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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, January 09, 1919, Image 4

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1919-01-09/ed-1/seq-4/

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$ 9.75
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That's the Price For
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A Good Coat
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There's a big round rack crowded full of this sea
son's stylish Coats. No two alike. Values up to—
up to—well, we'd better not say, it would seem
ridiculous. Come and look 'em over. Take your
choice for $9.75, that's all.
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Creighton's
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FAMOUS SPEAKER
ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF AG III -
CULTFRE WILL VISIT MOSCOW
- , IN EEBRUARY
1
That the people of Latah county may
look forward to a great intellectual
treat during the week of February 4-7
is the statement of W. Kjosness, assist
ant" county agent leader for the ten
north Idaho counties. Mr. Kjosness,
who is actively engaged in promoting
the success of Farmers' and House
keepers' week, says that no more at
tractive feature has ever been arrang
ed for than the appearance of A. J.
Christie, assistant secretary of agri
culture. Mr. Christie has been urgent
ly invited to be the chief speaker on
the program, and there is every expect
ation that the people who attend the
sessions of the farmers' week will have
the opportunity of hearing this famous,'
man.'
Mr. Kjosness states that Mr. Christie
is famous throughout the country as a
forceful speaker on agricultural topics.
He has made an enviable reputation
on the Cimutauqua platform, and is a
person of broad thought and plain,
practical common sense ideas.
"I look for a record-breaking attend
ance at the Farmery' and Housekeep
ers' week meetingé," stated Mr. Kjos
"The chief topics under con
ness.
eideration will be' the after-the-war
problems of the people who live on i
the farms. In my opinion the most im
!nr_
Keep on as an Investor ^
after the war
Fc
fir
(c
This institution considers it a duty to the public to help new
investors in continuing the habits of thrift and investment, es
pecially the small investor.
We suggest that you save and invest as large a proportion
of your income in peace as you did in war.
Keep on with your habits of thrift. Start a Savings Account
and make regular additions. We wish to entourage safe investing
of your savings, and will co-operate with you in protecting you
from fraud and untimely action in investments of a risky nature.
Ic
fc
The Moscow State Bank
uienfenfenfe
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hi
Teach the Children How
to Care for Their Teeth
It is an easy matter to impress children with the value of
certain habits '"which have to do with health.
Food lodged- bétwèen the" teeth affords an ideal culture
ground for bacteria or germs. But for this, teeth would never
decay and certain diseases would be avoided.
BORODENT TOOTH PASTE
• (Milk of Magnesia)
gill remove all germs and overcome the conditions which cause
Jieir growth; " If is a safe dentifrice for children's sensitive
teeth. It sweetens the breath and keeps the mouth clean and
healthy.
Provide each, child with its individual tooth brush and tube . .'/
of paste, and encourage it to brush it's teeth after each meal,
also just -after arising in the morning and before retiring at
night.
Price 25 Cents
Corner Drug Store
Where Quality Counts
BOLLES & LINDQUIST, Props.
portant discussion will be that of the
labor problem. The solution of this
will come through an increased ac
quisition of labor saving devices and
through the proper distribution of lab
or.
"I think there will be greater dif
ficulty than ever in securing desir
able labor. Paternalism with regard
to the returned soldier Is, I feel sure,
a very serious mistake. Those boys
will be more independent than ever
and will know exactly what they want
to do and the conditions under which
they mean to work. The war has dem
onstrated that we can get along with
less labor on the farm than formerly
without curtailing the amount produc
ed. I think the next few years will
see the soldiers following the callings
to which they are attracted and for
which they are especially fited, and I
think the farmers will be hiring better
labor and less of It. The whole prob
lem is economic. Machinery will have
to replace men, for the benefit of the
race at large, and there will be more
discrimination in getting and giving
jobs than has been known heretofore."
Mr, Kjosness feels that the people
of the county will certainly derive
great benefit and pleasure from attend
ing ttie farmers' .and housekeepers'
week, and he is desirous that every
one should be thoroughly familiar with
the many interesting and useful dis
cussions that will be given a place on
the program during those four days.
ll gives some idea of the appalling
catastrophe that has overtaken this
people when one considers that out of
population of about 100,000 refu
gees in this province, fully 20,000 are
To these must
fatherless children,
be added also many more in the Baku
Kars and Erzroom regions.
MIINGGH IS DANCING
Bavarian Capital Changed Little
by Long War.
People Paler Than Their Wont, but
Appear to Be Warmly
Dressed.
Munich.—Munich looks much less
changed after four years of war than
those who knew it would have thought
possible. The city appears far livelier
and gayer than thrèe years ago. Part
of this Impression is unquestionably
due to the profusion of Bavarian-Ger
man flags everywhere, emphasized by
the red banners of the socialists.
