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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, January 09, 1919, Image 2

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1919-01-09/ed-1/seq-2/

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The DAILY STAR-MIRROR
Published every evening except Sun
day, at Moscow, Idaho.
GEO. N. LAMPHERE, Publisher.
The Official Newspaper of the City of
Moscow.
Entered as second-class matter Oct.
Ä6, 1911, at the postoffice of Moscow,
Idaho, under the Act of Congress of
March, 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Deliverd by carrier to any part of city:
Month .60c
.$1.50
. 2.76
. 6.00
Per
Three Months
Six Months ..
One Year ....
By Mail
a utside of city and on rural routes):
r Month .MOc
.$1.16
.2.26
.4.00
Three Months .
fix Months .
àne Year .
The (Weekly) Idaho Post:
gfcr Year $1 50
-I
SJEMBER OF ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively
«titled to the use for republication
*f all news-dispatches credited to it
•r not otherwise credited in this paper
published
•nd also the local news
therein.
All rights of republication of
•fecial dispatches herein are also re
served.
RETURNING SOLDIERS.
Almost every day the Star-Mirror
contains an item or two aobut this
or that soldier who has returned from
overseas duty to take up civilian life
again at his home in Latah county
These young men who have risked
everything for their country's wel
fare, who have left their positions,
their friends, and their own selfish in
terests far behind them and have de
voted every thought and every hour
to the military duty prescribed for
them by their government, slip into
town without greeting and without
welcome or congratulation upon their
safe return.
To them it must seem a cold and
Indifferent community to which they
return; No one seems to know when
they are coming. No one is at the
train to thank them for their record
of devotion to duty, to express an in
terest in their welfare, and to offer
them any needed assistance in locat
ing friends and families.
Perhaps few boys who return to
Latah county need material aid. Most
of them are not broke, probably, and
they still have the price of hot coffee
and sandwiches if they are hungry
when they arrive in town. But there
is something a great deal better and
more important to the average Indi
vidual than meat and drink, and that
is friendship.
Moscow is not indifferent to these
young men. She showed herself their
warm and interested friend when they
left, and she sent each one away with
a little memento of good-will and in
terest. But she has done nothing to
show them that she is still as deeply
concerned as she ever was in their
prosperity and happiness.
The influenza ban does not permit
gatherings or public demonstrations
for all the boys at one time. But
there could surely be some plan form
ulated by which the trains would be
met and the boys greeted and made
welcome.
If the business of meeting all trains
were divided among a large group of
people by some well devised plan, and
?f every soldier who gets off a train
here could be assured of the hand
clasp of a cordial citizen, Moscow
would be doing better than she is
doing right now by her home-coming
•warriors.
te fas te
FINANCIAL REPORTS.
Although the American people are
notoriously indifferent to the details
of the administration of their govern
ment whether In the nation, the state,
the county, or the city, yet there are
striking evidences now and again that
•there is a very decided anixiety to
know just how their money Is ex
pended.
As a case In point, the people of this
city would like very much to learn
what becomes of the taxes paid into
the city treasury. It is pretty well un
derstood that there is a budget for
each of the several departments ahd
that a given sum Is set aside annually
for the administration of these depart
ments. But as to whether the city gov
ernment is costing the community less
or more than formerly; as to whether
the people are getting more or less
for their money than they used to get;
as to just what proportion of the'clty's
income is devoted to a given purpose:
as to whether the corporation iç. bet
ter or worse off at the end of a given
month than it was during the cor
responding month of the previous year
—as to all these facts the people of
Moscow entirely
The Star-Mirror is in a pqsition to
state that the people of this community
are not indifferent to these matters,
o»t they would ..he . very deep
interest, as they do in bank statements,
in scrutinizing at their leisure the rec
ord of city finances published period
. ,, ,, .
ically and officially, as .hey were for
many years.
