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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, December 28, 1918, Image 1

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The Daily Star-Mirror
___ MOSCOW, LATAH COUNTY. IDAHO SATURD AY, DECEMBER 28, 1918
RESIDENT WILSON MAKES EPOCHAL SPEECH
OLUME VIII
NUMBER 77
il^M'resident Wilson, the first American president to visit England, spoke
in the historic Guild Hall to an enormous crowd which cheered his
^■terances with which they all appeared to agree. His speech was epochal
in it he outlined the principles upon which he believes the future peace
^>f the world must be established. It has been an eventful day in the making
of history for the United States.
The returns from the election held two weeks ago today are being counted
throughout the British empire and they show that Lloyd George has been
victorious, his administration being upheld by an overwhelming majority.
He goes' into the world peace conference with the solid and undivided support
of his nation which gives him added strength in that important meeting.
Thqt President Wilson will not return to the United States within six
weeks as was planned when he left New York is intimated in a dispatch
from Paris which states that the president plans to visit King Albert, of
Belgium, at Brussells at the end of January.
The Bolshevists still threaten Lithuania and Polish troops are to be sent
tcu*ssist in fighting them and have notified the Germans in control of Polish
railroads that they intend to use those roads for the transportation of troops.
Following are the cable and telegraphic reports received today:
President Wilson Speaks in Guild Hall.
LONDON.—Speaking today in the historic Guild Hall at a ceremonious
gathering of Great Britain's most distinguished statesmen. President Wilson
reaffirmed the principle that there must no longer be a balance of power
which might unsettle the world's peace, but that the future must produce
a concert of action which will preserve it.
The president's reception at the Guild hall was spontaneous and hearty.
When he arose to speak there were prolonged outbursts and hand clapping
and cheering. His talk was frequently punctuated by applause. At the
conclusion of his speech the audience arose and cheered and continued the
applause and cheering as he passed out.
Some of the points of the speech which won renewed applause were the
tribute to the armies of the associated governments and the declarations
that the people throughout the world wanted peace—wanted it immediately
—not by conquest but by agreement of mind.
The concert to come, he declared, must not be the balance of power or one
group of nations set off against another group, but a "single, overwhelming
and powerful group of nations which shall be trustees of the peace of the
world."
«
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(
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"Whereas it had been thought of by closeted students and academic men,
now the world's practical minds are determined to get it. I am particularly
happy that the ground has been cleared and the foundations laid," he con
tinued, "because we already accepted the same body of principles. Those
principles have been clearly and definitely stated to make their application
a matter which should afford no fundamental difficulty."
President Wilson concluded his address amid a great demonstration and
then proceeded to luncheon at the mansion house with the lord mayor. The
procession from Buckingham palace to Guild hall was through a crowd that
cheered continuously.
President Will Visit Belgium's King.
PARIS.—President Wilson's trip to Belgium, including a visit to Brussels
as the guest of Kng Albert, probably will be deferred until the end of
January, it developed today.
*
Lloyd George Wins English Elections.
LONDON.—Election returns received up to 12:30 today favored the coali
tion government. The returns showed that the coalitionists had returned
108, unionists, 3; liberals, 1; labor, 16; Irish nationalists, 1; Sinn Fein, 26;
independent, 1.
Arthur Henderson, leader of the British labor party and former member
of the war cabinet, was defeated for reelection to parliament from the south
At 1:30 the returns showed coalition unionists, 127; coalition liberals, 56;
unionists, 5; liberals, 2; labor, 23; Irish nationalists, 1; Sinn Fein, 26; inde
pendent, 1.
The indications at 3 o'clock this afternoon are that Premier Lloyd George
and his government would have an- overwhelming majority in the hew house
of commons. Lloyd George has been reelected to his seat from Carnarvon,
Wales. Herbert H. Asquith, former premier and leader of the liberal party,
was defeated for a seat in the house of commons from the east division of
Fife, Scotland.
Coalitionists Have Big Majority.
LONDON, via Montreal. Election returns, at 4 o'clock this afternoon show
the following elected; Coalitionists, 396; non-coalitionists, 144.
Bolshevists Threaten Lithuania.
LONDON.—Vilna, the capital of Lithuania, is threatened by the advance
of the Bolshevist troops, according to a Warsaw dispatch to The Mail. The
Polish chief of staff has demanded free passage for Polish troop trains
over the lines now in German hands from the Polish frontier to Vilna.
Japs Will Withdraw From Siberia.
HONOLULU.— A Tokio cable to the Nippo Jifi here says that the Janan
department has announced that half of the Japanese troops in
<0
war
>ria will be withdrawn soon.
