OCR Interpretation


The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, January 01, 1919, Image 2

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1919-01-01/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

The DAILY STAR-MIRROR
Published every evening except Sun
day, at Moscow, Idaho.
GEO. N. LAMPHERE, Publisher.
The Official Newspaper of the City of
Moscow.
Entered as second-class matter Oçt.
S6, 1911, at the postoffice of Moscow,
Idaho, under the Act of Congress-of
March, 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Deliverd by carrier to any part of city :
50c
Vet Month ..
Three Months
IKx Months .
One Year ...
$1.60
2 75
ÜOO
By Mail
f«utside of city and on rural routes);
Month ..
three Months
tlx Months .
#ne Year ...
The (Weekly) Idaho Post:
. ,40c
$1.16
2.26
4.00
$1.60
tTfcr Year
gJSMBER OF ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively
antitied to the use for republication
•f all news-dispatches credited to it
•r not otherwise credited in this pap
Sind also the local news published
therein.
All rights of republication of
•jiecial dispatches herein are also re
aarved.
ei
HAPPY NEW YEAR.
This is the first day of the first
year after the great war. It can and
ought to be the greatest year this
country has known. America stands I
today in better condition to meet the
future than any country in the world.
True, we have gone through the war
and helped to win it and did our "bit"
but our country has not been invaded
nor any section of it destroyed. We
have gone deeply into debt for war
purposes, but our debt is smaller, in
comparison with our wealth, than that
of any other country and we will en
joy greater prosperity during the re
construction period which begins to
day, than any other country, for we
must furnish the material for this
reconstruction work.
Idaho, the northwest and the city
of Moscow never had better pros
pects than they have today. The op
portunity confronts us and it is up to
the citizens to grasp that opportunity
and make the most of it. If we per
mit the year 1919 to go by without
making great progress for ourselves,
our city, our country and our state,
it will be our own fault.
We will not be confronted with a
shortage of labor for millions of men
drawn from the ordinary work of
this country for special war work will
be returning to their former occupa
I
tions, so the help problem, which has
been so serious sflnce the' war began,
and especially in the year just closed,
is practically solved now.
Moscow needs the united effort of
every citizen to put her ahead to the
place she should hold in this state.
The Star-Mirror pledges itself today,
and it is our first "New Year's Reso
lution" to lead every movement for
the advancement of Moscow's inter
est, for the improvement of condi
tions here and to help the merchants
and every business interest of the
town in an unselfish way to accom
plish more than has been accomplish
ed in any year in Moscow's history.
Let us all unite, lay personal preju
dices aside and resolve to make the
year 1919 the greatest, best and most
prosperous that Moscow has ever
known.
R& ftu
SOLDIER COMPLAINTS AGAINST
THE Y. M. C. A.
An army investigation, as proposed
by Dr. John R. Mott, chairman of the
war work council of the Y. M. C. A.
would be more likely to cover up and
condone the mistakes of that organi
zation than to reveal them. The chief
complaints are against the overseas
service. All the soldiers there are
still under military discipline, which
forbids complaints not made to mili
tary superiors through rigid régula
tions. Soldiers would shrink from
The Spokes
making frank and open criticisms.
Yet a thorough-going investigation
is due the American people, for not
only is the organization under criti
cism, but all the agencies as well that
worked for the raising of the funds
expended by it come in for a share
of the responsibility.
man-Review, for example, can not
deny that it has a responsibility in
this connection, since for many
months it gave its columns freely to
Y. M. C. A. propaganda and state
ments regarding the service the asso
ciation would render in the war.
We hoped those promises would be
fulfilled, but the adverse evidence of
returning soldiers is overwhelming
and The Spokesman-Review feels a
sense of humiliation that seemingly it
was a party to the deep disappoint
ment growing out of expectations
that were not realized.
It will be difficult for the Y. M. C.
A. to restore itself in the confidence
of the country. It will be impossible
for it to do so unless the organiza
tion shall establish itself an a franker
basis. Large part of the present dis
trust springs from its lack of candor
with the public in relation to the or
thodox religious restrictions in its
fundamental law governing the em
ployment of its workers. Complaint
does not lie against those restrictions
as such, but at the systematic policy
of their concealment from the con
tributing public.
