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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, January 11, 1919, Image 2

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The DAILY STAR-MIRROR
Published every evening except Sun
day, at Moscow, Idaho.
GEO. N, LAMPHERE, Publisher.
The Official Newspaper of the City
Moscow.
Entered a« second-class matter Oct.
S6, 1911, at the postoffice of Moscow,
Idaho, under the Act of Congress
March, 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
verd by carrier to any part of city;
Month ...,50c
$1.60
DeK
Ver
Three Months
She Months .
Sue Year ...
2.76
6.00
By Mail
foutilde of city and on rural routes):
Wpr Month .^40c
$1.16
e
ree Months
Months .
joe Year ...
2.26
4.00
The (Weekly) Idaho Pont:
fror Year
$1.60
MEMBER OP ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively
Untitled to the use for republication
ml aH news-dispatches credited to it
•r not otherwise credited in this pi
and also the local news pubfii
therein.
All sights of republication of
■fecial dispatches herein are also re
ndered.
►er
CARBLBSSNESS AND INFLUENZA
The authorities have put the in
fluenza situation squarely up to the
people of Moscow; and whether this
city remains open or again has to
undergo the very expensive and an
noying experience of being closed
down will rest entirely with our citi
zens. The intelligence with which the
privileges due to the lifting of the
quarantine are enjoyed, will deter
mine whether there will be an out
break of new cases or whether the
number will be kept down to so few
that the general public need not be
penalized on account of them.
How shall this care be exercised,
and from what practices shall the
people refrain ?
required by the application of a few
principles of common sense ought not
to be too severe a burden for any one.
First and foremost, the mingling of
people in even fairly large groups
should be minimized. Pleasant as it
is to renew social relations with our
friends, all gatherings of an unneces
sary nature should be cut down to a
very few. And in this connection, it
may be mentioned that it is nothing
short of a crime for a person who
feels even slightly indisposed to ac
cept an invitation and thrust his com
pany upon persons who may suffer
serious consequences from the associ
ation. There could be nothing more,
selfish than for persons with head
ache and other symptoms of influenza
to refuse to exercise the small amount
The self-restraint
of self-denial which will keep 'them
at home with their own symptoms.
In the second place it is the duty
of every citizen to see that his system
is in good condition, that he lives upon
a diet calculated to build up resistance
to germs; and that he does not over
work, or overplay. Fatigue and the
consequent reduction in vitality have
had a very dangerous part in the
fatalities recorded in this epidemic.
Preserving with scrupulous care both
internal and external cleanliness,
sleeping in well ventilated rooms or
on porches, and taking daily adequate
exercise in the open air are some of
the practices which have become a
duty to ourselves and our neighbors,
fest M
THE MYSTERY "Q" SHIP.
Not the least thrilling stories of the
great war are those concerning the
mysterious "Q" ships, on which the
men lay for hours, constantly shelled
and killed, and entirely untended un
til the opportunity came to sink the
enemy. A "Q" ship Is described as a
gray, dingy, nondescript kind of ship,
perhaps a collier or a coastal tramp,
But at a signal her hatchways can dis
close glistening 4-Inch guns, and her
harmless looking stays can rap out
wireless messages. It is the true
tales of the "Q" ship's glorious fights
against submarines that make one so
impatient with fiction dealing with
the war. The facts to date are in
finitely more stirring than any writer I
has been able to Imagine them. I
Y
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Will be raised Monday. When you think of Bread
go to the
:
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:
V
t
Empire Bakery
I
:
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:
:
:
CHAS. SCHROEDER, Prop.
:
:
:
Third Street
Phone 250
X
♦♦♦
+
How Stevenson would have gloried
in the crisp explanations and stories
of the men that served on these boats.
Gunner Cunningham, wearing a dis
tinguished service medal, is showing
visitors one of the most famous of the
"Q'' boats in London. He points to a
hawser reel lying on the deck.
"That's a dummy," he says,
the skipper's lookout when a subma
rine is sighted. This little smokestack
is also a dummy—it hides a periscope.
The skipper from his look-out would
give the range to the hidden gun crews.
"No sign of life was to be seen on
the ship after a 'panic party' had put
off in an open boat until the order
Then this forehatch
of
of
"It's
came—'Fire."
flew open and the sides of that dummy
cabin fell outward, and the two 4-inch
guns got to work. We settled one
U boat with twelve hits out of four
teen from one gun and seven out of
eight from the other."
The crew of this decoy ship hunted
submarines in an old steamer called
the Stock Force until the forepart of
that vessel was blown away by a tor
pedo.
» fee ta
"WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE?"
A good many of the agencies that
are now devoting all their energies to
determining what shall be done with
the soldier when he returns and how
he shall be employed might save them
selves a good deal of trouble if they
would only realize that when the Am
erican fighter comes back, he will de
cide those questions for himself and
will not ask,—or accept—any one's
assistance. Canada has been getting
hack her discharged soldiers for a
good many months now, and her ex
perience in dealing with them ought
to be illuminating to the American so
cieties organized to cope with the
problem.