Si
tl
GO TO Gar SITS
HERBERT HOOVER
FOOD ADMINISTRATOR TELLS
GERMANS WHO STARVED BEL
GIUM WHERE TO GO
WASHINGTON.— (By Associated
Press.)—Food Administrator Hoover,
in Europe, arranging relief for the
people of the war devastated terntor
ies, has refused in emphatic terms to
discuss German food conditions with
Baron von Der Lancken and Dr.Eiefh,
who sought a meeting with the food
administrator.
A message from Paris today said
these two German officials, who were
prominent in the German administra
tion of Belgium, wired from Berlin to
Walter Lyman Brown, director of the
commission for relief in Belgium, at
Rotterdam, that they had been ap
pointed by. the German government
to negotiate with Mr. Hoover for food
•supplies and that they desired Mr.
Hoover to advise them when and
where he would meet them.
In answer to the request for a con
ference Mr. Hoover sent this message :
"You can describe two and a half
years of arrogance toward ourselves
and cruelty to the Belgians in any
language you may select, and tell the
pair personally to go to hell, with my
compliments. If I do have to deal
with Germans it will not be with that
r
~
pair.
CEDAR CREEK RIDGE '
FARMERS WANT GOOD ROADS
- I
A petition signed by 44 land owners
in the Cedar creek section, and rep
resenting taxable property valued at
$263,213 Will be presented to the coun
ty commissioners asking for the for
i
mation of a bonding district to vote
bonds for the purpose of building a
hard surfaced road from that section
to Kendrick. The petition is in the
hands of A. H. Oversmith, the well
known attorney and republican leader.
It will bp presented to the board at
its next meeting. Such a road will
be of inestimable value to the section
through which it passes and will add
several dollars per acre to every farm
adjacent to it. This is the district
that Mr. Fletcher, county agent, said
is among the most prosperous and
progressive he has visited. The ac
tion just taken shows that Mr. Fletch
er was not mistaken in his estimate
r . A , ^ . ,
j of the district and the farmers who
I live there.
-•-
j IDAHO SUPERINTENDENTS
IN SESSION AT BOISE
BOISE, Idaho, Dec. 27.—Idaho's
system for grade and high schools is
to be revised and reconstructed at a
conference of county superintendents
and school principals which will be
held here today and tomorrow. »The
special object of the conference is a
rearrangement of the public school
curriculum so that it will meet the
needs of the reconstruction days
which will follow the signing of the
peace conference.
Special plans .also will be discussed
for vocational training for teachers,
which will coincide with the annual
meeting of the State Teachers' associ
ation. Recommendations for neces
sary new school legislation will be
framed for submission to the state
legislature when the biennial session
of that body opens on January 6.
Urspline Academy to Reopen.
School will reopen at Ursuline ac
ademy on Monday, January 6, the
date set for opening the public
schools of Moscow. This school has (
been closed since October 23. Patrons
will be glad to know that the excel- I
lent school is to be reopened, for it
lias been doing some splendid work.
EIGHT MOSCOW BOYS
RETURNED HOME' TODAY
Out of the 73 boys who left Moscow
last September to join the service,
eight returned today. The boys # be
long to the coast artillery division
and are glad to get back home.
They have been to Camp Lewis,
Camp Eustice, Virginia, and a few
days at Camp Dodge, Iowa. Those
returning today are:
Robert Cay, Henry Gilbertson,
Henry Weinman, Elza Griffith, Mos
cow; John Snoen, Troy; Melvin Kim
berling, Juliaetta; Eddie Galloway,
Lloyd Waltz, Kendrick; Theo. Sundell
of Troy and others are expected to
morrow.
MILL FEED PRICE
COMPLAINT THAT INCREASE OF
$6 PER TON WILL HURT LIVE
STOCK INDUSTRY
Mill feed mounted to an additional
six dollars a ton this week when mills
were released by government orders
from the further observance of price
fixing. Within twenty-four, hours
after this order was published mill
feed advanced from $30 to $36 a ton
and vast quantities of this feed which
a short time before was said to be
'short, immediately became available.
The advance in mill feed will fall
heavily upon the men engaged in the
raising of young stock and the dairy
men of the entire state.
The price of flour remains un
changed and so far the order has
been of benefit only to the mill men.
There was talk to the effect that if
the price of bran and shorts went up
that flour would come down. Since
the order and the new prices have
gone into effect, the mill men state
that the price of bran and shorts were
priced too low compared with other
feed and that the raise in price is
what any one could have expected.