This would be an expenditure which
the people would heartily endorse as
, ._._for
they have no other means of knowing
how the government for which they are
putting up the money is expending
their cash.
P? sa pa
In the death of Hiram Gill of Seat
tle the curtain is rung down on one
of the most spectacular and dramatic
careers of a state replete with histor
ies that are striking and bizarre.
Mr. Gill was first elected mayor
on the policy of a wide-open town.
people
of the
The
community became so. outraged by the
results that they recalled him.
Gill, then pretending conversion, got all
the ministers of the city to proclaim I
him a brand snatched from the burn
conservative
Mr.
on a platform of opposition to all forms
of vice. But the protection of the sa
ing. They invited him to occupy their
pulpits and brought about his election
. „ ... .. „ , , , , ,
tions in Seattle finally brought about
the ban placed upon the city by Gen
eral Green. Long before his term was
, , , . ......
how the >' had been du 0 ed int0 bellev -
ing in his false professions of a change
0 f heart, and they defeated him when
he ran for office the fourth time.
loon interests continued, and condi
concluded the church people realized
P® Sa Sa
GOOD READING.
Excellent as has been the work of
Booth Tarkington in the past, none
of it, in the opinion of the writer,
equals in truth to life and interest
ing portrayal of character, a recent
story of his which ran last year as
a serial in one of the magazines and
which has lately appeared in book
form.
The novel, which is called
"The Magnificent Ambersons," deals
with the origin and development of
the automobile and the effect of the
|
j
j
j
;
society of the middle west. Any one
who has any acquaintance with life
as it was lived in a fair sized city of
this region urging the nineties, will
appreciate the fidelity and grace with
which the author has portrayed the
period.
The story is far from thrilling or
sensational. It will attract readers
who are interested in a well-told nar
rative of typically sound and attractive
American family life.
Ps Ss pa
LIVE AND LEARN OR DIE AND
LEARN.
After an experiment with lifting the
Influenza ban, many towns in Idaho
have decided that the advantages of
public assemblages do not outweigh
the increase of victims of the disease.
Wallace, Kellogg, Emmett, Caldwell,
Boise, Nampa, and many other places
have just passed ordinances by which
the health officers require a stricter
observance of the quarantine than ev
er before.
THE GREATEST AMERICAN.
The greatest American of his gen
eration, perhaps of any generation,
has been honored by tributes such
as no citizen of this or any other
land has ever before received. Spon
tanous and sincere to the last degree,
the testimonials to Colonel Roose
velt's worth, rushing in from all over
the world, have surpassed in enthusi
asm and laudatory spirit those so far
pad to the mighty of the earth.
Count von Bernstorff is reported to
be working daily In the Berlin foreign
office, preparing data for the peace
conference. He is an enthusiastic sup
porter of the league of nations idea,
favors giving up universal military
service, and advocates strongly a most
complete disarmament. This endorse
ment should be sufficient to make eve
ry member of the allied forces deeply
suspicious of the merits of any one of
those three schemes of peace adjust
ment. As a wolf in sheep's clothing,
von Bernstorff has been the best lit
tle piece of camouflage we have heard
anything about.
Ka «
Those who have exoended fair-sized
fortunes on acquiring education and
training for professional life may di
"Since using 'More Eggs' I get 40
to 50 eggs a day instead of 8 or 9,"
*£&£!£ Ü. ï.ïe
big , egg pro fits for thousands of
poultry raisers all over the U. S. Get
ready now and make big profits out
-££ {g- ÆhSS*5w prÄ,"
b j on an( j a m iHi 0 n dollar bank guar
antees to refund your money if you
are not entirely satisfied. Send $1.00
now to E. J. Reefer, the poultry ex
per ^ 233 Main Street, Kansas City,
Mo., or send $2.26 and get 3 regular
$1.00 packages on special discount
for a full season's supply. Or write
his valuable FREE book that tells
eX p er j ence 0 f a man who has
made a fortune out of poultry.
gest with what philosophy they can
summon the fact that, while the aver
age person following a learned profes
sion is glad to earn three thousand
dollars a year, the junk men of the
country are paying income taxes on
from $7000 to $15,000.
