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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, January 01, 1919, Image 3

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1919-01-01/ed-1/seq-3/

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Weather—Tonight and Thursday, fair
and continued cold.
Mr. and Mrs. 0. W. Beardsley
tercained at Sunday dinner in honor
of Arvid Anderson, who has just re
turned from overseas and is home on
a furlough. Covers were laid fer
eight. The other guests were Mrs.
J. W. Luallen, Mrs. Nellie Hare, Mrs.
Pearl Brannon, Harry Simpson and
Floyd Olson. - *»* >■ * *
Grant Robbins, who has been home
for the holidays, returned yesterday
• to his work in the ship yards at
Bremerton.
en
s
The new Wirthmor and WellwortH
. , waists are in—$1.50 and $2.50. They
are beautiful.—New fabrics,
styles and colorings.
Mrs. Maud Reeves was an arrival
yesterday from Lewiston.
' Miss Marion Byrnes left yesterday
to take up her studies at Reed Col
lege, Portland. *
Mrs. Nellie Hare left yesterday for
a few days' visit in Spokane.
Mrs. Frank Barkwill and son of Se
attle, who have been spending the
holidays here visiting relatives, left
yesterday for their home.
Lieutenant E. Cook and Lieutenant
Kimbel left yesterday for Spokane.
Superintendent Beckman of the
Washington Water Power company,
was in Moscow yesterday.
Word has been received that War
ren Hull, of Viola, was seriously in
V jured while working at Coeur d'Alene
in a logging camp. His leg was
f> caught between two logs and badly
crushed, probably necessitating ampu
tation.
DAVID 4 ?'
I
I
For Sale—Good quality baled alf
alfa hay at $28.00 per ton at mill,
f Any quantity,
ing Co.
Mrs. R. F. Hazeltine and children
arrived last evening from Spokane to
make an extended visit at the home
H of W. J. Hazeltine.
J. Jacksha came home Igst night
from Spokane, where he has been tak
ing medical treatment.
Miss Marie Corwin of Palouse was
registered Tuesday at the Hotel Mos
cow.
Mark P. Miller Mill
74-tf
John Sampson returned from Ken
drick this morning.
Prof. A. A. Marden went to Pull
man this morning.
Mrs. W. S. Bell and Miss Thelma
Bell left this morning for Spokane
for a week's visit.
Women's and misses' coats reduced
Tomorrow
$1.00 a day until sold,
they are $18.00. Don't wait too long,
your choice may be taken. DAVIDS',
/ Captain Joe Braham of Washington,
V D. C., has been in the city spending the
holidays with friends.
Mrs. G. L. Beckman went to Spo
kane today -to spend the week end
t with Mr.. Beckman's parents.
' Mrs. Pearl Tomlinson and Mrs. J.
C. Mathis of Spokane arrived today
to spend New Years. .with; their gar-,
enté, Mr." and "Mrs. Geo. 'ET. Hârt.
i
Fresh ground green bones for
chickens at Cold Storage Market.
75-tf
Mr. and Mrs. E. S. Doyle of Wal
lace have moved to Moscow to make
their home. Mr. Doyle is employed
as pharmacist for S. L. Willis. Mr,
and Mrs. Doyle have taken apart
ments at the Idaho hotel.
Born, December 22, a son, to Mr,
and Mrs. D. C. Helm of American
ridge.
The new Wirthmor and Wellworth
waists are in —$1.50 and $2.50. They
are beautiful.—New fabrics, new
styles and colorings.
Ray A. Walker of Pullman was a
visitor in Moscow yesterday.
Mrs. O. J. Johnson and children left
this morning for their home at Peck,
Idaho, after a Visit with Mrs. John
son's sister, Mrs. J. I. Headrick, south
of Moscow.
DAVIDS'.
Mrs. B. R. Kinert and Mrs. G. A.
Carder left this morning for Hillyard,
Mrs. Kinert's home. Mrs. Carder will
visit there about a week.
A vigorous childhood if carefuHy
68-tf
guarded will result in a vigorous
manhood or womanhood. Negligence
in permitsting children to eat food
which is hard to digest has brought
stomach and bowel trouble to many
a household. Children are fond of
Oatmeal Blend; it is a wholesome and
nourishing food and easily digested.
Y Ask your grocer for it.
Mr. and Mrs. B. R. Kinert, of Hill
yard, spAit Christmas with Mrs. Kin
ert's parents, Mr. and Mrs. G. A.
Carder.
a
at
the
a
has
ken
and
Dr. Clarke was a passenger last
night to Joel.
Mrs. Myrtle Telford went to Pull
man today for a few days' visit.
Prof, and Mrs. H. H. Conwell left
this morning for Spokane. TJiey will
be away a few days on business and
pleasure.
Lester Bell, who has been mustered
out of the navy service, went to Pull
man today to attend school.
Ivan Williamson went to Juliaetta
last night on business.
Women's and misses' coats reduced
Tomorrow
$1.00 a day until sold,
they are $18.00. Don't wait too long,
your choice may be taken. DAVIDS'.
Had Peculiar Accident.
Last Saturday evening, when Carl
and Roy Smith were going to Pull
man with a motor truck, an accident
occurred about a mile out of Pullman.
The car struck a rock throwing Roy