Large bequests have been made to
the association conditioned on its ap
plication of certain orthodox require
ments in the employment of secretar
ies and other workers. High officials
. . __
of the organization personally have
explained while raising money that
they have waived these requirements
I in the war, but must not say so pub
.
j licly from fear of forfeiting there De
quests.
A double-shuffling policy is a
wrong foundation, whether for gov
| eminent, business, philanthropy
I religion.—Spokesman-Review.
or
I
I
m m pa
MISS GRAY'S COMMUNICATION.
Miss Ruth Gray, whose article in
the "Contribution Box" stirred Mos
cow friends and relatives of soldiers
to a great extent, says her article
was misinterpreted and that she did
not intend to attack nor speak dis
paragingly of the soldiers. We are
very glad to know this, but her ar
ticle was interpreted by every one
who reftd it as an attack upon all
soldiers who criticized the Y. M. C.
A. In a communication published to
day she denies that this was her in
tent.
editor was called upon in person and
After the article written (or sign
ed) by Miss Gray was published the
by telephone by relatives and friends
of soldiers asking "are you going to
let that go unanswered?", and criti
cising us for having published any
thing that appeared to reflect on the
soldiers as this did. The interpre
tation put upon the article by the
editor was the interpretation of prac
tically every one else who read it.
In a conversation with Mrs. Gray,
mother of the young lady whose name
appeared signed to the communication
this morning, Mrs. Gray said she did
not know there were general charges
against the conduct of the Y. M. C. A.
and thought the editorial in The Star
Mirror to which she took exception,
which urged that an investigation of
the Y. M. C. A. be made, was aimed
at Mr. Gray, who is a Y. M. C. A. sec
retary.
one.
As the editor did not know until
Miss Gray's communication was re
ceived and he began to make inquiry
as to who Miss Gray is that there
was a Mr. Gray in the Y. M. C. A.
service, he pleads not guilty to a per
sonal attack on Mr. Gray or on any
Now that Miss Gray pleads not
I guilty to the charge of debouncing
the soldiers we are willing to admit
| that there was nothing personal in
her insulting insinuations against the
editor and his "well thumbed bible"
or that the editor and "his paper"
were instruments of the devil trying
to tear down every good work. We
are willing to admit that Miss Gray
did not write the article but that
somebody "hid behind a woman's
skirts" to make a personal attack
through personal motives.
So far the The Star-Mirror is con
cerned the incident is closed.
CO
The Star-Mirror congratulates Miss
June Miller, operator of the Western
Union at Moscow, upon the increase
in salary she will get with the be
ginning of the new year. This in
crease of 10 per cent goes to all op
erators and other employes, other
than messengers, of the telegraph
companies in the United States, who
have held positions more than one
and a half years. None deserves it
more than Miss Miller whose effici
ent service and courteous treatment
of all patrons of the office have made
all of these her personal friends and
they will rejoice with her over her
good fortune,
President Lindley, of the University
of Idaho, leaves tomorrow for Balti
more on an important mission. He
will deliver an address before the
convention of land grant colleges and
attend important meetings while ab
sent. No one deserves a rest from
his hard labors more than President
Lindley and the trip will be a vaca
tion for one of the hardest worked
men in Idaho.
s is
ft ft ft
The prospects are bright for a good
year at the University of Idaho. The
indications are that the town will be
free from influenza when school opens
next Monday and that many of the
former S. A. T. C. men who returned
to their homes for the holiday vaca
tion will return to the university with
the opening of the new school year,
not as soldiers in the making, but as
students.
ft ft ft
While the cold weather is unpleas
ant and disagreeable as compared
with the very fine weather we have
been having all fall, it is a boon to the
coal dealers, the plumbers and the
ice men who are reaping their an
nual harvests.
ic?.
George Beck, who has been with the
army engineers near Washington, D.
C., spent the holidays in Moscow with
his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John A. Beck.
George is mustered out and has gone to
take his former job as civil engineer at
Pasco, Wash.