Although fairly dark in the evening,
because coal must be saved, the streets
are crowded during the early hours.
Restaurants are open and a fairly pal
atable imitation of beer is served.
Many of the larger restaurants and
prominent hotels have paper napkins
and paper tablecloths.
Every postage stamp one licks has
a strange disagreeable taste because
of the use of some substitute. Bicycle
tires have been replaced by coils of
steel.
The streets are as clean as ever and
with stores as beautiful, although filled
with articles the prices of which would
have been unbelievable four years
ago.
The suffering seems to fall heavily
on the poor people. Food now Is more
plentiful because the signing of the
armistice brought out stocks which
have been held in reserve. The people
are perhaps paler than their wont, but
the street crowds appear to be warmly
dressed.
The city has resumed dancing, which
has occasioned a terrific editorial out
burst from a portion of the press. For
mer Imperial Chancellor von Hertllng's
organ, the Bavarian Courier, says:
"Our enemies will be robbed of the
last vestige of pity if they hear of
this. Are they not right?"
WOUNDED IN ACTION
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Seventy-seventh division who was se
verely wounded in action. General
Johnson led a battalion of the Seven
ty-seventh in search of the famous
"Lost battalion" which was surround
ed during the fighting In the Argonne
forest.
General Johnson Is a regular army
man, having enlisted as a private. He
is a veteran of the Spanish-American
war and the Philippine campaigns.
WIFE SLAIN IN CZAR'S ARMS
Former Valet Tells of the Murder of
the Entire Romanoff Family by
the Bolshevik!.
London.—A dispatch to the Ex
change Telegraph from Amsterdam
says the Kiev newspapers publish a
story given by the valet of the former
empress of Russia of the murder of
the entire Romanoff family by the bol
shevik!.
The valet said on July 17 all of the
members of the family were taken to
the cellar of the convent at Ekaterin
burg and placed against the wall and
shot one after the other. According
to the story, the murderers granted the
last request of the former Emperor
Nicholas that his wife, who was 111,
should die In his arms.
According to the valet, the Grand
Duchess Tatiano was only wounded by
the shots of the riflemen and was
killed by blows from their rifle butts.
All the bodies were burned in the out
skirts of Ekaterinburg.
THINKS HE WILL SEE AGAIN
Hero Blinded by High Explosive Shell
Believes His Sight Will
Return.
Philadelphia.—Just one doctor out
of twenty—and himself—believe that
the sight of Lieut. Frank Schoble, Jr.,
can be restored.
"A thousand doctors may tell me I'll
not get my sight again, but I know
that in a few months Tm going to see
again," cried the young fighting man
when told his case was hopeless.
The lieutenant was leading bis men
in a picturesque ravine In the Argonne
forest in France when a high explosive
■bell blinded him.
GENERAL BELL DIES
NEW YORK.—Major General J.
Franklin Bell, commander of the de
partment of the east, died last night at
the Presbyterian hospital in this city.
His death was due to heart disease.
He was taken to the hospital three
days ago for observation, but it was
not realized that his condition was
serious and death came as a complete
surprise. General Bell was 63 years
old.
RELEASE TO SPEED UP
11,000 Men Dill Soon Receive Honor
able Discharge.
CAMP LEWIS, Tacoma.—All paper
work which can be dispensed with will
be omitted and the discharge of ap
proximately 11,000 men of the 13th di
vision, whose release was authorized
in a telegram received yesterday, will
be speeded up, according to officers
who have this work in hand.
HONOR CONFERRED
Mrs. James H. Forney Invited to At
tend Y. W. C. A. Conference
in Seattle.
Owing to the fact that she is ab
sent from the city, Mrs. James H.
Forney will be unable to accept an
honor which has been conferred upon
her by Mrs. J. P. Weyerhauser, chair
man of the Northwestern field and
by Mrs. W. D. Perkins, chairman of
the finance committee of the Y. W.
C. A. A wire arrived this morning
from these officials earnestly desir
ing Mrs. Forney's attendance at the
special field reconstruction confer
ence at Seattle headquarters, on the
fifteenth of this month. The chief
purpose of the meeting is to discuss
with the national secretary from New
York and the field committee, the
enlarged program for the Y. W. C. A.
expansion work.
Mrs. Forney left Moscow some
weeks ago to visit her daughter, Mrs.
Wilfred Harrison, who is ill at her
home in Edmonton. Judge Forney
reports that Mi's. Harrison is show
ing marked improvement the past
fortnight.
Great as is the tragedy of massacre
a greater tragedy was the forced de
portations, 100,000 women and child
ren from one district alone. It is ter
rible to contemplate their fate after
the war. The nations should provide
means for searching out and restor
ing any survivors to their homes and
loved ones.