Was it not thrilling to the imagina
tion of every American reader—that
picture, as the dispatches gave it, of
a group of airplanes high over Saga
more Hill, keeping ceaseless vigil
over the home where lay the body of
American father whose son had
fallen in air combat?
an
V
50 Eggs a Day
DROVE AMBULANCE IN FRANCE
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Mrs. Wagstaff, poet and traveler,
provided herself with a mechanic's
license before sailing for - France,
where she drove an ambulance for the
American Order Aid hospital.
USE OF MOONSHINE IS
CAUSING INSANITY
Huntington, W. Va. —Use of
moonshine whisky is spreading
insanity throughout West Vir
ginia, according to J. B. Coster
of the state Insane asylum. In
sanity is epidemic in the coal re
gions of Logan county, Coster
says. All kinds of ingredients
are used in the manufacture of
the whisky and much of it, ac
cording to the asylum officials,
wrecks mind and body.
MUSIC CURES SHELL SHOCK
*
Victims in England Recover Speech
Under the Influence of
Singing.
London.—Music has been found to
be beneficial in the treatment of sol
diers suffering from shell shock, and
now singing is to he tried on'a sys
tematic scale, with the approval of the
army authorities.
It has been found that singing has
both directly and indirectly a won
derful curative effect and there are a
number of cases on record in which
a man who, unable to speak, suddenly
joined In with the singing and so re
covered his speech.
An effort Is being made to organize
regular singing training 'in all hos
pitals where there are shell-shock
cases.
W. I. & M. Changes Schedule.
POTLATCH, Jan. 9.—The
schedule of the W. I. & M. goes into
effect today and instead of one train
a day there will be one in the fore
noon leaving at 9:15 making it pos
sible to connect with the Northern
Pacific, which leaves Palouse at 12:01
p. m., and an afternoon train leaving
Potlatch at 3:20 p. m., which connects
with the Inland leaving Palouse at
4:05 p. m. There will be no trains
on Sunday.
new
INTERESTING FACTS
All relief for Armenians and Syri
ans is sent in the form of; money
credits. Owing to the difficulties of
transportation it is impossible to ship
food or clothing.
Supplies are purchased on the open
market by relief distributors. .
Food, though scarce, can be secured
W 1 "' money is available.
Audited reports are filed with the
representatives of the American gov
1 eminent in Constantinople, the Swed
ish ambassador now acting in that
capacity.
iteliei. is distributed according to
need, not creed.
Neutral consuls and Swiss distribu
tors are supplementing the American
workers.
It requires seven days to travel
from Beirut to Constantinople.
The journey from Aleppo to Tre
bizond overland takes two weeks.
Mount Ararat is as high as Pike's
Peak.
The Russian Caucasus is about the
same latitude as New York City. Win
ter there means suffering.
One hundred cents of every dollar
goes for relief. Administrative ex
penses of the American committee
are met privately.
Within a small area in western Asia
area more than a million men, women
and children have lost their lives
through massacre, deportation, dis
ease, starvation—all during the last
two years.
Atrocities have now ceased, but the
remnant of the people, including hun
dreds of thousands ,cf orphans, is in
danger of starving to death.
Many of these are away from their
homes which have bean destroyed.
They have no means of livelihood.
Their sole dependence is American
charity.
All the aid to be supplied can be ap
plied directly in practically any. part
of the entire section. The Turks them
selves are now encouraging the work
of distribution.
American missionaries and consuls
and representatives of other Christian
governments are engaged in this bene
ficient service. Without remunera
tion, they are tireless and efficient.
Every dollar contributed here is used
for relief there. All expenses are met
without draft upon contributions.
i
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♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦iif
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Wa

MARKETS
****************
The following market quotations
are the prices paid to the producer
by the dealer and are changed daily,
thus giving the public the accurate
quotations in all classes of grain,
produce and meats.
