OCR Interpretation


The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, January 01, 1919, Image 4

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1919-01-01/ed-1/seq-4/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

ATTEND DANCES
HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS RE
FUSED ADMITTANCE AFTER
TRIP TO PULLMAN
Attending dances is sufficient reason
for barring pupils from the high school
which opened Monday after having been
closed many weeks. This drastic action
was decided upon by the school hoard,
the faculty and the health officers and
put into effect today. Three students
are effected ny tile order,
said to have attended a dance at Pull
man last night and the third is said to
have attended a dance given in Moscow
in violation of the quarantine regula
tions. The health officers are investi
gating and will ascertain why the dance
was given in Moscow during the quar
antine.
After having been closed for many
weeks the high school was opened one
week ahead of the public school in or
der that the senior class might grad
uate. Every precaution was taken to
keep from exposing the pupils any eve
rything else in town, including picture
shows, churches, Sunday schools, pool
halls, lodges and dances were closed
tight for a period of at least one week.
When it was learned that two of the
students had attended a dance at Pull
man the quc.ticn was taken up with
the school and health boards and it
wa« decided to keep them out of school
until all danger of contagion should
be passed. This movement has the sanc
tion of faculty, school board and health
officers.
It is reported that a party was given
near the city limits last night and a
number of school children were plan
ning to attend but the health officer for
bid them being admitted and they were
turned back, the matter is being in
vestigated by the health officer*.
The announcement is made by the
school board that students attending any
public gathering will he barred from
school until such time as it is determined
that there is no danger of contagion, ev
en if this absence from school bars them
from graduating with their class at the
end of the school year.
wo arc
Dr. Adair, city health officer, reports |
a new case of influenza today at the I
home of Jake Hoke, 517 South Jackson ,
street. 1 his is the first case in two
o a 7 s -
I
WILL OPEN MONDAY ,
- I
COEl'R D'ALENE.—The schools of,
Coeur d'Alene will open January 6. At
•a meeting of the school board yesterday
at which Scott, Reed, Carlisle, Beebe
and Superintendent of Schools Buck
were present this decision was made, j
Thc matter of hours in daily sessions
was left entirely with Superintendent !
Buck, who will commence on die same
schedule of hours as maintained Jicfpre
the quarantine. , i
ause some parents may npt, vvjsli to ,
sending their children ito, .school
COEUR D'ALENE SCHOOLS
risl
die compulsory enforcement of ,tiie edu
cational law will he suspended .for . a
of precaution a
reeding out all
As a measure
.time.
trained nurse will work in conjunction
with the teachers in
UNCLE SAM'S PARTNER
"'v
P*
■ Æ
I
<*s
\
7
v!
r
i
t
7 >
^.L
V.
C3 éïS
V.
? >

Irfer#^
SR
)
A
-5ä
/
V*
■ /
M.
fr
SS»
»Vä!S|
A
fer '■
L
Hi
.
v
y.
Sfe
■a/
//)
V K*
D AC
C'
Ï A /,
ki
7
h A
d
■ 'S
d
Vnj

'/■/
w ;r &
V 1
ft
t
miM
^r 1
M\ t
• I
.t:t
k
a
- W
A
s mm
,V,V;
7
f
&
f A
i.

