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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, December 28, 1918, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1918-12-28/ed-1/seq-4/

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Engineering
and Vocational Training
Approved by U.S. Gov. Officials
The most thorough and prac
tical school in all Engineering
and Vocational Sciences—offer
ing complete courses in ONE
HALF the time usually requir
ed by Universities.
Elimination pf non-essential
subjects; intensified courses and
individual instruction enables us
to effect this saving of time.
Well equipped shops, labora
tories and field instruments.
Courses in; Civil, Electrical,
Mechanical and Mining Engin
eering, Auto - Mechanics, Ma
chine Shop, Oxy - Acetylene
Welding, Commercial and Wire
less Telegraphy.
We have fully demonstrated
that it is not necessary to spend
four years in High School and
another four years in Univer
sity before being an Engineer.
Actual engineering work done
by advanced students.
Opportunities to earn board
and lodging.
New Term Beginning Jan. 6th
Address
POLYTECHNIC COLLEGE OF
ENGINEERING
13th and Madison Sts
Oakland, Cal.
SPEARING SALMON
IN THE CLEARWATER
FINE SPORT AT LEWISTON.—
SOME GOOD CATCHES MADE
—PIONEERS HAVE FUN
Yes, salmon spearing is a winter
sport in Lewiston, due to the fact
that
It is a thrilling sport, in fact, for the
salmon is a game fish and the Clear
water product is a big fellow, too.
C. T. Stranahan brought nine sal
mon to the Lewiston market yester
day and this development revealed
the fact that his sons had spent
Thursday night on the river, a winter
pastime that has grown through years
to be an habitual sport with the
Stranahan family. Mr. Stranahan
years ago with A1 Smith initiated the
salmon hunt, following the custom of
the old Indian fishermen, and when
the Stranahan boys got old enough
they learned to enjoy the sport also.
The method is this. A boat is
hauled up the stream several miles,
placed in the river and a gasoline
located shad
Lewiston has two great rivers.
IT'S NOT YOUR HEART;
IT'S YOUR KIDNEYS
Kidney disease is Bo respecter of per
A majority of the ills afflicting
people today can be traced back to the
kidney trouble.
The kidneys are the most important
organs of the body. They are the fil
tcrers of your blood. If the poisons
which are swept trom the tissues by the
blood are not eliminated through the
kidneys, disease of one form or another
will claim you as a victim.
Kidney disease is usually indicated by
weariness, sleeplessness, nervousness,
despondency, backache, stomach trou-
ble, pain in loins and lower abdomen,
gall stones, gravel, rheumatism, sciatica
and lumbago.
- All these derangements are nature's
Sons.
HOW TO REALIZE MOST MON
EY FROM YOUR LIVESTOCK
FIRST—Select the nearest market that pays top prices for
your stock.
SECOND—Consign your shipment to the commission firm that
gives you best service.
The Spokane Union Stockyards, with its reputation for the high
est priced in the Northwest, answers the first requirement. That
our firm handles more stock than all our competitors combined in
dicates what shippers think of our service.
We can fill your feeder and stocker orders.
P. W. Murphy Commission Co.
UNION STOCKYARDS
WASHINGTON
SPOKANE

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Si
ABSOLUTE CONTROL
YOU HAVE ABSOLUTE CONTROL
OF YOUR ACCOUNT IN THE FIRST
NATIONAL. NO ONE CAN EVER
WITHDRAW YOUR MONEY EXCEPT
BY YOUR WRITTEN CONSENT.
Ü
The First National Bank
OF MOSCOW
à
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Member Federal Reserve Bank
J. S. HECKATHORN, Cashier
W. L. PAYNE, President
ow the craft but to reflect deep into
the waters. Then the boat is sent
adrift with the sportsmen, spears
hand, muscles tense and eyes strained.
A black spot is disclosed out of har
mony with the clearness of the flow
ing stream and down shoots the spear,
If the aim is good there comes a bat
tie and finally with man winning
big fellow is hoisted over the boat
side. It is a fact that sometimes
these denizens of the deep are drag
ged from depths reaching ten feet,
for a strong arm will swing a spear
with great force and remarkable ac
curacy. In the old days, the senior
Stranahan and A1 Smith would de
vote practically all the daylight hours
to gathering sufficient pitch for the
illumination equipment, but now gas
oline is a convenient substitute.—Lew
iston Tribune.