SAYS GAMP LEWIS
PRESIDENT LINDLEY GIVES IN
TERESTING FACTS CONCERN
ING ARMY CAMP
Camp Lewis w 7 as the most intelli
gent army camp in the United States
according to a statement made by Dr.
E. H. Lindley, president of the Uni
versity of Idaho, who has made a
careful study of the results of the
United States army intelligence tests.
Similar tests are to be instituted in
the Universiy of Idaho.
"Soldiers in Camp Lewis are typi
cal of the northwest," according to
President Lindley, "and the results
of these tests indicate the high av
erage intelligence of the northwest
erners."
Expert psychologists were engaged
by the government to test the intelli
gence of the men. These tests were
gjven during the two weeks quraan
tine period before the recruits were !
assigned their permanent positions in
the army. Check tests given officers |
and men who were designated by in
structors as showing ability indicate
that the tests were accurate to a sur
prising degree.
Hen were divided mto eight grades
according to their intelligence. Grades
of A and B show a very superior in
telligence. Only ten to twelve per
cent of every draft quota received
this grade. Men who are of this type
were of very high officer material
if they were endowed with the ability
of leadership.
Grades of C-plus, C and C-minus,
show average intelligence. Men re
ceiving this grade were good non
commissioned officer material and
good privates. Grades below these |
show very inferior mental equipment
and men receiving these grades were
assigned to special duty or recom
mended for dischalgre.
The high intelligence of the men !
at Camp Lewis is indicated by the |
fact that 93.6 per cent received a !
■grade of A or B. ^Camp Lewis had j
nine times as many men of marked in- j
telligence as any camp in the United
States. Only .9 of one per cent of
the men at this camp were below C.
Purposes of the tests were to se
lect men whose mental equipment
suggested that they be sent to officer
training camps, to discover those who
were slow as contrasted with the stub
born and disobedient; and to discover
those who are a burden or a menace
to the service.
sn
SUM THE TAMPA
MYSTERY OF LOST AMERICAN
CONVOY SHIP IS SOLVED BY
escaped Prisoners
LONDON.—(The Associated Press)
—The claim that the United States
ship, Tampa, was sunk by the Ger
man submarine U-53 is based upon
assertions by the officers of the U
boat that they had sunk on the day
the Tampa was lost an American es
cort vessel the name of which they
did not know. The Tampa was sent
to the bottom in the Bristol channel
off the English coast on September
26 with her whole company of 118
officers and men. No other American
warship or escort vessel was sunk on
that day.
The German claim to have sunk the
Tampa was brought here by Lieuten
ant F. L. Miller and Lieutenant J. H.
Fulcher, formerly of the Ticonderoga
who were taken prisoner On board the
U-125 when that submarine sank their
ship. During their imprisonment the
U-152 lay alongside the U-53 in the
Cattegat and the two Americans
talked with the officers and men of
the U-53. It was then that they
heard the German story. The Ger
mans, according to the two lieuten
ants, assumed that the Tampa was
their victim. American naval officers
here are inclined to think the Ger
mans may be mistaken. On the day
when the Tampa was sunk a torpedo
was fired from a submerged subma
rine at the American destroyer, Ches
ter, but the aim was faulty.
Chester immediately dropped several
depth-charges. The American officers
are of the openioii that the Germans
believe their aim had been true and
believe they mistook the explosion of
are of the opinion that the Germans
of the destruction of the Chester.
The Tampa was out of sight of
other American vessels when she was
destroyed. She had left a convoy
hound for France and soon afterward
those on board the vessels of the con
voy heard a terriffic explosion. De
stroyers found wreckage of the boats
and two unidentified men but no sur
ît has never been ascertained
The
vivors.
whether the Tampa was destroyed
by torpedo, mine or internal explo
sion. The U-53 was commanded by
Lieutenant Captain Hans Rose who
sunk a number of merchant vessels
off Nantucket. Rose claims that he
sunk the Americans destroyer, Jacob
Jones.
TEXANS KNEW OF GERMAN
CONTROL OF WIRELESS
EL PASO, Texas, Jan. 1.—Revela
tions made in Washington that Ger
mans virtually controlled the wireless
stations in Mexico was not news to
American officials on the border here.
