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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, January 08, 1919, Image 1

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The Daily Star-Mirror
MOSCOW. LATAH COUNTY. IDAHO WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 1919
VOLUME VIII
NUMBER 8fi
SENATE PUSSES
*
IDAHO IS THIRD STATE TO
RATIFY MEASURE THIS
SESSION
t
BOISE.—The senate this morning,
as its first act, passed the prohibi
tion ratification resolution. Senator
Whitcomb asked to be excused from
voting, while Senator St. Clair said
he was against it, but voted for it on
account of his constituents.
Both houses passed resolutions eu
logizing former President Roosevelt.
The resolutions read in part as fol
lows:
remodeling and revising the plans and
purposes of our government and in
bringing home to the people the need
of civil righteousness."
Idaho is the third state to ratify
the prohibition amendment at this
present session, and the seventeenth
He was the chief factor in
in the United States.
W. L. Adamson, from Blaine county
was elected floor leader of the ma
jority in the caucus last night.
There was a memorial service in
honor of Colonel Roosevelt this after
noon at two o'clock. Those who spoke
were Judge Dietrich, of the federal
court, Former Governor Hawley, Sen
ator Lloyd Adams, and Representa
tive Givens.
i
Entente Conference Begins.
PARIS.—Informal conferences with
the entente statesmen in order to lay
the real ground work for the peace
congress will begin Thursday. Prob
ably this will be President Wilson's
only official activity prior to the be
ginning of the peace conference, as it
is necessary for him to get some rest
after the fatiguing round of speeches
and traveling.
There seems now to be excellent au-
thority for saying that plans for a set-
tlement of the most important ques-
t'ons.—namely, the league of nations,
the freedom of the seas, and disarma-
ment,—still seem very indefinite.
-ua
Attack Expected Hourly.
BERLIN.—The Spartacan forces are
this morning being massed in several
places where weapons and armed mot
or cars have been concentrated,
government fordes are awaiting an at
tack in Wilhelmstrasse.
Spartacans Receive Snub.
BERLIN.—The Spartacan delegation!
today endeavored to confer with the !
government, and was notified by gov- j
ernment members that it could not]
r,
t
The
I
discuss any matters until all public
and private buildings now occupied
by the counter revolutionists had been
vacated.
_ ... . « ,
il ar ( ertilicates issued.
the^freasury^oday" announced The is
suance of a block of'treasury war cer
tificates o.f indebtedness, to an indef-1
inite amount. They will be date Jan
uary 15 and wil mature Juno 17. They
tear 4 1-2 per cent interest.
—- T . " ' "
Casualty Lists Arrive.
WASHINGTON.— Complete lists of
casualties among the American Expe^-,
../Mi
Washington, and one thousand addi
tional clerks have been put to work in
the adjutant general's office to get
them out as speedily as possible.
- SJ; -
Proclamation Issued.
i BOISE.—Governor Davis late Tues
day afternoon issued a proclamation
i declaring AVednesday a legal holiday
and asked that public offices be closed
and business suspended in the state
for one hour beginning at 12:45, in
memory of Colonel Theodore Roose
velt.
•IF!
been
itionary forces have
FA
Se veral Hundred Killed.
LONDON.—Several hundred persons
Rave been killed in Berlin in fighting,
according to an Exchange telegraph
dispatch from Copenhagen. At 2 o'clock
this morning no details had as yet
been received. The government seems
at least provisionally master of the
Early Thursday morning
the government moved the troops out
side the city, which, the dispatch says.
General
situation.
they are now ready to enter.
Hindenburg is reported to have
von
arrived in Berlin.
COPENHAGEN. — Nicholi Linine,
Boshevist Russian premier, has been
arrested at the command of Leon
Trotzky, minister of war marine, who
has made himself dictator, according
to a Moscow dispatch to the Gothem
burg Gazette of Sweden,
sired a eolation with the Mensheviski
Moderates, and Trotzky wished to
continue the reign of Red Terror, the
dispatch states.
Lenine de
or
REPORT NEW USES
HEALTH OFFICER HAS THREE
FAMILIES ON LIST OF
QUARANTINED
Dr. W. A. Adair, city health of
ficer, today brought to the Star- Mir
- for the names of three new families
in which thè influenza has made its
appearance since Sunday.
At the Anderson home on East
Sixth street there is one case.