through the wind shield, cutting his
face very severely. The wounds were
dressed by a physician in Pullman,
sixteen stitches being taken,
returned the same night to Moscow.
Roy is slowly recovering.
■ - - R5 - - -
Ralph Brownlow Heard From.
Ralph Brownlow, formerly linotype
operator in the office of the Idaho Post,
writes from Commercy, France,, on De
cember 10, that the weather is pleasant
and there has been no snow or cold
weather. He expects to be back in the
United States next summer and sends
wishes for a Mery Christmas and Hap
New Year to his Moscow friends.
They
py
I SEATTLE PLANS A
GREAT MEMORIAL
|
I
WILL INVEST $500,090 IN VIC
TORY CATHEDRAL—OTHER
CITIES HAVE PLANS
SEATTLE,
Wash., Dec. 31.—A
$500,000 Victory Memorial Cathedra!
is to be built in Seattle by St. Mark's
Episcopal church in memory of the
American men who served and died
£n France, according to an announce
ment made by Rev. Ernest Vincent
Shayler, rector of St. Mark's parish.
Architects are working on the plans,
the announcement asserted.
I clubhouse; Grays Harbor residents
I are talking of purchasing a bronze
I tablet bearing the name of all men
frcm the harbor country who died in
the service; the Chehalis Citizen's
club is planning a $200,000 community
center building and the Olympia
Young Men's Christian association
has named » a committee to plan a
memorial.
Several Seattle organizations
planning memorials. The University
of Washington alumni may erect a
monument in honor of the under-grad
uates in the service;, the Municipal
League is heading a-movement for
the erection of a memorial hall, and
committees from the Chamber of
Commerce and the Y. M. C. A. are
working together planning for a
memorial. Suggestions have been
made that the committee consider
erecting a $1,000,000 state or recon
struction hospital.
Twelve windows in the cathedral,
according to preliminary plans will be
' named in honor of twelve of the
tions allied in the war with the United
States. Bronze tablets bearing the
names of Seattle men who fell in bat
tle are to be placed in the building.
A Vtctory Tower with chimes has
been proposed.
Steps being taken for the construc
tion of the cathedral are believed the
first definite plans made in the state
for a memorial. Throughout the state
moves are being made to erect
morials but most of the plans are still
in a tentative state.
In Spokane the women's club's
na
me
may
plant trees on school lawns in memory
of the soldiers and sailors; Belling
ham's Father's club is leading a move
ment for the erection of a memorial
are
• I
REV. H. 0. PERRY
METHODIST MINISTER APPOINT
ED TO TAKE CHARGE OF AR
MENIAN RELIEF DRIVE
The executive committee of the
county council of defense, met yes
terday for the purpose of the selec
tion o£ a chairman to take charge of
lhV drive for funds for the people of
Armenia, Syria, Greece, and the refu
gees of western Asia.
One of the large problems of the
reconstruction period is the feeding
and maintenance of these starving in
habitants of the countries of the near
east.
In calling upon the people to sup
port this drive President Wilson
4,000,000 Armenian, Syrian, Greek
and other war sufferers in the near
east will require outside help to sus
tain them through the winter. Many
of them are now hundreds of miles
from their homeland. The vast ma
jority of them are helpless women
and children, including 400,000 or
phans.
The American committee for relief
in the near east is appealing for a
minimum of $30,000,000 to be sub
scribed January 12-19, 1919, with
which to meet the most urgent needs
of these people."
The quota for Latah county has not
been fixed. There is to be a meet
ing of the county chairmen of north
Idaho and eastern Washington, at
It is estimated that about
the Davenport Hotel, on Friday, Jan.
3rd, for the purpose of organizing
and laying plans for making this
drive, which will start Jan. 12th. The
executive committee, after careful
consideration, drafted Rev. H. O.
Perry to handle the drii^e in Latah
county. Rev. Perry will attend the
meeting at Spokane, as Latah coun
ty's representative.
DIRE DISTRESS
It is Near at Hand to Hundreds of
Moscow Readers.
Don't neglect an aching back.
Backache is often the kidneys' cry
for help.
Neglect hurrying to the kidneys'
aid
Means that urinary troubles may
follow.
Or danger of worse kidney trouble.
Here's Moscow testimony.
Mrs. M. Gardner, 924 S. Adams St.,
says: "A severe attack of the grip
settled in my kidneys and for quite
while, my kidneys annoyed me in
many ways. My back became so
weak and lame, I could hardly keep
up and about. I read so much about
Doan's Kidney Pills I got some at
the Economical Drug Co. They did
me a wonderful lot of good, making
my kidneys normal and quickly re
