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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, December 28, 1918, Image 3

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1918-12-28/ed-1/seq-3/

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Cit>>Ne\*
Weather—Idaho—Tonight, fair
he south, rain or snow in the north.
■ armer Sunday, with rain or •snow
I the north and southwest. Fair
I the southeast, Sunday.
K. L. Barton, nephew of Mrs. W. A.
Beets, was honorably discharged
Im Vancouver and has been visit
R a few days in Moscow. He left
^hy for his home at Richards, Mo.
■oyd Stenger, who has been home
■a furlough, left today for Camp

is.
Mrs. A. Mary Cornwall has gone
Portland to visit her sons for sev
eral weeks.
Mrs. Ben Schooler of the Genesee
section, has been notified that her söh,
Irvin Schooler, was killed in action.
H. R. Ebel has returned from a trip
to Sweetwater.
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Rivers have gone
to Pullman to make their home.
For Sale—Good quality baled alf
alfa hay at $28.00 per ton at mill.
Any quantity. Mark P. Miller Mill
74-tf
ing Co.
Otto Conner left today on a busi
ness trip to Portland.
VtMiss Mabel Muse of Spokane is
visiting Miss Jessie Ebel.
Mrs. Art Johnson of Ritzville,
Wash., has been visiting her parents,
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Abrahamson
at Blaine. Mrs. Johnson went to her
home this morning, accompanied by
her sister, Miss Julia Abrahamson.
Mrs. L. Hagstedt went to Kendrick
last evening to act a§ nurse.
Mrs. M. J. Shields, who has been
visiting her daughter, Mrs. Wm. Lee,
left this morning for her home at
Spokane.
Mr. and Mrs. George Mosier of Col
ton were shopping in Moscow yester
day.
V-,
-i.
<.
Mtss Signa Gilbertson accompanied
her aunt, Mrs. M. H. Christie, to
Troy last evening, for a few days'
" XT * , . ,
Mrs. N. H. Rhodes of Lewiston is
visiting a few days with Mrs. Cal
%
Mrs. R. Pruitt and children of Lap
wm, Idaho, are visiting with Mrs.
Pruitt s mother, Mrs. Gertrude Weeks,
Miss Katherine .Bryden, formerly
countv S has°been e visRing er in mÏcoÎ
for several days MissBryden^snow
a member of the faculty of Washing
ton State College, at Pullman and is
located there. She spent some time
at Seattle and other points in west
ern Washington doing instruction j
work for the state college. - Her
mother, who is now visiting at !
S.T»d'" Ä" home "Si
SÄ Mo"i V, , n c g rThe
1
Corp. Fred Otness returned Wed- ■
nesday from the Vancouver barracks, j
having been honorably discharged. ;
Mr. Otness has-been in service for a [
mg for the betterment of soldier life. |
Miss Amanda Hagstron returned ,
from Garfteld Thursday evening,
where she has been helping nurse in
fluenza patients.
Mr. and Mrs. B. A. Smith and |
Rodger and Judson, Mrs. Eunice j
Knapp and Russell were guests
Christmas of Mr. and Mrs. G. J.
Fresh ground green bones for
chickens at Cold Storage Market.
75-tf
1
Bessee and Miss Alice Bessee.
R. H. Cary and Arthur Zosselin,
of Moscow, are among recent arrivals
in Long Beach, California, a beautiful
seaside city near Los Angeles.
Mrs. Helen Denning entertained at
Christmas dinner, Mr. and Mrs. D. F.
Kessler.
L. Young of Seattle, a former resi
dent of Moscow, is an arrival today
over the Inland.
Mrs. James Bumgarner has just re
covered from a week's illness of in
fluenza.
Miss Maud Covington of the univer
sity library, spent the Christmas holi
days in Spokane.
Miss Virginia Dermott, and Miss
Bernice Day, accompaied by her
nurse, Mrs. Walker, left today for
Portland. Mrs. J. J. Day expects to
join them there soon, when they will
ge to California.
Miss Amanda Johnson of Troy was
visiting with Mrs. Theodore Lund
quist ■ between trains yesterday.
Mrs. J. J. Keane is very sick, at
her home, of neuritis.
Misses Mabel and Myrtle Dunn of
Cojfax are visiting their parents, Mr.
and Mrs. G. W. Dunn of Joel.
Mrs. R. Noftsger went to her home
at Orofino today.
Joe Lynch, auctioneer, of Palouse,
is in,Moscow today.
Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Dunn of Joel
are shopping in Moscow today.
