican manner of fighting, that of stop
ping for nothing, that they all surren
dered in a bunch.
FUEL OIL KILLS SEAGULLS
Stick Fast in Fluid From Wrecked
Steamer and Starve to
Death.
Seattle, Wash.—Thousands of dead
seagulls soaked with fuel oil strew the
waters of Lynn canal ne; r the wreck
of the steamship Princess Sophia, ac
cording to steamship captains arrlv
tfaien the Princess Sophia
was swept on the rocks o; Vanderbilt
reef her fuel oil tanks bur-f, releasing
the oil, which soon covered the water
for a great distance. The culls a ight
Ing in the water were Instantly made
helpIeW end soon starved to death.
he
Kisses at $35 Per.
Macon. Ôa. —A. C. Freeman paid $35
for a Idea from Miss Halbe Manning
and declared the oscnlatiou was worth
It Fre em an and an army officer bid
for the kissing privilege ah 1 the price
*
MARKETS
+
The following market quotations
* are the prices paid to the producer
1 by the dealer and are changed daily,
j thus giving the public the accurate
j quotations in all classes of grain,
!■ produce and meats.
Hay and Grain.
Wheat, Marquis, bulk.
Wheat, Bluestem No. 1, bulk,
net, delivered to warehouses 2.03%
Wheat, Bluestem No. 1, sacked
net, delivered to warehouses 2.12%
Wheat, Fortyfold, No. 1, bulk
net, delivered to warehouses 2.03%
Wheat, Fortyfold, No. 1, s'k'd
net, delivered to warehouses 2.12%
Wheat, White Club, No. 1, bulk
net, delivered to warehouses 2.02%
Wheat, White Club, No. 1, s'k'd
net, delivered to warehouses 2.11%
Wheat, Red Russian, No. 1, blk
net, delivered to warehouses 1.99%
W'heat, Red Russian, No. 1 skd
net, delivered to warehouses 2.08%
No. 1 Feed Oats, sacked, per
cwt, net, delivered to ware
No. 1 Timothy Hay
$2.07%
3.00
$34.00
. .07%
White Beans, per pound
Produce.
60c
Eggs, per doz .
Butter, creamery, per lb.
Butter ; ranch> lb
65c
55c
75c
Potatoes, per cwt.
'Young ahickens, per lb....
Hogs, live wt., light, per lb.
Hogs, live wt., heavy, per lb
Old Roosters, per lb.
Hogs, dressed, heavy, per lb [email protected]
Hogs, dressed, light, per lb. [email protected]
. ,[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
15c
14c
8c
Veal, live wt., per lb
Veal, dressed, per lb. .
I
Spring lambs, per lb.
Mutton, per lb.
9c
[email protected]
PROFESSIONAL CARDS
PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS
DM. W. A. ADAIR—Physician, Creigh
ton Blk. Phone 85.
DR. J. N. CLARKE—Physician, New
Creighton Blk, Phone 139.
DR. C. L. GRITMAN—Physician and
surgeon. 720 So. Main. Phone 27.
DR. JOHN W. STEVENSON—Eye
Ear, Nose and Throat. Glasses
Fitted. Office of Dr. Aspray, 303
3rd Ave. Pho n e 177. _
DR. D. F. RAE- Physician, Brown Blk,
Phone 33J.
DR. F. M. LEITCH—Physician, Com
mercial Bldg. Phone 223Y.
DR. J. J. HERRINGTON — Office
over Willis' Drug Store. Phone 346;
Phone 187R.
OSTEOPATH
DR. W. M. HATFIELD—Osteopath,
Creighton Bldg. Phone 48.
CHIROPRACTIC
DR. ZONA BIGGS—Chiropractic, Steele
Bldg. Phone 331H.
.
, —
__ .
i BOND Dentist, Creighton
1 Hc " Phone 168R '
DENTISTS
j DR. H. J. SMITH—Dentist, Urquhart
Bldg. Phone 9.
DR. J. A. McDANIELS—Dentist, First
Nat'l Bank Bldg. Phone 229,
DR. T. R. McBRYDE—Dentist, Brown
Blk. Phone 33L.
DR. L. A. PHILIPS—Dentists, Skatta
boe Bldg. Phone 14L.