lieving all symptoms of kidney com
plaint. Doan's Kidney Pills did me
more good than any other kidney rem
edy I ever used."
Price 60c, at all dealers. Don't
simply ask for a kidney remedy—get
Doan's Kidney Pills-—the same that
Mrs. Gardner had. Foster-Milburn
Co., Mfgrs., Buffalo, N. Y.
--
Woman Aged 93 is Dead.
Mrs. Helen E. Roberts died last week
her home on American Ridge, at
age of 93 years. Mrs. Roberts was
pioneer resident of Latah, having
settled here about 35 years ago. She
always lived on the homestead ta
up at that time.
She leaves three sons, A. N. Roberts,
Frank and Cyrus Roberts, who live on I
American Ridge ; also 13 grandchildren I
four great grandchildren.
THE DAILY STAR-MIRROR,
FIND BOXFULL OF
ANCIENT RELICS
DISMANTLING OLD BUILDING
IN RENO UNCOVERS PAPERS
DATING FAR BACK
RENO, Nev?—A box left in a saloon
forty years ago, which was stored away
and forgotten until the place recently
was dismanttled, has been turned over
to the police. When opened it was
fovTnd to contain a score of interesting
relics, including a number dating back
to before the signing of the Declaration
of Independence.
The box is believed to have been
the property of Jacob Chamberlain, there
are two land deeds concerning the sell
ing of property in Macomb county, Mich
igan, on the 10th day of August, 1837.
Among the contents is the Boston Ga
zette of March 12, 1770. Numerous
photographs also are among the posses
sions. The pictures were taken in the
eighties by the Elite Gallery of Marys
ville, Calif.
A deed, certificate No. 22,110, was
found concerning the purchasing of land
in G T ew York city and registered by the
general land office in Washington, D. C.
Several letters were found dated in the
spring of 1861, which were sent from
Truckee Meadows, care of the Evans
ranch.
There also were hand paintings, pen
and ink drawings, a number of photo
graphs of friends or relatives, an alma
nac dated 1813, a calendar dated 1816,
antique silverware, and numerous books
of fiction. J
Pren Moore, head of the poultry de
partaient of the University of Idaho,
Raves tomorrow evening for Boise to
attend a meeting of the extension de
partment of the agricultural college aft
cr which he will work for several weeks
in southern Idaho in the interests of
"more and better poultry for the state."
This is part of the campaign that is to be
made state wide for the increase in pro
duction and improvement in quality of
poultry. The campaign has the support
of the government department of agri
culture and Mr. Moore may be assisted
in some of his meetings by E. N. Luce,
government poultry expert for Idaho and
Wyoming.
».
PH MOORE GOES
HEAD OF POULTRY 'DEPART
MENT WILL HOLD MANY
MEETINGS IN IDAHO
From Boise Mr. Moore goes to Cald-
well and will work in that vicinity for
two weeks, after which he goes to Ru-
pert, Twin Falls and Idaho Falls, spend-
ing two weeks at each place. He will
probably return to Moscow before Jan-
uary 26 when poultry will bd discussed
at the farmers week at the university.
- m- -L
Princeton Pioneer Dies.
Thomas Chambers, familiarly known
as "Uncle Tom" by the old settlers
in the Princeton neighborhood, died
at the home of his son, Jeseph Cham-
bers, Monday at noon. The funeral
occurred today, burial being in the
Freeze cemetery. Mr. Chambers was
a pioneer, having settled on what was
later known as Chambers flat, near
Princeton, many years ago. He was
a veteran of the civil war, and was
87 year old. He leaves a wife and
three sons, twin sons living on the
De Smet Indian reservation. They
reached the home of their brother af-
ter the father's death, having made
the trip by automobile.
-;— ..m -
Last Night's Fire.
The fire alarm, which sounded last
evening, about six o'clock, was oc
casioned by a fire at the home of Roy
Nicholson, about two miles west of
Moscow. It was caused by a defective
flue. The house of seven rooms was
burned entirely and only a few articles
of furniture were saved.
The Moscow fire department re
sponded to the call and by 'the use of
chemicals succeeded in saving a near
by out-building. Mr. Nicholson car
ried $1200 insurance on the house.
Sanitary
Plumbing
Deficient plumbing Is never
sanitary, and Is dear at any
price.
Your health or even your life
may depend on the care
given to the laying of a drain
pipe.
Guard Your
Health
We GUARANTEE every piece
of plumbing we do to be
PERFECT before we quit the
job.
PUy gaf»—let n» do
plumbing RIGHT.
your
Witter
Fisher
Company
Phone 230
MOSCOW, IDAHO, WEDNESDAY,
I
United States Sent to Allies
141,000,000 Bushels
of Wheat.
CREDIT DUE TO WOMEN.
Allies Got 844,600,000 Pounds More
Meat and Fats in 1917-18
Than in Year Before.
★ ★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★