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♦ FIRST CALL TO FOOD ARMY. ♦

This co-operation and service ♦
♦ I ask of all In full confidence ♦
4* that America will render more 4
•fr for flag and freedom than king 4
* ridden people surrender at com- 4
4 1 pulsion.—Herbert Hoover, Au- 4
4- gust 10, 1917.

4
4* 4» 4» ❖ 4» 4» 4* 4» 4» 4* «§» 4» 4* 4* «§• 4» 4» 4. 4.
A year ago voluntary fond
was a daring adventure in democracy
during the year an established
of democratic efficiency.
control
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News from Khaki Boys
Chief of Police Stillinger has re
ceived the following letter from his
son. Lieutenant Otto Stillinger, which
gives more information than any let
ter received from France in a long
time, due to the lifting of the censor
ship rules. The letter follows:
Luneuville, France.
Nov. 24, 1918
Dear Dad: As today is the day
when all soldiers of the A. E. F. write
to their first commanding officers,
and as censorship regulations have
been raised to some extent, I thot I
would write you a few lines contain
ing a little information of my life
over here, but it will necessarily be
quite brief.
I consider that my life here is di
vided in three quite distinct periods,
namely: 1st, njy trip across the ocean;
2rgi, my period of training in France,
and 3rd, and what I consider the most
important, the last battle of the war.
HARD WOOD FLOORS
Get your hard wood floors sanded
and polished by motor power 'now.
Half the cost of hand work. Ma
chine will be here for a limited
time only. Harry Stern. Phone
105W. 76-80
signals that the kidneys need help*
You should use GOLD MEDAL Haar
lem Oil Capsules immediately. The
soothing, healing oil stimulates the
kidneys, relieves inflammation and de
stroys the germs which have caused it.
Go to
box of
Capsules. In twenty-four hours you
should feel health and vigor returning.
After you feel somewhat improved
continue to take one or two capsules
each day, so as to keep the first-class
condition and ward off the danger of
other attacks.
Ask for the original imported GOLD
MEDAL brand. Three sizes. Money re
funded if they do not help you.
your druggist today and get a
GOLD MEDAL Haarlem Oil
1st. As you know we went aboard
our transports ou the 13th of July
and on the morning of the 14th we
| sailed down the river and out into
| the ocean. Many were the heavy
hearts as we took what might have
been, and was for some of the boys,
our last look at the Statue of Liberty
a and of the best country in the world,
There were 13 transports in our con
voy and each and every one of them
was camouflaged to the highest de
gree. My regiment was on an En
glish transport, by name Caronia, and
there were other regiments aboard, in
all a total of 4500 men. The Caronia
was probably the largest ship of the
convoy. The total number of men in
the entire convoy amounted to 46,000.
From the above statements you can
see that Uncle Sam was sending
troops over in large bodies. Just at
the entrance of the harbor -we picked
up our destroyers and one battleship,
We were also escorted for some few
miles (in fact all the first day) by a
dirigible balloon. You have probably
read of similar convoys and I cannot
express in words the stately and seri
ous aspect of that sight. When we
were some three days out we were
deserted by our armed ships. Every
day at 10 o'clock we had boat-drill,
and although the boats officers claim
ed that there were life boats and life
rafts for every one aboard I couldn't
for the life of me believe it. Every
one aboard* was required to keep his
life preserver in his possession at all
times, and the officers were required
to carry their pistols. We had beau
tiful weather during our entire trip,
but even at that I don't believe that
there was a day when I felt that my
stomach was absolutely sane. At night
absolutely no lights were allowed to
show from any part of the ship and
at stated times all ships would change
courses and in fact we "zig-zagged"
our way across the ocean for 13 days.
At one time we simply sailed in a
circle for several hours and later
found that submarines were laying
for our convoy. One beautiful after
noon we sighted some dark spots
which later proved to be our destroy
ers. One the 26th day of July we
glided into Liverpool harbor and dis
embarked the same day. I shall never
forget what a grand and glorious feel
ing it was to again place my feet on
something stable. English bands es
corted us from the dock to the rail
road station where we boarded a train
for Winchester.
ehester some time in the early morn
ing and then hiked some three or four
miles to a "rest" camp. This place
Landed at Win
Auto - Mechanics
AND MACHINE SHOP
The only school of its kind in
the West. Selected by the U. S.