CORNWALL NEWS
Mr. and Mrs. Clark Benton and
little daughter, of Moscow, were visit
ing relatives here Sunday.
PHYSICALLY FIT
AT ANY AGE
7

It isn't age, it's careless living that
puts men "down and out." Keep your
internal organs in good condition and
you will always be physically fit
The kidneys are the most over
worked organs in the human body.
When they break down under the
strain and the deadly _ uric acid ac
cumulates and crystallizes look out!
These sharp crystals tear and scratch
the delicate urinary channels causing
excruciating pain and set up irrita
tions which may cause premature de
generation and often do turn " into
deadly Bright's Disease.
One of the first warnings of slug
gish kidney action is pain or stiffness
in the small of the back, loss of appe
tite, indigestion or rheumatism. _
Do not wait until the danger is upon
At the first indication of trouble
Get a trial
you.
go after the cause at once,
box of GOLD MEDAL Haarlem Oil
Capsules, imported direct from the
laboratories in Holland. They will give
almost immediate relief. If for any
cause they should not, yonr money
be refunded. But be sure to get GOLD
MEDAL. None other is genuine, la
sealed boxes, three sizes.
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Crescent Baking Powder
Crescent Mfg. Co., Seattle, Wash.
Write 1er Cook Beek
Sold by Grocer*
11
TOMORROW
$10
Cowing Down Each Day
The price is REDUCED ONE DOLLAR and the
Coats for Women and Misses are being sold. Some
60 garments left and from now on the bargains will
be greater than ever.
COATS—THE MATERIAL BY THE YARD
WOULD BE MORE THAN THE FINISHED
GARMENT. Each day they are $1.00 less, but
don't wait too long, others may take your choice.
MANY ALL-WOOL
i
Dresses 1-2 Price
Suits 1-2 Price
DAVIDS
9
anl
Burt and Willie Vandevanter left
Monday for Lewiston, where they
will work in the Lewiston orchards,
They were accompanied by Sam Ho
hart, who went on business.
The telephone company held a
meeting Tuesday afternoon at Mose
Vandevanter's.
Most all the children are attending
school now. No new influenza cases
reported yet.
Mrs. George Davis, Mrs. R. Woods
and Mr». Groneberg were visiting
friends here Tuesday.
Mrs. May Woolfenbarger and baby
are visiting relatives here this week.
Clarence McGarvey, who was called
^
Editor Star-Mirror.
Dear Sir: I appreciate your good
natured slaps, but surely they fall on
the wrong place, so to speak. I do
not, as a layman, set my opinion
against experts. I ventured to set
the opinion of certain well known and
successful experts against others.
When experts disagree, laymen must
think. But be that as it may, I should
not have ventured to antagonize au
t&ority, but for the obvious inconsist
ency of its action and the injustice I
involved in that inconsistency. Even
a layman can discriminate between
justice and injustice. Let justice be
done; let the same privileges be ac-!
curded the churches as are granted
the stores, and despite the skepticism '
of the expert, I will whole-heartedly
co-operate with the authorities, ac
to Moscow by the death of his mother,
Mrs. M. M. McGarvey, experts to re
turn to his home in Canada this week.
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CONTRIBUTION BOX
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tively, as well as passively. I prefer
the quiet paths of docility.
Some of my friends tejl me it is
imnolitic to sneak out and that the
^npfflpnlpriTbnlbnlbntntint
pfflpntinl
churches were penalized because I
have spoken as I have. Impolitic, it
may be—truth generally is—but I
have sufficient respect for those with
whom I disagree not to attribute to
them_ any such motives. We are all
working for the good health of the
, community and granted a fair and
! insistent policy it is not difficult to
uni ~® the people of Moscow. Without
| snc h unity no amount of force and
! no multiplication 0 f regulations and
ordinances can make a policy effec
five.
.
A Few .Suggestions for the Repre
sentatives of the People to Prevent
the Fire of Discontent.
(By a Laboring Man.)
1. Maintain the present wage scale
by stopping the mines and industries
from cutting the wages as they are
doing .now in Idaho,
Keen the mines and manufac
tories running and not let them shut
down for the purpose of a reduction
in wages.
3. Appoint a commission to in
vesHgate the exhorfaitant prices of
commodities and find the cause, let
the people know and don't pigeon
hole it.
4. Appropriate a hundred million
dollars for the boys coming home
first to give them assistance until
spring, instead of drugging the mar
ket with surplus labor, as some in
dustries would like to see it.
5. Government regulations of all
rai1-oads and industries and not own
ership, as the government would not
be able to buy their watered stock,
6. Stop all enemy aliens from
working in our industries and turn
their jobs to the boys coming home,
W. H. BRIDGE.
m
2 .
f' ^ey made it possible for them to
exist.
HARRY p. STERN,
1019 S. Harrison. Moscow.

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