Hay and Grain.
Wheat, Marquis, bulk.$2.07%
Wheat, Bluestem No. 1, bulk,
net, delivered to warehouses 2.0314
Wheat, Bluestem No. 1, sacked
net, delivewed to warehouses 2.12%
Wheat, Fortyfold, No. 1, bulk
net, delivered to warehouses 2.03%
Wheat, Fortyfold, No. 1, s'k'd
net, delivered to warehouses 2.12%
Wheat, White Club, No. 1, bulk
net, delivered to warehouses 2.02%
Wheat, White Club, No. 1, s'k'd
net, delivered to warehouses 2.11%
Wheat, Red Russian, No. 1, blk
net, delivered to warehouses 1.99%
Wheat, Red Russian, No. 1 skd
net, delivered to warehouses 2.08%
No. 1 Feed Oats, sacked, per
cwt, net, delivered to ware
houses .
No. 1 Timothy Hay.
White Beans, per pound.
Produce.
Eggs, per doz .
Butter, creamery, per lb
Butter, ranch, per lb...
Potatoes, per cwt.
Young »hickens. per lb.
.... 3.60
.. .$34.00
.07%
.60c
68c
60c
....70c !
[email protected]
Hogs, live wt., light, per lb,[email protected]
Hogs, live wt., heavy, per lb
Old Roosters, per lb.
Hogs, dressed, heavy, per lb .... 17c
Hogs, dressed, light, per [email protected]
Veal, live wt., per lb
Veal, dressed, per lb.
[email protected]
14c
8c
. . [email protected]
[email protected]
Mutton, per lb
. [email protected]
The commissions Sales Co. is pre
pared to care for all kinds of sales,
large or small. Try us. Satisfaction
guaranteed. Office at the Big Bend
Store, Moscow, Idaho.
70-94
PROFESSIONAL CARDS
PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS
DR. C. L. GRITMAN—Physician and
surgeon, 720 So. Main. Phone 27.
DR. JOHN W. STEVENSON—Eye
Ear, Nose and Throat.
Fitted. Office of Dr. Aspray, 303
3rd Ave. Phone 177.
Glasses
DR. F. M. LEITCH—Physician, Com
mercial Bldg. Phone 223Y.
OSTEOPATH
DR. W. M. HATFIELD—Osteopath,
Creighton Bldg. Phone 48.
CHIROPRACTIC
DR. ZONA BIGGS—Chiropractic. Sleeh
Bldg.. Phone 331H.
DENTISTS
DR. J. A. McDANIELS—Dentist, First
Nnt'l Bank Bldg. Phone 229.
LAWYERS
A. L. MORGAN—Lawyer, Urquhart
Bldg. Phone 75.
A. H. OVERSMITH — Atttorney-at
Law, Urquhart Bldg, Phone 208,
ORLAND & LEE
First Natl. Bank Bldg. Phones Or
land 104. Lee 104L. •
Attorneys-at-Law.
H. R. SMITH—Attorney-at-Law. First
Natl. Bank Bldg., Third St. Entrance.
Phone 43 Y .
JOHN NISBET—Attorney-at-law, 1st
Nat'l Bank Bldg. Phone 131J.
IMPROVEMENT PARLOR
MARIE SHANNON.—Rooms 18 and
Phone 122J.
19 Urquhart Bldg.
Shampooing, massage and manicur
ing.
TAXI CAB
C. L. DREW.—Phone, office 272;
residence, 3.
ARCHITECTS
Skattaboe Blk., phone 200.
FLORISTS
SCOTT BROS — Proprietors, North
Main. Phone 289.
VETERINARY
DR. E. T. BAKER—Assistant State
Veterinarian. Residence Sixth and
Washington, phone 243. _
DR. J. D. ADAMS —Veterinary 220
South Asbury. Phone 15Y.