During the past twelve months, the
farmers say that everything has been
done that could be done to kill off
the stock industry with the possible
exception of this new price on bran
and shorts. Under the old milling
system during the period of the war,
the majority of the bran and shorts
went into the flour and there was
little of this feed available at any
price Since the war has ceased, a
better grade of flour is being manu- |
factured and a large quantity of this
mill feed was on hand. To dispose
of this at a profit and give the millers
chance to set the price on this feed
was the principal reason why the or
der was issued by Hoover and it was
not issued for the purpose of mak
ing cheaper bread for the people,
Many of the farmers insist that mill
feed at $36 a ton is too high priced
a feed to use in feeding calves to
sell from 9 to 11 cents on the Spo
kane market.
There are only a few hogs raised
in the county and the price of the
mill feed will affect them very little.
It will require five years to bring
the hog industry back to where it
was two years ago.—Colfax Com
moner. >.
DR. BAKER SAYS PEA
STRAW BAD FOR HORSES
Dr. E. T. Baker, of Moscow, assist
ant state veterinarian for Idaho, was
in Palouse for a short time Tuesday,
in company with Mrs. Baker, on their
way up the river for a few days' out
ing, the doctor intending to make use
of the time to do a little hunting for
big game. Dr. Baker was in his
young days engaged in the printing
business, having learned the printers'
trade in Pennsylvania in the office of
a brother of the writer. He has been
assistant state veterinarian of Idaho
for the past six years, and is one of
the successful men of the Inland Em
pire in his line. <
He informs The Republic that the
past fall has seen much sickness
among horses, many animals having
been lost. The trouble is Vnostly with
the digestive organs, and it is his
opinion that it is largely due to_ feed
ing the horses pea straw, which is
plentiful in the Moscow district. He
states that the straw makes good feed
for cows and sheep, but is bad for
horses.—Palouse Republic.
□t
The Collector
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KAISER'S CYCLONE
CELLAR IS FOUND
ALL HIGHEST AND VON HIND
ENBERG BURROWED UNDER
GROUND LIKE RABBITS
SPA, BELGIUM, Dec. 27.—The
former headquarters of the kaiser and
his general staff is disclosing some
extraordinary . queer facts these days
about the men who engineered the
world war.
Take, for one, Hindenburg, Ger
many's superman, about whom reams
have been written, disclosing him as
a fearless Napoleon. As a matter of
fact he spent a great deal of his time
in a wonderfully constructed "funk
hole" or dugout underneath the
grounds of his villa here.
Spa is- so far from where battle
.lines used to be that it was almost
a day's journey in a fast motor car
to get within sound of the big guns.
The kaiser, too, had a similar hiding
place at Neubois, near a comic opera
trench system about which he is said
to have paraded for the benefit of mo
tion pictures. At each of their villas
there were delicate electrical instru
ments which would set up a furious
buzzing whenever an airplane ap
proached anywhere near. At the first
sound from this contrivance Hinden
burg and the kaiser used to run to
shelter, it is reported. People who
worked about Hindenburg's establish
ment said that he was continually
running for cover.
America's representatives on the
international armistice commission
are now occupying Hindenburg's
headquarters and they were amazed
when they discovered this under
ground refuge of the great warrior.
The entrance was through the dining
room. From there a flight of steps led
down to a tiled ante-room which now
serves as a very good pantry for the
Americans.
From the tiled room there was an
other flight of steps that led down to
the real dugout. This .was blocked,
by a huge iron door about one inch
in thickness, which could be locked
from the inside only. Within it was
fastened by a double bolt which would
do credit to an American banking es
tablishment. The dugout itself was
luxuriously equipped. .
The emperor's dugout was similar
except that it was much deeper under
ground and there were two entrances,
one through the villa and the other
from the grounds. The mam entrance
was from the house and led down a
long flight of steps,
Another touch to the picture was
added today when a German resident
of Aix-la-Chapelle told the corre
spondent of the Associated Press that
the crown prince spent virtually all
his time in amusement,
MOSCOW BOY WAS
AN AIRPLANE OBSERVER
Howard Staples, who returned sev
eral days ago from Fort Sill, Okla
homa, has had some experiences in
flying. For six weeks before he re
turned home he held the position of
observer, whose duties are to photo
graph and sketch the country, direct
artillery fire, etc., the pilot attending
to the motor.
The planes were fitted with Curtis
J. N. 6 motors at that time but are
being refitted with De Haviland 4's,
with liberty twelve cylinder engines,
which have about 400 horse power.
Howard has been up 8000 feet but
says the sensation of flying is dis
appointing, as it is all quite common
place and not thrilling as most people
think.
He witnessed a plane catching fire
at 2000 feet elevation, but which des-
cended safely, both pilot and observer
escaping uninjured.