(
LAWYERS
i G. G. PICKETT—Lawyer, cor. First
and Main. Phone 2,
A. L. MORGAN—Lawyer, Urquhart
Bldg, Phone 75.
FRANK L. MOORE—Attorney-at-law,
Commercial Blk. Phone 81.
A. H. OVERSMITPI — Atttorney-at
Law, LTrquhart Bldg. Phone 208.
ORLAND & LEE — Attorneys-at-Law,
First Natl. Bank Bldg. Phones Or
land 104, Lee 104L.
H. R. SMITH—Attorney-at-Law, First
Natl. Bank Bldg., Third St. Entrance.
Phone 43Y,
JOHN NISBET—Attorney-at-Law, 1st
Natl. Bank Bldg. Phone 131J.
J. H. FORNEY — Attorney - at - Law,
Commercial Blk. Phone 78.
ROY O. JOHNSON—Attorney-at-Law,
Commercial Blk, Phone 81.
SUPPINGER & OGDEN
at-Law, New Creighton Blk. Phone,
G. W. Suppinger 83 ; Scott, Ogden
83H.
Attorneys
ARCHITECTS
C. RICHARDSON, ARCHITECT
Skattaboe Blk., phone 200,
FLORISTS
SÇfJTT BROS — Proprietors, North
VETERINARY
DR. E. T. BAKER—Assistant State
Veterinarian. Residence Sixth and
Washington, phone 243.
DR J. D. ADAMS —Veterinary, 220
South Asbnry. Phone ISY.
AUCTIONEER
CHAS. E. WALKS—Auctioneer, Urqu
hart Blgd. Phone 278.
CREAMERY
MOSCOW CREAMERY — 62 cents
paid for butter fat. Ice cream, bulk
and brick in cold storage.
HIDES AND JUNK
HIGHEST PRICES PAID FOR
hides and junk—Moscow Hide and
Junk Co., 308 W. 6th St. Will call
city or country. Phone 262.
EXPERT PIANO TUNING
The commissions Sales Co. is pre
pared to care for all kinds of sales,
large or small. Try us. Satisfaction
guaranteed. Office at the Big Bend
Store, Moscow, Idaho. 70-94
LATAH COUNTY
TITLE & TRUST COMPANY
Abstracts of Title Conveyancing
Mortgage Loans
I
Per .
$ 1,000
ACRE!
GROWING
THE ALTON IMPROVED
Red Raspberry
!
The greatest money-maker on rec
ord.
ERS KEY TO SUCCESS, only 50c,
Get my book, THE FARM
worth $100 to any farmer. Money
back if not satisfied. Pamphlet
free.
H. A. PINEGAR
Wellington, Utah.
Thompson Insurance Agency
Fire Insurance, Automobile and
Plate Glass Insurance, Fidelity and
Casualty Bonds
J. G. V ennigerholz. Prop.
Moscow, Idaho.
FOR FIRST CLASS SHOE
REPAIRING
go ts
J. N. FRIEDMAN
HARNESS SHOP
FINEST LINE OF HIGH GRADE
WOOLENS. YOUR INSPECTION
SOLICITED
O. H. SCHWARZ, Tailor.
Victrolas and
Victor Records
Sherfey's Book Store
Moscow, Idaho
If It's New We Are Sure the
First to Have It
Monuments
THE MOSCOW MARBI.F
WORKS
George H. Moody, Proprietor
Has the finest line of Monuments
and all Kinds of Marble Work to
be found in the Inland Empire
PRICES REASONABLE
See Our Work Before Ordering
YOUR
MONEY
Draws interest whe>
deposited in this bank.
It earns nothing when
carried around in your j
pocket.
;
FIRST TRUST
& SAVINGS BANK
Î
*
Hotel Moscow
*
+ '
+
TOM WRIGHT, Prop.
*
*
*
*
Thoroughly Modern
*
4*
FIRST CLASS GRILL
*1* AUTO BUS AT ALL TRAINS I !
*
*
j
j
. You will find you save more
and live better if you trade at
the
THIRD STREET
MARKET
CHICKENS. GEESE, DUCKS
AND HIDES WANTED
L. M. KITLEY
PHONE 248
Read The Daily Star-Mirror "Want
Ads.''