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Perkins and
children of Genesee are visiting Mrs.
Perkins' parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. L.
Naylor.
Frank Featherstone of Spokane, is
in the city.
Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Miller and
two children from Spokane, are visit
ing Mrs. Miller's parents, Mr. and
Mrs. A. S. Olson.
Mrs. H. A. Spils and sons, George
and Jake and daughter, Dora, from
Colton, were in Moscow yesterday.
Mrs. D. C. Gardner has been to
Pullman to visit her daughter, Mrs.
Stephen Codwill.
Homer Slater of the marines,-a re
cent arrival from Mare Island, is visit
ing at the home of his sister, Mrs.
Chas. Walton. ,
Miss Agnes Bailey, a teacher of
Kendrick, has been visiting during
the holidays at the home of Mrs. L.
B. Weterman.
Miss Winifred Edmundson and Miss
Adaline Hupp went to their schools
today at Orangeville.
Miss Clara Abrahamson of Blaine
■Went to her school today at Kendrick.
Miss Theo Smith returned to her
school near Deary.
When the Red Cross Takes Your Christmas Dollar to France
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Courtesy of O. Leroy Baldridge, The Stars and Stripes, France.
Arvid Anderson, son of Mr. and
Mrs. J. A. Anderson, who is with the
navy, arrived home Thursday from
Palham Bay, N. Y., on a ten days'
furlough. Arvid came from France,
Dec. 11th. A cablegram was received
yesterday from Ernest their other
son who is m France, stating he is
well and wishing a Merry Christmas.
A. B. Mclntire and R. C. Wood
ru ff have traded residences. Mr. Mc
Intire now lives at 3rd and Lieuallen
and Mrs Woodruff is domiciled on
North Lilly.
Mr ' and ^rs. A. B Mclntire had
* Vm ' Costlg3n '
Miss Rose Hawks returned yester
day from Nampa. Her sister, l^iss
Nettie Hawks is improving from an
attack of influenza and leaves the hos
pital today to convalesce at the home
of her sister at Nampa* .
A /!F"T U lïS
^
ÄÄTffiS to Ä has'brought !
stomach and bowel trouble to many 1
household. Children are fond of |
Oatmeal Blend; it is a wholesome and ;
nourishing food and easily digested.;
_ 88tf l
Latah County Records. '
Dec 2 7.— M. L.—D. W. Miller and
Helen p atten>
Mrs. Lester Roberts and daugter
returned today from Seattle, where
she has been visiting her mother.
C. M.— A. G. Broton to A. P. John
$200, due 10-1-19; 3 horses, 2
son,
cows, etc.
Rel.—G. A. Putman to J. A. Moore,
41-431.
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Rel.—C. B. Holt to A. B. Mclneire,
L- Naylor to R. C. Wood
™ff.
Q. C. D.—Lucy S. Costigan to
Aaron B. Mclntire, $1; 14-5 Lieual
len's 4th, Moscow.
Q. c. D.—Lucy B. Calkins to R. C.
Woodruff, $ 1 , above.
W - d.— A. B. Mclntire to R. C.
Woodruff, $1; above.
w. D.— R. C. Woodruff to A. B. Me
intire, $1; 10, 11-3 Lieuallen's 4th,
Moscow.
R, M .—A. B. Mclntire to C. B. Holt,
$500, due 12 .i 4 -21, above.
R. M ._R. G. Woodruff to J. U
^ayior, $212.40 due 12-14-20, 14-6
Lieuallen s 4th, City.
W. D.— W. A. Hollingsworth to C.
W. Green, $1; 449.10 A in 7 and 18-38
14 and in 13-38-5.
Deed.—Muscovite Mica Co. to T. H.
Erickson, $1 ; mining claim m 22-41-2.
Q. C. D.— W. H. Sills to T. H. Erick
'°E.l'-PottoM State Bant to San,
«tÄL" Potlatch
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p ïu t tt t-o w r Ron
f sj' «•> 10 - 1 ' 19 ' 4
° m ° bl ®' 6tC '
W. D—A. P. Hildahl to Henry Fem
reit, $6200; El-2 SE1-4 1-39-2.
First Christian Church.
We regret very much that we are
to have no services Sunday, but there
will be all services for Sunday week,
open to all classes.