★ AMERICAN FOOD SHIPMENTS ★
TO ALLIES





MEAT.
★ 1916-17.2,166,500,000 lbs. ★
★ 1917-18.

3,011,100,000 lbs. *



Increase. 844,000,000 lbs. ★



CEREALS.

★ 1910-17.
* 1917-18.
,259,900,000 bu. *
.340,800,000 bu. ★



Increase... 80,900,000 bu. ★

In spite of a subnormal food supply
In this country the American people
have been able to ship to the Allies
as well ns our own forces overseas
141,000,000 bushels of wheat, besides
844,000,000 pounds of meat, during the
year ending June 30 last. This lias
been made possible by the whole
souled co-operation of the people,
who, besides practicing self-denial,
have speeded up production and re
sponded nobly to the appeal from
abroad.
Food Administrator Hoover, in a
letter to President Wilson, gives a
brief summary of the results of food
conservation in the United States and
of the activities of the Food Admin
istration to this end. The conserva
tion measures have been put through
practically on a voluntary basis which
is regarded as a splendid tribute to
the patriotism of the American people.
Meat shipments were increased 844,
000,000 pounds during the first fiscal
year, as compared with our meat ex
ports during the year before America
entered the war.
"The total value of these food ship
ments," Mr. Hoover wrote President
Wilson, "which were in the main pur
chased through or with collaboration
of the Food Administration, amount
to, roundly, $1,400,000,000 during the
fiscal year."
In 1916-17 the United States sent
the Allies 2,166,500,000 pounds of
ment. In 1917-18, with voluntary con
servation practiced in America, and
aided by extra weight of animals, we
sent the Allies 2,pil,100,000 pounds of
meat, an increase of 844,600,000
pounds.
Wheat Saving Enormous.
When the Food Administration be
gan operations in the summer of 1917,
rids country was facing a large deficit
In wheat. Counting in all carry-over
wheat from the 1916 crop, we had at
the beginning of the 1917 harvest year
just enough wheat to take care of
America's normal consumption,—not a
bushel of surplus.
At the close of the 1917-18 harvest
year the Food Administration's official
reports showed that our total wheat
shipments to the other side had been
141,000,000 bushels,
shipped was ^ wheat saved by the
American people from their normal
consumption.
In cereals and cereal products re
duced to terms of cereal bushels our
shipments to Allied destinations were
340.800,000 bushels, 80,900,000 bushels
more than the amount sent in 1916-17.
Included in these figures are 13.900,
000 bushels of rye and the 141,000,000
bushels of saved wheat. In addition
we sent the neutrals dependent on us
10,000,000 bushels of prime breadstuffs.
"These figures do not fully convey
the volume of the effort and sacrifice
made during the past year by the
whole American people," the Food Ad
ministrator wrote. "I am sure that
all the millions of our people, agricul
tural as well as urban, who have con
tributed to these results should feel
very definite satisfaction that In a
year of universal food shortages in
tlie Northern Hemisphere, all of those
people joined together against Ger
many came through to the new har
vest, not only with health and strength
fully maintained, but with only tem
porary periods of hardship.
"It is difficult to distinguish be
tween various sections of our people—
the homes, public eating places, food
trade, urban or agricultural popula
tions—In assessing credit for these
results, but no ope Will deny the dom
inant part of the American women.
Every bushel
a
SUGAR SHORTAGE HITS
SPAIN AND PORTUGAL
In Spain and Portugal sugar prices
are soaring. Both countries have been
seriously affected by the short beet
sugar crop In Europe and the lack of
ocean tonnage to move stocks of cane
sugar Isolated In far away ports.
Granulated sugar, home grown, was
being sold in Barcelona, Spain, during
the early summer at 19 cents a pound.
The price eff brown sugar in Lisbon,