CLASSIFIED ADS
HELP WANTED—Female
WANTED—A GIRL FOR GENERAL,
housework. Call Mrs. S. Willis.
6Stf
WANTED — COMPETENT MAID
for general housework. Mrs. Mark
70-tf
P. Miller.
FOR RENT—Rooms
FOR RENT —A ROOM WITH OR
without sleeping porch ; hot and cold
•vater ; modern conveniences ; price rea
i nabe. 425 East Third St. Mrs. 1>:
quhart.
13tf
FOR RENT—FURNISHED APART
ments and, furnished rooms at
Eggan's apartments. Phone 205H.
231-tf
APARTMENTS FOR RENT AT'
the Idaho Hotel; steam heat. Phone
295.
49tf
FOR RENT
two housekeeping rooms, first floor,
modern, 210 First St.
AFTER JAN. 1ST,
73tf
FOR RENT—Houses
FOR RENT—FURNISHED HOUSE,,
241 So. Monroe St. Enquire Mrs.
Lieuallen. 76-78
FOR REASONABLE RENT— MOD
ern house, 446 Lewis street; garden
and garage. Phone 9180.
70-76
FOR RENT—FIVE ROOM HOUSE
Corner Main and Morton. Phone
1Y. J. E. Mudgett._44-tf
WANTED—Miscellaneous
WANTED—GOOD LIVE DEALER
to sell the best truck on the market
Can make deliveries 1 to 5 tons. Write
Rochester Motor Co., 1012 Sprague
Ave.. Spokane, Wash.
235-t*
WANTED TO RENT—AN OFFICE
desk. Telephone 362.
291-tf
FOR SALE—Real Estate
FOR SALE OR TRADE—205 ACRES.
of timber land 8 miles from Moscow"
trade for Moscow property preferred'..
Call 201L, Moscow.
58tf
FOR SALE—A 5-ROOM MODERN
residence; good cellar and garage.
16-tf
Phone 263H. Fred Stone.
FOR SALE—8-ROOM MODERN
residence ; choice location, corner lot
garage, etc. Phone 267Y. Sam Silvejt
255-tt
HOUSE AND LOT.
corner First and Polk Sts. Inquire
244tf
FOR SALE
Mrs. Wm. Arnett.
FOR SALE—Live Stock
HAVE A PURE BRED HOLSTEIN
bull, originating from John L.'SjHiith's
herd, Spokane, for service and sale at
Neely's barn; service $2.50 in advance;
see Mr. Neely at the barn. E. J. Arm
brusten 59tf '
FOR SALE—Miscellaneous
FOR SALE.—J. I. CASE 28-INCH
Threshing Machine Outfit. Phone
899X4. _76-101
FOR SALE—JONATHAN, SPITZ
enberg and Roman Beauty Apples.
Call Farmers 9138.
74-79
FOR SALE—A BOUT THIRTY
cords of first class four-foot red
fir wood. $9 cash delivered anywhere
town. Order immediately as wood
scare. Call 88.
69-tf
JOLINE - KNIGHT 7-PASSENGER
touring car. in good condition, lor sale
r trade. Moscow Auto & Supply Co.
283tf
SELDEN TRUCKS SOLD ON DE- '
(erred payment plan. Write Rochester
Motor Co., 1012 Sprague Ave., Spo
235-tf
«
kane. Wash.
LOST
LOST—ONE BULL CALF ABOUT
one year old, black with white face.
Notify Mike Mulalley, phone No. 9374.
73-78
LOST—AT SECTION B BARRACKS
Finder
73-tf
a gray colored mackinaw,
please call 130Y.
MISCELLANEOUS
POTATOES—WE ARE ALWAYS IN
the market; car-lot quantities; we pay
cash price. Garfield Fruit St Produce
Co., Garfield, Wash.
58tf
THE MARK P. MILLER FEED
Yard will open Jan. 1st. Farmers
anyone havmç teams will be cared
for and prices right. Hay and grain *
$1.00. Standing team $15c. A nice
warm place and a warm office. Joe
Rivers. Prop. _ 76-81
or
SALESMAN WANTED FOR Sub
scription work on Western Farmer.
Steady salaried position. Men with
conveyance and selling experi
own

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