At the Arnold Lyon home on Dea
kin Avenue, a case developed on Mon
day.
Yesterday, Mrs. Carrico, who lives
•on the corner of Jackson and 6th
street, reported that nearly all of her
six children were bedfast with the
disease.
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OYSTER BAY.—The body of Theo
: dore Roosevelt was laid to rest today,
It was committed to the earth at 1.43
.'o'clock this afternoon, in the family
j cemetery plot overlooking Long Is
j land Sound.
The final services were witnessed
j by mem b ers 0 f the family, a few
^ f r j en( j Sj the congressional delegation,
| and a group of 200 neighbors, includ
ing many school children who had as
! sembled at the grave while the serv
j ; ceg were j n progress.
Ag tbg congrega tion standing out
doors recited the Lord's prayer, it
J
UNCLE SAM TO HOLD
BIG BARGAIN SALE
3000 HEAD OF HORSES AND MULES
TO BE DISPOSED OF
REASONABLY
According to a bulletin issued by
the Remount Division of the United
States Army, there will be sold at
public autcion at Camp Lewis on the
10th of the month approximately 3000
head of horses and mules.
These animals are being sold be
cause the government has no further
use for them and not because the ani
mals are worn out. The sale is at
tracting a great deal of attention be
cause many excellent bargains will
doubtless be found in the lot and all
animals, it is expected, aie to be sold
at reasonable figures.
A number of men who are interested
in stock raising in the Palouse coun
try have gone to the coast in the ex
pectation of making purchases
prices are right.
HOSPITAL IS NOW READY
University Has Equipped Private
House for Emergency Cases.
The hospital which has been pre
pared for university students in _ the
event of any of them showing signs
of influenza is all ready, but tho the
fires are laid, and the last smooth
pillow placed upon the beds, there are
so far no patients.
In order to protect the students, the
university has rented the Aldrich
house on the edge of the campus and
has equipped it for emergency cases.
INSPECTOR LEWIS ARRIVES
Col. Thomas J. Lewis, of the In
spector General's department of the
United States army, arrived in Mos
cow today and is making the regular
annual inspection of the military de
partment of the university, and of
the accounts of the disbursing officer,
Lieutenant Hale.
Colonel Lewis will be a guest of
Captain and Mrs. Felker at dinner
University Military Department Ex
amined By Officer.
this evening.
was noted that Captain Archibald
Roosevelt stood directly behind the
clergyman at the head of the grave.
Fermer President Taft stood at the
^ family^ R °° Se -
The congressmen and the people of
Oyster Bay assembled directly behind
the delegation of Rough Riders at the
foot of the grave.
Tonight soldiers, as a guard of
honor , will do sentry duty at the
grave under the command of Lieuten
a nt Reynolds of the army medical
corps, long a personal friend of the
ex-president. _
-
MAJOR FOOKS MAY BE LIVING
held out that'
Mistake May Have Occurred in Cas
ualty Lists.,
Strong hopes are now
Major Fooks, whose death was re
ported in the casualty lists in De
cembr, is alive and making progress
towards recovery from his wounds.
Friends with whom he corresponds
in Moscow state that they have let
ters written by him as late as De
cember 12, and that the announcement
of his death, which was made De
cember 18th in this country, could
not have been received here by that
date if he was alive on December 12th.
Major Fooks has a host of friends
in Moscow who will rejoice deeply to
get this encouragement to believe
that he is living.
SLOAV DECEMBER WAS BETTER
THAN MORE CREEE ON DOORS
"New York City didn't close the
schools ? and theaters be
And look at New
churches,
cause of the 'flu.'
York."
That's what critics
It Usually Happens About This Time
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vicinity of Sagamore Hill, at Christ
church and at ï oung s Memorial
ce l?l eter y; ... , j r
Many tried to enter the grounds of
the Roosevelt estate, but mourned po
lice, special deputy sheriffs, and de
tectives kept them "'oving. Only im
mediate members of the family at
tended the prayer service at the home
prior to the church service. _'
~
health rules were saying a few days
OYSTER BAY.—The body of Theo
j chïrT before^
| 0 > c ] 0c k today and simple funeral serv
| ; ce s, were immediately begun. Long
1 before the hour ' silent crowds of vil-1
lagers and visitors collected in the
ago. Health Commissioner Copeland
was quoted as showing that New
York's death rate was "much lower
than in cities that ordered closing";
and I* 16 conclusion was not flattering
o the judgment of Spokane.