While we do not agree with the
plan that has been adopted, yet we
,
i
submitted to the ruling in order to
get the house quarantine as we have
wanted all during the epidemic. It
th n xï w^k
in elimfnafirnr 1he dise ^se
M . hannv and nros
peroU g jj ew Ye ar F
' j quINCY BICCS
_L|tr_
^ A ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ L L , ,
+ + + + + + 44 4 4 4 4 4-r44444
+ +
P ur er P° rts Educe is country 4
+ entered the war have Justified a 4
+ statement made by the Food Ad- 4
* ministration shortly after its con- + B
+ ce P t)on - outlining the principles +
+ and p " ic es that would govern 4
J " of thls country8 J
* °jl P n - o .. , . ♦
| rouna anon of de- +
j J mocracy, declared the Food Ad- 4*
**" ministration, lies- in the indi- 4
4- vidual initiative of Its peopD 4
4- and their willingness to serve the 4
Democracy can +
"h Jdeld to discipline, and we can 4
* so,ve this food problem for our 4
4- own people and for the Allies in 4
4* this way. To have done so will 4
4- have been a greater service than 4
+ our immediate objective, for we 4
4- have demonstrated the rightful- 4
4- ness of our faith and our ability 4
4- to defend ourselves without b*- 4*
♦ Ing Prussianised." + i els
4
1.
our
4* interests of the nation with com- 4
4* plete seif effacement in the time 4
4* of emergency.

♦ + + + + + + + + + + + ++ + T + d*+
Read The Daily Star-Mir
ror Want Ads.
I
WHEAT SHOWED
SPIRIT OF U. S.
Sacrifice to Ensure Allied Loaf
Greatest Single Food
Achievement.
SUFFICIENT SUPPLY NOW.
All the Nation« Will Be Able to Re.
turn to Their Normal Sup
ply of White
Bread.
Overshadowing all other accomplish-*!
ments of the American people under
the leadership of Food Administration
1« the history of wheat exports in the
past sixteen months. Our wheat ex
P° rr program proved conclusively to
the world that America was in this
war from start to finish and willing to
make any sacrifice that will hasten
vlctory or maintain the health and
strength of people overseas, upon
whom rested the heaviest weight of
our war.
Now that pressure on ocean tonnage
Is eased by the stopping of large move
ments of troops to Europe, we may re
lax our efforts to save wheat. The ae
cumulated surplus In Australia. Argen
tine and other hitherto inaccessible
markets will become available, and
probably no more than our normal sur
plus will have to leave this country,
We in America and the nations which
have won the world for freedom will
be enabled to eat their normal wheat
loaf at the common table of the peo
pi«« 0 f democracy.
We entered th * pMt crop y * ar
wheat supply whlch « aTe 118 onl -V
*>,000,000 bushels available for #x
port. When the crop year ended, we
had »ent 141,000,000 bushels of wheat
Europe The American people had
«aved out of their normal consumption
1*1,000,000 bushels,
A survey of export figures show*
that the conservation of flour brought
about by the wheatless meals wheat
less days substitution In our kitchen*
nd bakeries, enabled us to send to
our armies and the allies 33.000,000* !
barrels of white flour-wheat figured
«our. Had we exported only our!
vistble surplus, we would have been
able to ship less than 4.500,000 barrels, i
Beforé the 1st of December our sur
plus had gone overseas, and an addi- I
tlonal 36,000,000 bushels had been tak
from the stock reserved for home j
consumption and added to the surplus I
already shipped to the allies. It seem- j
hardly possible that we could bring
our total exports above 100,000,000
bushels by July 1. But >n January the
late Lord Rhondda, then British Food
Controller, cabled that unless we
could send an additional 75,000,000
bushels he could not rake respond
bllity for assuring his people that they
would lie fed. The American people
responded by sending 85,000,000 bush
of wheat, saved from their home
consumption, between the first of the
year and the advent of the new cn»p.
By October 10, 1918, we bad already
shipped 65,960,305 bushels since July
Absolutely the only limitation upon
wheat exporta since the latest har
tonnage. If axports continue at the
present rate, by July 1 of next year
we will have sent more than 237,500,
000 bushels to Europe.
Thus are we making good America's
pledge that the bread rations of Allied
Europe shall be maintained.
A Mamorabl* Achievement
of the Titanic Struggle
America saved and sent to Europe
Id a year of crop failure 141,000,000
bushels of wheat, which saved Europe.
++f++t++ + i+ t+ + + + + t+
+
4
♦ A GERMAN HOPE DISPROVED ♦
AND
♦ A GERMAN FEAR CONFIRMED 4
+

♦ A statement made by a proral- 4*
♦ nent German official soon after +
♦ this country was declared in a 4
♦ state of war witli Germany 4
♦ show« that even in the enemy 4*
♦ country clear thinking students 4
♦ did not undervalue the strength +
♦ of the American republic. Only +
4> in his confidence that we could +
♦ not land in Europe sufficient +
4 troops to affect the final decision +
4 was this German mistaken.