It was known for two years that the
Germans had an elaborate system of
Wireless communication in Mexico and
news of German victories would be re
ceived in northern Mexico as soon as
it reached the United States, the wire
less stations relaying it throughout
Mexico. Much information of mili
tary value was also known to have
been sent through Mexico to Germany
by these wireless plants. The Ger
man-manned wireless stations in Mex
ico caused much interference to the
American army wireless operators by
filling the air full of wireless waves,
operators at Fort Bliss said. Many j
military messages were picked up by
the American border wireless stations, j
IDAHO, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY
+ **** + *4>*****+*|
* MARKETS
*+*++++++*++++++
The following market quotations
are the prices paid to the producer
by the dealer and are changed daily,
thus giving the public the accurate
quotations in all classes of gram,
produce and meats.
Hay and Grain.
Wheat, Marquis, bulk.$2.0714
Wheat, Bluestem No. 1, bulk,
net, delivered to warehouses 2.03%
Wheat, Bluestem No. 1, sacked
net, delivered to warehouses 2.12%
Wheat, Fortyfold, No. 1, bulk
net, delivered to warehouses 2.03%
Wheat, Fortyfold, No. 1, s'k'd
net, delivered to warehouses 2.12%
Wheat, White Club, No. 1, bulk
net, delivered to warehouses 2.02%
Wheat, White Club, No. 1, sVd
net, delivered to warehouses 2.11%
Wheat, Red Russian, No. 1, blk
net, delivered to warehouses 1.99%
W'heat, Red Russian, No. 1 skd
net, delivered to warehouses 2.08%
No. 1 Feed Oats, sacked, per
cwt, net, delivered to ware
houses
No, 1 Timothy Hay....
White Beans, per pound
EffS 3 > per ooz
Butter, creamery, per lb.
Butter, ranch, per lb ....
Potatoes, per cwt. .......
Young shickens, per lb...
PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS
dr. q L. GRITMAN—Physician and
surgeon, 720 So. Main. Phone 27.
DR. JOHN W. STEVENSON—Eye
Ear, Nose and Throat. Glasses
Fitted. Office of Dr. Aspray, 303
3rd Ave. Phone 177.
3.00
$84.00
• .07%
Produce.
60c
65c
55c
75e
[email protected]
Hogs, live wt., light, per lb.15c
Hogs, live wt., heavy, per lb
Old Roosters, per lb.
Hogs, dressed, heavy, per lb [email protected]
Hogs, dressed, light, per lb. [email protected]
. [email protected]
[email protected]
14c
8c
Veal, live wt., per lb
Veal, dressed, per lb. .
Spring lambs, per lb.
Mutton, per lb.
9c
[email protected]
PROFESSIONAL CARDS
DR. F. M. LEITCH—Physician, Com
mercial Bldg. Phone 223Y.
DR. J. J. HERRINGTON — Office
over Willis' Drug Store. Phone 346;
Phone 187R.
OSTEOPATH
DR., W. M. HATFIELD—Osteopath,
Creighton Bldg. Phone 48.
CHIROPRACTIC
+
DR. ZONA BIGGS—Chiropractic, Steele
Bldg. Phone 331H.
DENTISTS
DR. J. A. McDANIELS—Dentist, First
Nat'l Rank Bldg. Phone 229.
LAWYERS
A. L. MORGAN—lawyer, Urquhart
Bldg. Phone 75.
A. H. OVERSMITH
Atttorney-at
Law. Urquhart Bldg. Phone 208.
ORLAND & LEE — Attorneys-at-Law,
First Natl. Bank Bldg. Phones Or
lancl 104. Lee 104L.
H. R. SMITH—Attorney-at-Law, First
Natl. Bank Bldg., Third St. Entrance.
Phone 43Y.
ARCHITECTS
C. RICHARDSON, ARCHITECT—
Skattaboe Blk., phone 200.
FLORISTS
SC^JTT BROS — Proprietors, North
Main. Phone 289.
VETERINARY
DR. E. T. BAKER—Assistant State
Veterinarian. Residence Sixth and
Washington, phone 243.