Gov. for training soldiers for
actual war service.
Best equipped.School of Auto
mobile Engineering and ma
chine shop work west of Chi
cago.
Expert instructors, actual
practice in overhauling and re
pairing cars.
Over $30,000 in equipment in
shops, laboratories and garages.
A chance to earn board and
lodging while attending college.
New term beginning Jan. 6th.
Address
POLYTECHNIC COLLEGE OF
ENGINEERING
13th and Madison Sts
Oakland, Cal.
Sanitary
Plumbingl
I
Deficient plumbing is never
sanitary, and is dear at any
price.
Your health or even your life
may depend on the care
given to the laying of a drain
pipe.
I
I
I
I
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I
Guard Your
Health
We GUARANTEE .very piece
of plumbing we do to be
PERFECT befor. we quit the
lob.
Play safe—let
plumbing RIGHT.
do your
Witter
Fisher
C
o m p a n y
Phone 230
You will find you save more
and live better if you trade, at
the
THIRD STREET
MARKET
CHICKENS, GEESE, DUCKS
AND HIDES WANTED
PHONE 248
L. M. KITLEY
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THE SEMI-ANNUAL
YELLOW TRIANGLE
CLEAN-UP SALE
Starts MONDAY Morning
is
I
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Y ou want to save and we want to h elp you do it. Added to the great reduc
tions on all seasonable merchandise like Women's Ready-to-Wear at ONE
HALF PRICE AND MORE, we are passing on to you the good buys we have
made on many staple articles. Good big bargains await you all over the store.
We call your attention to the first week's selling prices on staples.
m.
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Heavy 27-inch Outings, lights, d arks and fancies (Wholesale
price today 30c a yard), per yard...
24-inch Percales, good patterns, 50 pieces, per yard.
20 pieces Sanitos Oil Cloth, 50c grade, per yard.
Turkish Bath Towels, 42x19 inches, three for ...
Don't miss the bargains in Women's and Misses Winter Coats
Monday ...
Reduced $1.00 a day until the last day of the sale they all go at $1.00.
Great bargains at $21.00—Plushes, Mata Lambs, Velours and many will be
sold the first day.
23c
i'
20c
33 l-3c
. .$ 1.00
$21
»
SHOES YELLOW TRIANGLED FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY
See the Underwear tables piled with broken lots at clean-up prices. 15
per cent discount on complete lines for Men, Women and Children.
fi
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GROCERY SPECIALS FOR NEXT WEEK
.5c
25c
Calumet Baking Powder, 1-lb.
can, per can.
Matches, a box..
Bob White Soap, 5 bars.
Extra Standard Pure Cream
Corn, two cans for.
Golden Age Macaroni, Spagetti
and Noodles, three pkgs.
*
18c
New Crop Brown Beans, per lb., 5c
Mt. Vernon Evaporated Milk,
two cans for
25c
if
25c
25c
Notice of Rules Regarding the Conduct of this Sale •
To cooperate in every possible way with the health authorities in preventing the spread of in
fluenza which has been so admirably controlled in our community, we have taken every precau
tion to prevent over-crowding. Sales counters will be so placed that there can be no jamming
and we assume the right to close the doors at a ny time until the people in the store are servéd.
We advise morning shopping. We will distribute the Special Bargains so there will be many
attractive items offered throughout the Sale. Use the phone, and we assure you satisfactory
service.
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DAVIDS'
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VI
proved to be a rest camp in name
only and both sleeping accommoda
tions and rations were very poor. Be
cause of some sort of disease we had
to move from this camp to another,
Winnhall Down. We remained at this
place a week and then hiked to South
hampton, where we boarded a small
boat and crossed the channel to
France. We made the trip across the
channel in one night and were jammed
in the boat like sardines. I slept on
the floor of the smoking room with
a very greasy life preserver for a
pillow. Again at Cherbourg, France,
we hiked out to a rest camp and it
proved to be of the same quality as
the previous ones.
From this place we took a French
train for "somewhere" which finally
proved to be Paldahon, France and
our training camp.
2nd. I will only say in regard to
this period that we attended a very
good artillery school and did a great
deal of firing on the range. The
instructors were very good and the
regiment survived the course and
out with a very good record.