- m -
George W. Freeman, who was re
cently discharged from the army at
Fort Warden, near Seattle, arrived
in Moscow last night for a brief visit
with his brother, Charles Freeman,
linotype operator in The Star-Mirror
office, and his mother,. Mrs. Sqrah
Savage, of Pendleton, who is visiting
at the home of her son, Charles Free
man. George left this afternoon for
Seattle, where he has a position with
the Stewart & Holmes wholesale drug
company.
j
I LYON FAMILY HAD A
REUNION ON CHRISTMAS
Mr. and Mrs. Hiram Lyon enter
! tained at Christmas dinner, at their
home two miles southeast of Moscow,
their daughter, Mrs. C. E. Hart and
daughter, Dorothea of Libby, Mont.,
Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Hart and children
and Mrs. Hart's mother, Mrs. Mathis
of Moscow; Mr. and Mrs. Otha Lyon
and childi'en; Mr. and Mrs. Otis Lyon;
Mrs. E. G. Pbtter and Mrs. and Mrs.
IJoyd Lyon.
A very enjoyable evening was spent
with music and distribution of pres
ents from the tree.
All of Mr. and Mrs. Hiram Lyon's
children were present except Mrs.
Loren Collett, who lives at Burley,
Idaho.
[»TOI NORMAL
TO TRAIN NURSES
PRE-NURSING COURSES TO BE
TAUGHT AT THIS SCHOOL
DURING COMING YEAR
LEWISTON.—In cooperation with
the American council on education,
the Lewiston State Normal school has
made plans to establish intensive pre
nursing courses with the purpose of
not only preparing young people in
the academic subjects for more ad
vanced courses in military and civil
hospitals, but also to develop a basis
for preparation for community health
service. The proposed courses have
been submitted to the surgeon gen
eral of the United States army, and
Lewiston has been designated to do
this training work. The first section
consisting of twenty students, will be
gin work January 13th, the work to
continue twelve weeks. The original
plan was to render this service as a
war measure, but advices from Wash
mgton have urged the institution to
offer the courses even though the war
is ended. A letter from the war de
partment urging the normal school
to offer the work, is as follows:
...... ear mg that the cessation of hos
turtles may lead to the abandonment
of this project, I am writing to you
to urge that you do not permit this,
It is indeed quite possible that we
shall not send students overseas, as,
had the war continued, we proposed
domg. It is also very probable that
we shall not send our graduate nurses
in any such numbers as its continua
tion would have necessitated, and this
fact may lead to the belief that the
proposed enrollment would not be
justified by the present or future
needs for nurses. Both the war and
the recent epidemic have forcefully
presented the inadequacy of our sup
ply of trained nurses, and they have
not less clearly demonstrated the im
portant part skilled nursing plays in
the care of the sick and injured and
the prevention of disease. The re
construction period will inevitably
call for greatly increased numbers of
nurses, and for a field that requires
a broad and sound preparation. The
^ you propose should lay the
foundation which is needed. I can
-courses
,
not, therefore, too strongly urge that
the colleges arranging to offer these
courses should not abandon them,
feeling confident that the pupils so
prepared will find no difficulty in ob
tammg immediate assignments, either
m a military or a civil school/*
Students who are interested in pre
paring themselves to serve in either
civil or military hospitals, as well as
those who may be interested in the
important work of community health
supervision, will find it to their ad
vantage of correspond with the nor
mal school. It is believed there will
be no difficulty in placing students
desiring such preparation, in some of
the arge hospitals in the country.
A COLONY OF BEAVERS
LIVE NEAR JULIAETTA 1
For many years a colony of beavers
has made its home on Big Potlatch
creek in and just below the village j
of Juliaetta and along the mill-race. ]
They have built three dams in the '
creek and the water was made to back |
up so" much in one place that a small j
lake was formed in the village park j
and a fine spring in the park was
flooded. It is said that considerable
damage was done to the mill-race
ditch by these gnawing animals by
making holes and letting out the i
water from the mill-race, and thus in- |
terfering with the electric light sys . ,
tern which depends upon this water
for electric current I
ror eiectnc current. j
j
;
WASHINGTON-Senator Wesley
nletT t' f Washington state, com- |
pleted at S o clock this afternoon, an
airplane flight from the national .
capitol with Lieutenant Bogg an army .
avmtor Senator Jones will fly back .
to Washington Monday.
j
The new quarantine rules go into \
effect at midnight tonight. The pic- |
ture shows will be open tonight, as.
usual, but after tonight there will be ■
no shows and there will be no serv
ices in the churches tomorrow. Wheth
er or not there will be church services
one week from tomorrow (January 5)
will be announced before that time,
It is hoped that this one week of close
observance of the quarantine rules
will rid Moscow of influenza and that |
on January 6 the ban can be lifted
from all schools, churches and other
public gatherings.