DR. J. D. ADAMS — Veterinary, 220
South Asbury. Phone 15Y.
AUCTIONEER
CHAS. E. WALKS—Auctioneer, Urqu
hart Blpd. Phone 278.
CREAMERY
MOSCOW CREAMERY — 62 cents
paid for butter fat. Ice cream, bulk
and brick in cold storage.
HIDES AND JUNK
HIGHEST PRICES PAID FOR
hides and junk—Moscow Hide and
Junk Co., 308 W. 6th St. Will call
city or country. Phone 262.
EXPERT PIANO TUNING
Phone 189" W
HARD WOOD FLQORS
Get your hard wood floors sanded
and polished by motor power
Half the cost of hand work. Ma
chine will be here for a limited
time only. Harry Stern. Phone
105W. 76-80
now.
. ,
TOT Want /\uS.
You will find you save more
and live better if you trade at
the
*
THIRD STREET
MARKET
*
*
*
*1*
*
CHl'CKENS, GEESE, DUCKS
AND HIDES WANTED
PHONÉ 248
*
A
*
L. M. KITLEY
4 -
1 *
Read The Daily Star-Mir- -î*
4
*
The commissions Sales Co. is pre
pared to care .Tor all kinds of sales,
large or small. Try us. Satisfaction
guaranteed. Office at the Big Bend
Store, Moscow, Idaho. 70-94
LATAH COUNTY
TITLE & TRUST COMPANY
Abstracts of Title
Mortgage Loans
Conveyancing
Per
$ 1,000
ACRE!
GROWING
THE ALTON IMPROVED
Red Raspberry
The greatest money-maker on rec
ord. Get my book, THE FARM
ERS KEY TO SUCCESS, only 50c,
worth $100 to any farmer. Money
back if not satisfied. Pamphlet
free.
H. A. PINEGAR
Wellington, Utah.
Thompson Insurance Agency
Fire Insurance, Automobile and
Plate Glass Insurance, Fidelity and
Casualty Bonds
J. G. Vennigerholz, Prop.
Moscow, Idaho.
1
!
FOR FIRST CLASS SHOE
REPAIRING
go to
J. N. FRIEDMAN
HARNESS SHOP
^
[
FINEST LINE OF HIGH GRADE
WOOLENS. YOUR INSPECTION
SOLICITED
O. H. SCHWARZ, Tailor.
Victrolas and
Victor Records
Sherfey's Book Store
Moscow, Idaho
If It's New We Are Sure the
First to Have It
Monuments
THE MOSCOW MARBI.F.
WORKS
George H. Moody, Proprietor
Has the finest line of Monuments
and all Kinds of Marble Work to
be found in the Inland Empire
PRICES REASONABLE
See Our Work Before Ordering
YOUR
MONEY
Draws interest whes
deposited in this bank.
It earns nothing when
carried around in your
pocket.
FIRST TRUST
& SAVINGS BANK
*
Hotel Moscow
i
Î
TOM WRIGHT, Prop.
Thoroughly Modern
or
FIRST CLASS GRILL
AUTO BUS AT ALL TRAINS j
CLASSIFIED ADS
HELP VVAATED
T'eiuale
WANTED — A COOK AT THE
Lappa Kappa Gamma house
j (Singl e) at on ce.
! WANTED — WOMAN
for sorority house.
Moscow.
WANTED—A POSITION OF BOOK
keepmg and
Star-Mir ror,
WANTED.—A HIGH SCHOOL OR
college girl to do house work after
4 o'clock. Mrs. PI. B. Reed, Phone
317Y- 80-tf
Phone 219. 79-81
AS COOK
Address 624 Uni
80tf
ity Avc.,
typewriting.
Call
77-82
FOR RENT—Rooms
FOR RENT — LIGHT HOUSE
keepmg rooms, close in. 124 South
Almond. Phono 15R.
79tf
FOR RENT.—FURNISHED OR UN
furnished housekeeping
vate bath. Call 45.
rooms; pn
80-tf
FOR RENT — A ROOM WITH OR
without sleeping porch; hot and cold
r atcr; modern conveniences; price rea
, nahe. 425 East Third St. Mrs. D.
qnhart.