Portugal, fixed by governmental order,
was $1.04 to $1.12 a pound.
By comparison the price of beet
sugar in Sweden is 14 cents a pound.
'—f W HAWAII HALF A MILLION
äfräsy* --îhÿy 'DNS OFSVOAß Aßt LOADED
TM& tàSti'-A . ONSH/P EACH YEAR.
•*. fOa AMIEHICA .
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CUBAN CANB FIELDS PROVIDE
AMERICA W/TH TWO MILLION
TONS OFSU&AR EACH YEAR.
m
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Q
L.vY':
O VER 75 per cent, of the sugar used in the United
States is delivered by ships. There is produced
about 800,000 tons of beet sugar and 250,000 tons of
cane sugar in Louisiana. The total consumption of the
United States is about 4,500,000 tons of raw sugar, which
makes about 4,250,000 tons of refined sugar.
If our coasts were blockaded as Germany's now are,
we would have available for the use of the people of the
United States only one pound of sugar for every four we
use. Under such circumstances there is no doubt that the
American people would get along on this limited supply
without complaint.
The United States Food Administration is asking
every American household to use not more than two
pounds of sugar per person each month for domestic
use. Reducing our sugar consumption here means that
we will be able to help supply the needs of France, Eng
land and Italy. Sugar conservation on the American
table also means conservation of ships.
The Army and Navy have sent out an "S. O. S." call
for ships. "Save Our Ships to Transport Troops and
Munitions to France, in order that we may keep the fight
ing front where it now is and not allow it to extend to
our own homes," is the message.
There is ample sugar in the world for all require
ments—in fact, there is a large surplus, but on account
of the ship shortage it is not available for use in this
country.
Java, which produces 15 per cent, of the world's
cane crop, ; s too far removed. It requires 150 to 160
days for a ship to go to Java and return.
of
Clyde Campbell Not Dead.
Clyde Campbell, reported "missing
in action" was not killed, as was first
supposed, but was taken to a hos
pital in France. His mother, Mrs.
Ida Campbell received the following
telegram today: "Private Clyde L.
Campbell, infantry, previously report
ed missing in action since October 5,.
is now renorted in. hospital about I
October 5." The telegram is from 1 of
Washington. D. C., and is signed
"Harris, adjutant general."
80
TTieres a Û j
Salesman from
Virginia rfjj
0
U
This is Real
who was chewing and
swapping yams with the
men on the Post Office
corner. "Have a chew,
says he to Jake,
doesn't think he's chew
i ng unless his cheek bulges
out like he had the mumps.
"Call that a chew?" he
snorts. "Sure!" says the
salesman.
Gravely. That small chew
satisfies, and the longer
chew it the better it
tastes. That's whyit doesn't
cost anything extra to
chew this class of tobacco.
you
Jake
It togs further — that's why you
the good taste of this lass of tobacco with •
out extra cost,
ft

PEYTON BRAND
Real Gravely Chewing Plug
each piece packed in a pouch
P-B; GRAVELY TOBACCO CO., DANVILLE, VA'


r
si;
1 9 19
Ü
At the tjireshhold of this New Year,
it is a pleasant
duty to extend to all our friends the Seasons Greet
i
We wish every one health and joy and may
the New Year be a bright and prosperous one.
mg.
r.-;
m
The First National Bank
OF MOSCOW
1882 - 1919
Sr 7 "*
K'
1
-
'
w:
X
Ü
J. S. HECKATHORN, Cashier
W. L. PAYNE, President
Ä»
SSSSSH
(Ms
Notice of Annual Meeting.
The annual meeting of the stockhold
of the First Trust & Savings Bank
will be held at its office in the City
Moscow, Latah County. Idaho, on
2lst day of January, 1919, at three
o'clock in the afternoon, for the elec
tion of five directors to serve for the
ensuing year, and for the transaction
such other business as may properly
come before the meeting:
H. MELGARD, President.

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