♦ "I do not fejir thf. American 4
♦ soldiers," he told a high official 4
♦ of our government, "because +
4 they cannot arrive in time. What +
4 I fear la the Intelligence end de- 4
4 votion of one hundred million *
4 original minds and people train- 4
4 ed to a failli In Individual initia- 4
4 live. The day that these peo- 4
4 pie, now so materialistic in out- 4
4 ward appearance, are stirred 4
4 spiritually, that day is the day 4
4 of Germany's doom."
1-44444 4-44444444 4 444
4
4
iimmmmmimummmmmwuimvwwwia
Save food |
- MM* l^i
Who shares
in the straggle
Will share
in the triumph
*
S
American Willingness to Give Up
Luxury Demonstrated Na
tion's War Conscience.
STAND WITH THE ALLIES.
!
By Reducing Consumption People of
the United States Averted a
Famine at Home in Spit*
of Low Supplie«.
The fact that the people of the
; United States were able to reduce by
m ore than one-half million tons their
July, August, September and October
consumption of sugar proves conclu
sively that their war conscience was
thoroughly awakened and that the
country as a whole stood ready to fol
| 0W tlie injunctions of tlie Government
Our normal consumption of sugar In
the four-month period beginning with
•Inly lias been 400,000 tons per month,
n total of 1,000,000 for the quarter
vear.
In July, when our sugar stringency
began to reach its height, consumption
was reduced to 260,000 tons,
In Au
gust only 325.000 tons went into dls
irlbutlon and in September only 279,
ooo tons,
fell to 230,000 tons.
in October the distribution
If the general public had failed to
observe the injunctions of the Food
Administration this country would
have been in the throes of a sugar
r . lmlne be fore the end of August Our
visible supplies were so iow as to bring
sugar crops w.re in sight
Now the nation is in a position so
that if we choose we may return t.
our normal home use of sugar, and
Europe, with the release of ships to go
strlcted rations. If, however, those
nations are to increase their use of
great anxiety to those familiar with
the sugar situation.* They feared that
it would be absolutely impossible to
reduce consumption to a point where
sugar would no longer be a mere lux
ury in the American diet.
Few accomplishments of the Food
Administration will stand forth so pre
dominantly as tins reduced consump
tion of sugar. By It we have been able
to bridge over the period of stringency
until the new beet and Louisiana cane
far afield, can maintain its recent re
sugar very considerably it must be by
our continued sharing with them
through limiting our own consump
rion.
ls Interesting to lecail the confidence
wIth which* the United States Food
Administrator viewed the gloomy out
Iook ln Jul y of 1917 - wheD this coun
tr >' had been in the war for less than
four months and the Germans were
steadily sending the western front
nearer and nearer to Paris,
AMERICAN SPIRIT
RELIED ON TO WIN.
In the light of succeeding events it
"Even though the situation In Eu
rope may be gloomy today," be de
clared in a public statement, "no
American who has of
results already obtained in every di
rection need have one atom of fear
that democracy will not defend Itself
in these United States."
LOYALTY IN LITTLE
THINGS LAST PROOF
OF PATRIOTISM
Americans without murmuring cut
their sugar allowance from four
pounds a month to three and then as
tong as need be to two pounds for loy
alty's sake.
Food Will Win the World.
Atnerica earned (lie gratitude of al
lied nations during war by sharing
food. America under peace may win
the world's good will by saving to
share.
Cu CTn til fSfi vgJa
I
lim« 1
:
4444444-4 44444444444
4
4
4 DEMOCRACY V8. AUTOCRACY. 4
4
4
4
"There Is no royal road to 4
4 food conservation. We can only 4
4 accomplish this by the voluntary 4
4 action of our whole people, each 4
4 element in proportion to Ita 4
4 needs. It is a matter of equality 4
4 of burden."
The truth of this statement, 4
4 made by the United Suites Food 4
4 Administrator soon utter we en- 4
4 tered the war, has been borne 4
4 out by the history of our ex- 4
4 ports. Autocratic food control 4
4_ in the lands of our enemlee has 4
4 broken down, while democratic 4
4 food sharing has maintained the 4
4 health and strength of this coun- 4
4 try and of the Alliea.
4
4
4
4
444444444 4 444-1 4-.-44 +

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