13tf
FOR RENT—FURNISHED APART
ments and furnished
Eggan's apartments. Phone 206H.
231-tf
rooms at
APARTMENTS FOR RENT AT
the Idaho Hotel; steam heat. Phone
295.
49tf
FOR RENT — AFTER JAN. 1ST,
two housekeeping rooms, first floor,
modern, 210 First St.
73tf
FOR RENT—Houses
FOR RENT. —7 ROOM HOUSE,
bath, toilet, electric lights, cellar,
good repair, tow blocks from Main
street,
cation.
Patten.
Barn, chicken park, good lo
Rent, $17 per mo. C. H.
78-102
FOR RENT—FIVE ROOM HOUSE
Corner Main and Morton. Phone
1Y. J. E. Mudgett. 44-tf
WANTED—Miscellaneous
WANTED—GOOD LIVE DEALER
to sell the best truck on the market
Can make deliveries 1 to 5 tons. Write
Rochester Motor Co., 1012 Sprague
235-tf
Ave., Spokane, Wash.
WANTED TO RENT—AN OFFICE
desk. Telephone 352.
291-tf
FOR SALE—Real Estate
FOR SALE OR TRADE—205 ACRES
of timber land 8 miles from Moscow;
trade for Moscow property preferred.
Call 201L, Moscow.
58tf
FOR SALE—A 5-ROOM MODERN
residence; good cellar and garage.
Phone 263H. Fred Stone.
16-tf
FOR SALE—8-ROOM MODE R N ;
residence: choice location, corner lot,
garage, etc. Phone 267Y. Sam Silvey.
255-tfc
FOR SALE — HOUSE AND LOT,
corner First and Polk Sts. Inquire
244 tf
Mrs. Wm. Arnett.
FOR SALE—Live Stock
I HAVE A PURE BRED REGISTER
ed Holstein bull, originating from
John L. Smith's herd, Spokane, for
service and sale at Neely's barn ; serv
ice $2.50 in advance; see Mr. Neely at
the barn. E. J. Armhruster.
S9tf
FOR SALE—Miscellaneous
FOR SALE. — SLEIGH RUNNERS
for attaching to buggy or hack.
Practically new. Very serviceable;
price" right. Call 9060.
80-82
FOR SALE.—200 CORDS WOOD,
fir, tamarac and pine, delivered
anywhere in Moscow. E. B. Brock
way. Phone 155J.
79-tf.
2% TONS CHOICE OAT HAY, IN
side city limits, $30 per ton. R. H.
Eves, corner Harrison and Hunter.
77-82
FOR SALE.—AN OFFICE DESK.
Phone 6Y
78-83
FOR SALE.—J. I. CASE 28-INCH
Threshing Machine Outfit. Phone
899X4.
76-101
FOR SALE—ABOUT THIRTY
cords of first class four-foot red
fir wood. $9 cash delivered anywhere
town. Order immediately as wood
scare. Call 88. " "
69-tf
•10LINE - KNIGHT 7-PASSENGER
touring car, in good condition, for sale
r trade. Moscow Auto & Supply Co.
283tf
SELDEN TRUCKS SOLD ON DE
ferred payment plan. Write Rochester
Motor Co., 1012 Sprague Ave., Spo
235-tf
kane, Wash.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST.—A BUNCH OF KEYS. FIND
er please return to W. S. Robbins.
_ 80-85
FOUND—A SET OF SPOONS.
Owner can have same by identifying
property and paying for this ad.
17J.
Call
79-80
MISCELLANEOUS
LIGHT SLEIGH.—PHONE 121Y.
70-84
POTATOES—WE ARE ALWAYS IN
the market ; car-lot quantities ; we pay
cash price. Garfield Fruit & Produce
Go.. Garfield, Wash.
58tf
THE MARK P. MILLER FEED
Yard will open Jan. 1st. Farmers
anyone having teams will be cared
and prices right. Hay and grain
$1.00. Standing team $15c. A nice
warm place and a warm office. Joe
Rivers, Prop. 76-81

xml | txt