AUCTIONEER
CHAS. E. WALKS—Auctioneer, Urqu
hart Jjgd. Phone 278.
CREAMERY
MOSCOW CREAMERY -=■ 66 cents
paid for butter fat. Ice créant, bulk
and brick in cold storage.
HIDES AND JUNK
HIGHESTPRICES PAID FOR
hides and junk—Moscow Hide and
Junk Co., 308 W. 6th St. Will call
city or country. Phone 262.
EXPERT PIANO TUNING
Phone I89-W
HARD WOOD FLOORS
Get your hard wood floors sanded
and polished by motor power now.
Half the cost of hand work. Ma
chine will be here for a limited
time only. Harry Stem. Phone
106W. 76-80
On or after January 8, 1919, all
CALL FOR SPECIAL FUND
REQUISITIONS
requisitions drawn on Local Improve
ment District No. 13, may be ex
changed for General Fund Warrants,
presented to the City Clerk. In-1
terest on the above mentioned requi
sitions will cease January 8, 1919.
By order of the City Council.
L. T. HAMMOND,
Citv Treasurer,
87-88
LATAH COUNTY
TITLE & TRUST COMPANY
Abstracts of Title Conveyancing
Mortgage Loans
Per
$ 1,000
ACRE!
GROWING
THE ALTON IMPROVED
Red Raspberry
The greatest money-maker on rec
ord. Get my book, THE FARM
ERS KEY TO SUCCESS, only 60c,
worth $100 to any farmer. Money
back if not satisfied. Pamphlet
free.
H. A. PINEGAR
Wellington, Utah.
Thompson Insurance Agency
Fire Insurance, Automobile and
Plate Glass Insurance, Fidelity and
Casualty Bonds
Moscow, Idaho.
FOR FIRST CLASS SHOE
REPAIRING
OILING AND REPAIRING
HARNESS
go to
J. N. FRIEDMAN
HARNESS SHOP
FINEST LINE OF HIGH GRADE
WOOLENS. YOUR INSPECTION
SOLICITED
O. H. SCHWARZ, Tailor.
Victrolas and
Victor Records
Sherfey's Book Store
Moscow, Idaho
If It's New We Are Sure the
First to Have It
Monuments
THE MOSCOW MARBI.iE
WORKS
George H. Moody, Proprietor
Has the finest line of Monument*
and all Kinds of Marble Work to
be found in the Inland Empire
PRICES REASONABLE
See Our Work Before Ordering
A Bank's
Greatest
Asset
Cannot be expressed in
figures, but lies in its his
tory of service and sound
business principles.
On its enviable record
through many years of
unfailing usefulness this
bank solicits your busi
ness, offering the same
liberal treatment that has
always marked its policy.
FIRST TRUST
& SAVINGS BANK
Capital $100,000

Hotel Moscow
■I*
TOM WRIGHT, Prop.
Thoroofhlj Modern ::
FIRST CLASS GRILL
AUTO BUS AT ALL TRAINS *'
I Through an error on the part of the
I reporter, the name of Mrs. C N. Little
| was omitted from the list of captains
! appointed by Mrs. Warren Truitt in the
4
proposed organization of the local
branch of the Needle Work Guild.
jrrrr ~ . - -
You will find you save more
and live better if you trade at
the
I
THIRD STREET
MARKET
CHICKENS, GEESE, DUCKS
AND HIDES WANTED
L. M. KITLEY
PHONE 248
CLASSIFIED ADS
HELP WANTED—Female
GIRL FOR GENERAL HOUSE
426 East 1st St.; phone
86-89
work.
62W.
WANTED —A COMPETENT GIRL
for general housework. Phone 318L.
Mrs. J. E. Wodsedalek.
86-tf
WOMAN AS COOK
WANTED
for sorority house. Address 624 .Uni
versity Ave., Moscow.
|30tf
FOR RENT—Rooms
*
FOR RENT—FOUR FURNISHED
housekeeping rooms, private bath.