JONES OF WASHINGTON
MAKES AIRPLANE FLIGHT
No Church Service Tomorrow.
TAX PAYERS CROWD
TREASURER'S OFFICE
USUAL RUSH TO PAY TAXES
BEFORE THEY BECOME DE
LINQUENT IS NOW ON
Have you paid your taxes yet?
You have only one week in which to
pay them and escape being delinquent.
Next Saturday, January 4, is the last
day on which taxes can be paid with
out a penalty. They become delin
quent the first Monday in January.
People realize this and are paying
taxes at a lively rate since Christmas.
Before that time it looked like then
would be a large delinquency this
year, for fewer had paid taxes than
usual up to that time. But since
Christmas there has been a rush of
taxpayers at the office and vast sums
have been turned into the treasury.
Miss Ruth Broman, retiring county
treasurer, is being assisted in the
work by an able corps of assistants.
Miss Iona S. Adair, county treasurer
elect is working in the office and
familiarizing herself with the work,
as is B. C. Rowe, who will be Miss
Adair's chief deputy when she as
sumes office on Monday, January 13.
We desire to issue a solemn protest
against the action of the city health
officers in closing the churches at a
moment when there is no potent reas
0 n for so doing. We feel that the ac
tion shows a frivolous attitude to
ward the worship of Almighty God
in that, at a moment when there are
fewer cases of influenza than at any
previous time since the disease ap
peared the worship of God should be
forceably discontinued. We point out
that all through the Christmas season
gatherings of large parties in private
homes have taken place with no ad
verse effect upon the situation; that
suc h parties have been in many cases
larger than the church congregations
meeting in far more spacious build
i, lgs . We also point out that large
numbers gather continuously in the
MOSCOW MINISTERS
ENTER A PROTEST
ARE DISPLEASED WITH CLOS
ING OF CHURCHES AND SAY
SO IN PLAIN WORDS
stores and other business places and
that the discrimination against the
churches is as unjust to the churches
as j t j s detrimental to the morale of
I the commönity
We believe that the churches should
| haV e remained open; that the people
should have been encouraged to as
sem bl e and unite in prayer to the end
, that the scourge be exterminated,
| when the destinies of the world were
I he Id in the balances the president of
I a gTeat republic called upon all the
peo ple to assemble in their places of
worship and pray. The congress of
| the United States joined heartily in
( th; s request.
I W e urge upon the authorities con
j s i de ration of the spiritual and moral
e ff ec ts of the cessation of divine wor
s h ip and wou i d po int out that the con
dition of nervousness and fear pro
da ced by their action far out weighs
any possible beneficial effect,
j n submitting to the present ruling
0 f again closing our churches we do
so upon the understanding that they
s h a n ope n on Sunday, the fifth of
January, but that the policy of quar
antining the homes in which influ
enza previals from now on shall be
vicmronslv enforced
fSigned) H. O. PERRY,
W. H. BRIDGE,
DEAN HAMILTON,
J. QUINCY BIGGS,
WAYNE S. SNODDY.
. - Trrl i*. t cm
^PORTANT COMMITTEE IN SES
S !° N.—P AST OR G O E ST O SPO
KANE TOMORROW
. 7~ - ., .
. The county committee of the Chrin
tian churches of Latah county is in
session in Moscow today for the pur
pose of considering the church budget
f<)r 19lg an(J tQ facilitat e the work
of the "Every member" canvass for
Latah county.
The meeting is being held in the
StoMoïcow^hurS. ^flhoVprSenf
. addition to Rev . M r. Biggs, the
chairman are Mrs . E . L . Clarke and
Mrs . E £ ad of Moscow, and Erick
Qller and professor James Egbert,
f T The sessio ns began It 11
o'clock today.
Rev. J. Quincy Biggs, pastor of this
church has been called to Spokane to
preach the funeral sermon, next Mon
da y, 0 f Mrs. James Ronolds, a mem
her of the Dean Avenue Christian
church, of Spokane, of which Rav.
Mr. Biggs was formerly pastor. Mr.
and Mrs. Biggs will leave Moscow
Sunday afternoon for Spokane, Mrs.
Biggs having been invited to attend
the funeral and assist in the singing.
Mrs. Biggs and Mrs. Ronolds were
both members of the choir of the
Dean Avenue Christian church when
the Rev. J. Quincy Biggs was pastor
there, and the two women ware close
friends.
MEFJING TODAY

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