I ■ /
//
j*
V
V
rPM
A
*/
fa
A*
• cP
Ci
j
7/i
¥
>•
N
-
AC*
^ m.
r.
a
La'
V
M
V:
.4
id
'■§
l IV
/i i*
..A
î
■ 1 3J!^
J *V
-A
A
I
0
it
(cl.LIIE 191«)
(Courtesy of Life and Charles Dana Gibso
Planting home gardens, producing more food, and saving food are all war-time effor,'
this government in which the women of America have co-operated Î
home army; the home army hers must .,olp the fighting fences and
120 million Allies must eat.
_ii, r
jyany,
hume a rimes over
We are all il
J influenza.
With these pre
cases
cautions the board expects to keep the
schools open.
The city board of health and the phy
sicians of the city were unanimous in
the belief that the schools should open.
r .
HUNT WILD DOCKS
FHOM AIRPLANES
MINNESOTA PLANNING GAME
L>w« TO PROTECT BIRDS
FROM THESE FLYERS
ST. PAUL, Minn.—Minnesota's game
laws may have to be amended to pro
tect its ducks and geese from a new
menace. State game wardens are con
sidering a suggestion that the legisla
ture be asked to pass a bill this winter
making it illegal to hunt feathered foul
from airplanes.
Minnesota has turned out a great
many aviators, St. Paul and Minneap
olis have been gathering places for stu
dent and expert flyers. It is understood
that some of these airmen who observed
the flight of ducks late this autumn de
cided that the modern hunter will travel
in the air "bus."
From casual discussion the possibil
ity of such hunting has caused state
wide attention. Game wardens believe
that ducks and geese could be slaught
ered by aviators. Therefore, there is a
possibility that the state legislature will
forestall such hunting.
isa
ID HOLD WAR JOBS
FEDERAL INSPECTOR THINKS
NEIGHBORING STATE WILL
KEEP THEM AT WORK
SEATTE.—Washington will not have
to turn many wompn out of their war
time occupations)} Ifelieves Lewrence
Wood, federal director in Washington
for the United States Employment Serv
ice. Seattle railroad officials and oth
ers w | 10 em pl 0 y many women have been
t<?( , recellt i y to the same effect,
Pul) | ic employment officials hope to
ltn d many returned soldiers back to the
soil and let the women keep their pres
ent posts, Mr/ Wood said recently.
"Soldiers who formerly performed light
indoor work will he better men if they
go to the land," he asserted.
"The question of discharging the
women is not very big in this state," Mr.
Wood added. "Washington was just be
ginning to employ women in large irani
hers when the war ended. Compared
with eastern states, our total of cm
ploved women is small. '
Women in Washington replaced men
in practically every occupation, accord
ing to the state labor commission. While
the number was not comparatively large,
the women were placed in many lines,
They were in all the lighter occupations,
clerks, janitors, taxicab drivers, ei
evator operators, meat cutters, laundry
workers, bookkeepers, and waiters. No
record has been found, however, of
'-omen employed as motormen, conduc
tors, policemen or firemen.
Even in occupation classified as "extra
'hazardous" by insurance companies,
women were found. State inspectors
found over 2500 women employed in
Seattle in "hazardous" posts
One Seattle woman, whom officials
say held the most hazardous job 01 all
her sisters, worked in a sawmill riding
factories and
Mills,
a saw carriage,
shops employed scores. They did light
work in sawmills, packed shingles in
shingle mills, operated rip saws in' box
and furniture facorites, worked in ma
chine shops, trucked freight, sorted junk
and steel in steel plants and did light
work around shipyards.
In the railroad offices and along tne
lines women were employed as clerks,
accountants, car cleaners, painters, and
even section hands. Railroads, howev
er, soon found the women not able to
do the heavy section work. Recently
the state insurance commission barred
women from section work.
Most of the women received the same,
or almost the same pay given the men
they replaced. A Washington state law
provides that all women over 18 years
of age must be paid at least $13.20 per
week.
Overalls were not popular among the
Washington working woman. In some
lines overalls were necessary but in
most of the occupations which women
filled they were found wearing their
usual apparel.
DENVER FIREMEN ARE
ADEPT TOY MAKERS
DENVER. Colo.—For a time every
fire station in Denver was a toy shop,