Now the figures are given out; and
"look at New York."
The death rate in New York City
rose from 15.2 per 1000 population
in 1917 to 18.8 in 1918—an increase of
3.6. The death rate In Spokane rose
from 8.09 per 1000 in 1917 to 10.23 in
1918—an increase of 2.14.
To make it a little plainer: If Spo
kane had followed New York's plan!
peopleteeJe 0 wolld 1 be173 XI Sves
« ^ tha "*"
Did the board of health know its
business? Does it know its business
now when it counsels the people to
keep on using caution and common
sense?—Spokane Chronicle.

Mrs. Addle Perry arrived today from
Coeur d'Alene where she was called by
the death of her daughter-in-law, Mrs.
I
INTELLIGENCE TESTS TAKEN
Department of Psychology Applies
Army Questions to Four
Sections.
The intelligence tests which were
taken yesterday at the university will
be productive of much interesting in
j formation and discussion when the
I results of the scoring are announced.
( The regular army tests were made of
j all students and of many members of
1 the faculty by the department of psy
| chology at the university. The stu
I dents were divided into four sections
i and the test for each continued one
hour. The score cards, it is expected,
! will be ready tomorrow.
.
fT'\
l
JAY GIBSON NAMED TO IMPORT
ANT POSITION BY GOVERNOR
D. W. DAVIS
It will occasion little surprise in
Moscow when the announcement is
made public that Jay Gibson, banker
of Coeur d'Alene and son of the former
mayor of Moscow, has been named
bank commissioner by Gov. Davis.
It is understood that the new bank
commissioner recently sold out his in
terests in the northern Idaho city.
During the past few years Mr. Gibson
had been cashier of the bank in which
D. W. Davis was heavily interested in
American Palls. When (Governor
Davis was a candidate for election
two years ago, Mr. Gibson was very
active in the campaign. He is an ex
perienced banker and thoroughly fa
miliar with all sections of Idaho and ]
all phases of Idaho business. j
It was also announced that the chief i
executive had selected Miles Cannon
of Weiser to head the farm markets |
bureau, the place formerly held by
Harvey Allred. Mr. Cannon is one of
the best-known farmers in the state
and Is a large operator. His appoint
ment came as a complete surprise.
BANQUET ARRANGED
The joint banquet given annually
b the chamber of commerce and the
University on the last day of Farmers'
Week will be a bigger and better af
fair than ever before, to judge by the
enthusiasm with which tj*e commit
tee ha's assumed its duties. The vice
p res ;j en t and trustees have named
A H Qversmith, chairman, H. H.
gj'mpgou an( } T. A. Meeker to serve I
with a representative group from the ;
university, of which C. C. Vincent is j
chairman.
s -,
kj0INT
Committee Will Entertain Farmers on
February 7 at Big Affair.
j
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Pa
R, S.
SENDS NEINS OF SONS
j
A let ter received from R. S. Mat
^tim^past. SÂÏ
men who have entered service.
Mr. Matthews, at one time the effic-•
lent mayor of Moscow, has decided |
that it is too cold for him in AViscon
sin and he has recently moved to San
ni eirn California, to make his home
vvith his son, Lieut. David Matthews,
who is stationed at Rockwell Island,
Lieut. Mathews is in the aviation serv
ice, and will take additional trainng
MATTHEWS WILL LEAVE
WISCONSIN FOB SUNNY
UAL1EORMA
j there for the next nine months.
i Dr. John Matthews is extremely busy
with the influenza epidemic, as there
are many cases in his city.
Captain Jewett D. Matthews is still
He is attached to the 112th,
overseas.
Field Artillery*
Mr. Matthews concludes his letter
by tbe very pleasant news that he can
not get along without The Star-Mir
ant that he reads every word ol
I ror
! it, even the advertisements.
*
Only Sixteen More States Necessary
to Amendment
_
Three more states having ratified
dry" amendment, only sixteen
I more states need to lineup in order to
I make the nation a prohibition country,
i i That there will be continued fighting
j ( by distillery interests is indicated.
1 UNITED STATES IS GOING DRY
the
F
;
t Troops Coming Home.
'•'WASHINGTON. — Assignment for
early convoy home of additional units
of the American Expeditionary forces
has been announced by the war de
partment today. The number totaling
about 10,000 will include the 131st,
tile 132d, the 133d, Field Artillery, and.
the 11th ammunition train of the 36th
division.