From here I was detailed to go to
the American gas school at Langrers,
France. I was there only 10 days
and upon completion of that course
was assigned to the 3rd Bn. Staff as
gas officer. At this place we were
also provided with our motor equip
ment. Finally our guns arrived. At
last the big day came when we re
ceived orders to proceed to the "line"
and I think all of us were a little more
serious than we had been heretofore.
We hiked to a nearby city called
Besancon, where we placed our guns
and tractors on the train. The staff
cars made up an overland convoy to
which I was attached. This convoy
left in the early afternoon, our destin
ation being a rail head (Vadelain
court). Drove all night and the next
day and the next night we arrived
there. As we were then nearing the
fighting lines the last 30 kilometers
we drove without lights.
3rd. From this place, upon receipt
of hurried orders we proceeded to a
place called Avacourt, traveling at
night. We stayed here all morning
and that afternoon we again took up
the march to our first position on the
firing line. We hiked all afternoon
come
and all night until 4:30 in the morn
ing when in pitch darkness we went
into position near the village of Rom
aine. That night we were under shell
fire for the first time and I will never
forget that first boche shell that came
whining over the road where we were
marching. Soon after getting into
position, daylight broke on us and
boche planes began to come over our
lines to observe. All of us knew that
very soon a big offensive would start
but no one knew the exact day or
hour. We remained in this position
several days exchanging shots with
Heinie. Our first casualty occurred
at our ammunition dump here, which
the boche had spotted and shelled at
irregular intervals during the entire
night. On the 21st day of October
we received orders that that night
would contain the "zero hour." Well,
everyone felt just a little nervoris,
■though we were all glad to get a
chance to show the boche what it
really meant to be shelled. At 10:30
that night we fired 1200 rounds of
gas shells in a certain wood that we
knew contained a goodly sprinkling
of Germans. Later orders came
down that we were to open our bar
rage at 3:30. At exactly 3:30 thous
ands of allied guns of all calibers
broke forth in a thunderous roar. I
can't express in mere words the im
pression I had at that time. I can
only say that the artillery prepara
tion that eventful morning was the
greatest one of the war. To state it
in a few words, "it was some Hallow
e'en party for Heinie. This terriffic
bombardment was continued until
5:30 when every gun ceased firiing
and our doughboys went over the top.
We expected a deluge of gas shells
from Heinie, but the surprise was so
great he really did not have time to
get started before our shelling be
came so deadly as to render his ar
tillery practically helpless. Our
doughboys found little opposition and
about 9 o'clock German prisoners be
gan to come back by the hundreds.
We followed our infantry as closely
as we could and our next position
was near the village of Remonville.
Our positions from there on were one
night affairs with the exception of
our last one on the banks of the
Meuse and that one demands special
mention because of its peculiar na
ture. At the next to our last posi
tion (Beauclair Farm) my battallion
received orders to proceed forward
and open fire upon the Metz-Sedan
railroad. One of our batteries, be
cause of tractor trouble, was unable
to accompany the battallion, so "E"
battery started forward on a mission
which certainly proved to be very in
teresting. Being battallion gas offi
cer, I of course accompanied this bat
tery. You can imagine our surprise
when we found that in order to fire
on that railroad it would be necessary
for us to go beyond our front line
doughboys. Tbs position
forced to take was under direct ob
servation of the Germans and when
we pulled our guns off the road into
position (still daylight) we certainly
received a warm reception. We lost
heavily but nevertheless our battery
opened fire in a remarkably short
time. Never will I forget that night
—shells from 77 's to 220's came at
us all night and we did not get the
opportunity to dig in. I will not go
into the details of our fight on that
hill, although they are forever en
graved on my memory. We held that
hill for three days until, the eventful
morning of the 11th of November,
when we were ordered to cease firing
at 11 o'clock. It certainly was hard
for us to believe that the armistice
had been signed and were only fin
ally convinced when the camp fires
that night dotted the line which a
few hours previously had been raked
with shell fire. Were we glad? Well
I should say so and anyone that ex
presses regrets that the war is over
is either a fool or a damn liar.
Well daddy, I have told you in a
very brief way my experiences since
I left the good old U. S. A. My little
story is probably incomplete in many
ways but when again I arrive in good
old Idaho I will tell you those things
which I have omitted in this, my
"Dad's Xmas Letter,**
To my darling Irish mother I send
my love arid I take this opportunity
to wish you both a Merry Xmas ana
a Happy New Year.
With best of love, I remain as ever,
Your affectionate son,
OTTO.
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