the firemen having turned toy makers
when they were not responding to
alarms to help the Junior Red Cross
Christmas bazaar.
The firemen specialized in- the ma
king of doll furniture and their depart
ment at the bazaar looked like a furni
ture store catering to the wealthy cir
cles of Lillipution society, displayig
velvet-cushioned chairs, hardwood sets,
triple mirrors and numerous other pieces
of work that show unusual skill on the
part of the makers.
Every fireman had a hand in the
work. Those who were not expert wood
workers—for the work required ex
ceptional skill—fdicl the sand-papering
and painting and assisted the others.
Mrs. W. H. Lawes is Dead.
Mrs. W. H. Lawes died this morning
after an illness of several months. She
was the wife of "Billy" Lawes, who, for
many years, has been janitor of Mor
ril hall, of the University of Idaho. She
was a native of England and they were
sweethearts in that country. Mr. Lawes
came to America many years ago and
seven years ago sent for his sweetheart
and they were married and have lived
here ever since. She was a member of
the Rebekahs and Yeomen and these
two lodges will have charge of the fu
neral, the date of which has not been
fixed.
r>
Highway Association Formed.
The Lewis and Clark Highway as
sociation delegates from Clearwater,
Idaho, Lewis and Nez Perce counties
perfected a working organization at
Lewiston recently. Officers were
elected as follows : President, R. C.
Beach. Nez Perce county; vice presi
dent, James Surridge, Idaho county:
secretary, Jesse Adams, Lewiston,
memorial from the association was ad
dressed to the state highway commission
setting forth the fact that the Clearwa
A
ter and its tributaries as traversed by
the early explorations of Lewis and
Clark afford the logical water-grade
route across north Idaho.
VICTOR BERGER
ON WITNESS STAND
( Continued^from page_l)
was a nationalist before an internation
alist.
He said he had been a citizen of this
country for more than 30 years and had
always regarded himself as patriotic, rle
told the jury that he had purchaätd
some of every issue of Liberty bonds
and had been a member of the Red
Cross for many years before the recent
war.
When asked why he had contributed
$10 to the I. W. W. defense fund in
1917, Berger said it was because he
knew they had no money and he thought
they should be given a fair trial.
Was Born ia Austria.
Berger spoke with a strong German
accent, which was explained by his
opening testimony to the effect that
he was born in Austria and was 20 years
of age when he came with his parents
to tlic United States.
•He went to Milwaukee 40 years ago
and for nine years was a public school
teacher. Later he became a writer for
"Vorwaerts," a German language social
ist paper. He said his conversion to so
cialism took place in 1881, He traced
the development the socialist movement
from 1880 to 1897. In the latter year he
and others, he said, organized the pres
ent socialist party.
Says He is Not Pro-German.
The Milwaukee Leader, of which he
is publisher, Berger said, was founded
in 1911 and most of the securities are
owned by workingmen. He sketched
the international socialist movement and
insisted that on several occasion? threats
of the socialists to call a general strike
had averted war. He related the un
successful efforts of international so
cialists to avert the war just closed. He
said he was not pro-German.
"No socialist could be pro-German
or pro-kaiser," said the witness.
Berger said that the prohibition party
platform was essentially
against war as the socialist platform.
Berger said that he did not approve
of the Young People's Socialist league.
He also said he never knew of any code
letters nor of an underground route to
Mexico for slackers.
I
as strong
a
to
C.
Answer to Ruth L. Gray "Barrage."
I have been sitting back, as you
might say in the dark, listening to,
and reading those little editorials
which have been appearing lately in is
The Star-Mirror, contributed by one
Miss or Mrs. Ruth L. Gray, and I
think it about time I had something to
say, in reply to this matter, for the
simple reason that I, for one, am not it
in favor of having the soldiers trod
upon, or run down, as she is. trying the
to do. I am a soldier-contributor, and 1
am not one of those "tin-horn" kind 1 his
+*♦+++*+*>+*+*****