I,
\ew Year's - ;kti. .G 5$ 44)440
Moscow and Latah county are about
ito enter upon the most strikingly pros
perous year in their history, if the
prophecies of some of the principal
citizens of the community are to be re
alized. The favorable fall, the guar
anteed prices for the chief product of
this region, and the advent of peace
have built up in every mind the
strongest confidence that we are to
enjoy a bright and happy new year.
What some of the leading men of the
community think in regard to what
business may expect will be of interest
to all who have the welfare of this
locality at heart.
J. S. Heckathorn of the First Na
tional bank; "We look for a good
year. The prospects for a full crop
are exceedingly fine, and with the
price guaranteed, this country will
certainly be in good shape for next
fall. We look for one of the best years
we have had recently. War time
prices are uncertain, but mercantile
business will be good with fair prof
its. The county is fortunate in hav
ing a farming community, since we are
not subject to the labor conditions of
the the We
istic for the outlook of the coming
year."
Harry Whittier of the Moscow State
Bank: "I am not ordinarily of the
optimistic turn of mind, but for the
present outlook of the new year, I am
exceedingly so. We have better pros
pects than we have ever had. The rea
sons are the high prices with the
sound condition of the country gen
erally and the return to normal times.
Idle capital will now be invested that
awaited the end of the war. This will
bring prosperity to the whole country
and of course to Latah county, too."
h. Melgard of the,First Trust & Sa
vings bank: "Our prospects all de
pend on the crop conditions and they
are g 0O d. We are optimistic for a
g 0 od year. The high prices will re
t arc j that will be realized grad
ually. Some improvements in Moscow
will be held back for a little time to
test conditions in the future, but the
surrounding country farms will begin
their improvements at once. The corn
j ng year will be prosperous."
Mr. Creighton : You may say for me
that I am just chuck full of optimism.
many
planted as we did this year and we
never got the crop in under such fine
conditions. Now comes this snow on
top of it to protect the grain,
the prospects for spring are wonder
ful. AVe have had a remarkable holi
day business. Notwithstanding the
fact that the government took over
two million dollars' worth of bonds
from this county, notwithstanding the
influenza, the closing out sales, and
the war, we have had the biggest busi
ne ss this fall we have ever had.
look for a good year next year. In
f ac t j know we shall have a good year,
Why,
Homer David: "We anticipate a
good year. Our past year's business
has been excellent, and the coming
year will be better. The epidemic has
not affected our business during the
past two months, and now peace is
here, people are saying, 'AVe will now
buy what we have wanted.' There is
great prosperity ahead with an excel
lent crop outlook. The high prices
(will be reduced gradually. The people
!are well fixed in Latah county and the
year holds prosperity for us all."
"I regard this as
the easiest time that ever existed for a
merchant to make money,
pert up energy that has been held
up by the war will now be released.
Farmers will take up the good roads
proposition. There will be good busi
pr "&ou?' thte° sduringthe war
JJ Zne^Xy ZÏ ? laveT Moscow
HSSt'K.*
T .. ... .
C. L. Butterfield. The prospects
are most excellent tor the present sea
son. There bids fair to be a big or i
(and with the prevailing prices, monev
will be plentiful. AVitb plenty of mon
ey, merchandising ought to show a
most satisfactory outcome."
Geo. Sievers of the Farmer's Store;
"There are good prospects ahead. The
N. Williamson :
All the
government is prepared to carry out
its arranged plans and with the wheat
price fixed we will have good times. A
I good crop is expected and all signs
I are favorable for a good time and
good returns for the year."
j ENROLMENT IS SATISFACTORY
j . -
>i ore Than 425 Students in Attend
ance at First Sessions of new
Quarter.
Regular classes were held at the
university for the first time today,
and the attendance was extremely
gratifying to those who are interested
in seeing a large enrollment. In
Freshman English, which is a requir
[ ed subject, 220 pupils were present;
; and as this class is always less than
half the enrollment, it would be a con
servative estimate to state that the
total number of students to date was
in excess of 426. _
not, of course, include any short
course students.
These figures do
Four Ships Leave,
WASHINGTON. - The transport,
Presideift Grant, and the battleships
Montana, South Dakota, and the hos
pital ship Comfort, have left France
for New York with 284 officers and
7419 men aboard.

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