87-99
Phone 262J.
1
FOR RENT — LIGHT HOUSE
keeping rooms, close in. 124 South
Almond. Phone 1SR.
79tl
FOR RENT.—FURNISHED OR UN
furnished housekeeping rooms; pri
vate bath. Call 46.
80-tf
FOR RENT —A ROOM WITH OR
without sleeping porch ; hot and cold
'•ater; modern conveniences; price rea
t nabe. 425 East Third St. Mrs. D.
quhart.
f
(3tf
FOR RENT—FURNISHED APART
ments and furnished rooms at
Eggan's apartments. Phone 205H.
231-tf
FOR RENT — AFTER JAN. 1ST,
two housekeeping rooms, first floor,
modern, 210 First St.
73tf
FOR RENT—Houses
FOR RENT.—AN EIGHT ROOM
modern house, on Deakin Ave., east
of dormitory. Phone 170J.
«
83- tf
FOR RENT. —7 ROOM HOUSE,
bath, toilet, electric lights, cellar,
good repair, tow blocks from Main
street. Barn, chicken park, good lo
cation. Rent, $17 per mo.
Patten.
G. H.
78-102
FOR RENT—FIVE ROOM HOUSE
Corner Main and Morton. Phone
1Y. J. E. Mudgett.
44-tf
WANTED—Miscellaneous
WANTED—GOOD LIVE DEALER
to sell the best truck on the market.
Can make deliveries 1 to 5 tons. Write
Rochester Motor Co., 1012- Sprague
Ave., Spokane. Wash.
235-tf
WANTED TO RENT—AN OFFICE
desk. Telephone 352. _
Livestock wanted
291-tf
GOOD FRESH COW—CALL 296.
87-tf
Idaho Hotel.
FOR SALE—Real Estate
FOR SALE. A MODERN 8-ROOM
Equipped with electric
stove, laundry and other conveniences.
Apply 514 E "C." Phone 141Y 84tf
house.
FOR SALE OR TRADE—205 ACRES
of timber land 8 miles from Moscow;
trade for Moscow property preferred.
Call 201L. Moscow.
58tl
FOR SALE —HOUSE AND LOT,
corner First and Polk Sts. Inquire
Mrs. Wm. Arnett.
244tf
>
FOR SALE—Live Stock
FOR SALE.—A HEREFORD BULL,
coming two years old. Matt Hor
86-92
rigan; phone 121W.
I HAVE A PURE BRED REGISTER
ed Holstein bull, originating from
John L, Srpith's herd, Spokane, for
service and sale at Neely's barn ; serv
ice $2.50 in advance; see Mr. Neely at
the barn. E. J. Armbruster.
59tf
FOR SALE—Miscellaneous
FOR SALE.
one Mitchell car if taken by Jan.
17. Call 601 So. Main or phone 15R.
87-92
WILL SACRIFICE
HEATING STOVES AND HOUSE
hold furniture. Wm. Johnson, 103
84-90
N. Asbnry.
FOR SALE.—200 CORDS WOOD,
fir, tamarac and pine, delivered
anywhere in Moscow. * E. B. Brock
way. Phone 155J.
79-tf.
FOR SALE.—J. I. CASE 28-INCH
Threshing Machine Outfit. Phone
76-101
899X4.
JOLINE - KNIGHT 7-PASSENGER
touring car, in good condition, for sale
r trade. Moscow Auto & Supply Co.
283tl
SELDEN TRUCKS SOLD ON DE
ferred payment plan. Write Rochestei
Motor Co., 1012 Sprague Ave., Spo
kane, Wash.
235-tf • ;
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR LEASE—THREE TO FIVE
years. 620 acres in best wheat
growing section of Alberta, no waste
land; 230 acres ready for first crop.
t Address at once "J" care Star-Mir
ror.
86-tf

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