' ♦
*
CONTRIBUTION BOX


*
31
?JTI
/
Flour, Coal
Mill Feed
s
The Moscow Union Warehouse Company has just received an
. other carload of the celebrated
PRIMROSE HARDWHEAT FLOUR
äj
K
From the Townsend Mills at Townsend, Montana. We had been un
able to get this flour for a time, but now have a large supply of it. This
flour has given splendid satisfaction. Try a sack of it.
COAL and WOOD
Another large supply of that splendid coal that has given such
good satisfaction. Another lot of excellent wood and a good supply
of posts now on hand.
aril
EE i
it
MILL FEED
Another big shipment of mill feed just received. This is the best
and cheapest feed for cows and hogs at this time of year.
GROCERIES
The Farmers Store has received a fresh supply of Staple and
Fancy Groceries and a fine assortment of Dainties for the New Year's
dinner. ALWAYS THE BEST GOODS AND LOWEST PRICES.
i
Farmers' Union
Warehouse Co
ft
y
!r
intent
either. I have seen actual service
in France, on the Soissons front, and
at Chateau Thierry, in June and July
of this year, and so, therefore, know
what I am talking about, or I would
keep my mouth shut, and duck out
of sight when a "barrage" of that
class came over, to keep from being
hit. But, oh, no, I am not going to
do that; I am right up and at it agafn;
I am not afraid of being hit by such
as that, it just puts me in mind of a
large German shell whizzing over
one's head, to finally come to earth,
burying itself in about six feet of
good old soil, to never come to light
again. But I suppose I had better
get down to the fine points of this
little article, or the readers will get
the impression that I am following
too closely in the foot-steps of some
other writer, who seems to be well
known in Moscow.
I noticed that this one, Ruth L.
Gray, desired to impress upon the
minds of the public that if a soldier
says anything in a way of protecting
himself or his rights, is a "slacker."
I am just wondering if she really
slacker"
knows what the word
I can say she does not. This
means.
lady may, or may not be, a highly
educated person, that is not for me
to say, but let me say this: that this
war, or any other war, previous to
this time, was never won by flowery
language, or base balls and bats,
for one, never had the time to play
base ball during my time in the serv
ice. If I had wanted to play base
ball/1 would have joined some big
league and tried to dodge the serv
ice—that's what I call a "slacker—
but instead, I enlisted in the Ameri
can army more than a year ago, and
served six months "over seas" with
the 306th Co. A Machine Gun Division
and came back in the 33rd Engineers.
I was knocked out on the 27th of
July, last, at Chateau Thierry just
before the second battle of the Marne.
went in the army to fight, and learn
army life and to be loyal to my
"country," the good old U. S. A.
had no time to play bas ball, as I
have said before. This war was won
by guns and brains, not balls and bats,
and I know what I had to endure in
this struggle and the hardships and
dangers which I had to face. At all
times my life was indanger, but I
was fighting for home and freedom,
for the freedom of the U. S. A., and
lasting world-peace, and now I come I
back to my own country "disabled" and
be branded as a "slasker"—that's
my pay for fighting for democracy—
and yet I am not considered as a
hero, but instead, the beloved Y. M.
A. secretary is the hero, and the
only hero.
And let me say right here, and in
plain English, that I have no time for
the Y. M. C. A. From what I have
seen personally, and learned "over
there" is enough to convince me which
the best. Was it the beloved Y.
secretary who took care of me on
that 27th'day of July, last? No, it
was not. It was the Red Cross, the I
"beloved Red Cross.". And who wasj
that gave me my smokes, candy,
coffee and doughnuts ?—Again
beloved Red Cross, the flaming
Red Cross, which every soldier puts |
all, and trust in—the greatest
I
i
"mother" in all the world.
And then, there's the K. of C. and
the Salvation Army which are also in
eluded with the Red Cross and théir
great work. One has no authority to
say or know anything about this or
that by sitting here in the U. S. by
their pleasant fire-places while the
rest of the world over there on the
other side is drenched in blood and
conflict. The way to know these
things is to be present there; to see
your comrades fall by your side,
withering under the icy hands of
death, and to see those who are car
ing for those boys. I know who cared
for me, It was the Red Cross and
the Salvation Army,
And now, just a little more. I am
not the soldier, who you claimed, had
contributed an article to the paper and
for some reasons unknown, refused
to have his name known. I am also
not hiding behind a woman's skirt or
an infant's robe to conceal myself; but
instead, I am coming out in the open
and making a bayonet charge for my (
own rights and protection, and am
| °P en and free to converse with any
I one at any time on this matter and
| would be glad to do so, but to be
termed as a slacker is one thing I
can not tolerate.
find that I meant nothing of such a
nature,
if we had not had the greatest consid
eration for our soldiers, that we would
not be so willing for my father to go
overseas to labor for their comfort—
as that is his sole purpose abroad.
However, my article as a whole,
was to defend the Y. M. C. A. (which
is interested in the soldiers) from
what I consider an unjust attack upon
the organization. As to the unrefined
manner in which your editor ridiculed
me, I shall make no comment what
ever, for as well as I am known in
Moscow, I do not believe it necessary
to do so. I trust that you will give
this space in your paper, as I take
this means of righting an impression
that was falsely conveved.
Respectfully,
RUTH L. GRAY.
Sincerely yours,
CLARENCE E. ROUTH.
Jan. 1, 1919.—Mr. Lamphere, Mos
cow, Idaho, Dear Sir.—I wish to say
a few words in regard to the manner
in which my previous communication
was criticised by your editor.
The impression taken from my ar
ticle regarding the soldiers, is entirely
different from the one I wished to
convey. To say anything uncompli
mentary against our soldiers, is the
last thing I would think of doing, or
the last thing that I would wish, to
hear anyone do.
I am very sorry if that part of my
article was taken as a charge against
all soldiers. No one has a more pro
found respect and admiration for our
soldiers than I have. But there ARE
a few slackers—every one knows
that and on one admires them. That
was the type I referred to and did
not mean that every one who did not
agree with my views was a slacker.
I believe if any one who thot I meant
such a thing will just read that part
of the article over and give it a little
more careful consideration, they will
lt stands to reason does it not, that

xml | txt