Canada found that after a returned
soldier had been employed in a good
job for a few days, or weeks, he lost
interest in it and wanted to move on.
Restlessness personified is the soldier
who returns from the front. The at
tempt to put a young man used to ac
tion and sudden shifts of fortune on
logged-off lands in lonely regions
would be laughable if it were not so
pathetically mistaken.
During a year or more of constant
change of scene,—from cantonment
to transport, to training camp abroad,
to the "hardening" trenches, to bat
tle, to rest billets, and back Into the
fight again,—the American soldier
has, without question, developed in an
exertme degree the "Where do we go
from here?" habit.
Returning to home soil in the pro
cess of demobilization, he begins his
history of desire for variety by chaf
ing at his detention in a debarkation
camp. And from then on he has con
tinued to display impatience with mo
to
a ] jjf e home,
notony and humdrum routine of typic
The boys will want good jobs—and
they should have them—and they will
want their jobs in places that show a
little get-up-and-get, with respect to
entertainment and abundant variety in
occupation.
A good many pairs of young eyes
must have gazed forlornly out this
morning upon the rain which was
wrecking the coasting on the hills of
Moscow. During the past few weeks
the youth of the city have spent a
good part of every twenty-four hours
on Van Buren and First streets, and
the sound of laughing and shouting
and calls for "track" have broken un
til late at night the silence of streets
which are all too seldom enlivened by
the noise of healthy young people en
joying out-door sports. His must have
been a sour heart, indeed, that did
not rejoice in those speeding flexible
flyers and the plainer home-made
craft on which many a gallant little
fellow made a pecüous descent to
Main street,
ed in the pages of the historian Livy
a precedent for the surrender of
the German fleet. That ancient
chronicler tells how, as an ar
tide of the peace agreement which
The Bishop of Durham has discover
fe* n *>
ended the second Punic war, Carth
age had to surrender to Rome the
whole of her battle fleet. The good
bishop does not intimate that the an
tiquity and respectability ot the prec
edent will make the relinquishment
of his vessels any more agreeable to
the commander of the German navy.
The big farm Is constantly said to
have disappeared, and the general
public is taught to believe that the
ranches of the old romantic days, that
were nearly as big as a New England
state have all been divided up into
tracts of 160 acres or less. There is
still, it seems, one fair-sized farm of
200,000 acres In opration. It is so big
that it sprawls over both Montana and
Wyoming.
fcä
"That editorial about the returning
soldiers getting no sort of welcome
in Moscow hit my son just right," said
a mother to The Star-Mirror. "My
boy said, 'Mother, they seem to think
lots of us when we go away, but they
don't care a hang for us when we
come back, and I'm going to get out
of here.' "
The lad had been in the navy for
many months.
Almost Free From Flu.
Kendrick now has but very few
cases of flu, as nearly all of those
who were taken ill about two weeks
ago have recovered. The prospects
now look very encouraging in the
town itself. It seems that the ridges
tributary to Kendrick are experienc
ing rather a severe epidemic this
week. American ridge has over thirty
cases, Fix ridge about the same num
ber and Texas ridge and Cedar Creek
ridge also have a considerable num
ber, with a few on Potlatch ridge.
It is to be hoped that the end of the
week will see improved conditions in
the community.—Kendrick Gazette.
College Building Dedicated.
TOKIO. —A new college building,
one of the finest educational build
ings in Japan recently was dedicated
at the Aoyamo Gakuin, the well
known American Methodist Episcopal
institution of Tokio. The building was
presented by Guijiro Katsuta of Kobe,
a member of the House of Peers.
The ceremonies were held in the
presence of a distinguished gathering
of Japanese and many American mis-
sionaries were present. Congratula-
tions were offered by T. Nakahashi,
the minister of education, and other
leading Japanese. Mr. Katsuta was
student of the college.
-RS
Hotel Moscow Arrivals.
Jan. 10.—L. H. Pinkham, C. C.
Johnson, Bruce Ellis, Fred I. Fornia,
L. E. Morse, N. A. Roberts, Chas.
Harriman,
Kendrick;
C. Brill, Lewiston; Tobias Myers,
Missoula; Abe Kreidel, San Fran
cisco; A. G. Berg, Seattle; Pearl Bax
ter, June Cole, Potlatch; J. D. Lewis,
Palouse.
Spokane; John Woody,
John Cone, Princeton;
B.
wa
Although he has been suffering
constantly for the past few weeks
from a severe attack of neuritis in
his left arm, Judge Adrian Nelson
has not deserted his post, but is daily
be found at work in his office.
Latah
County
Jan. 10.— W. D. Minnie Stanfield
to Claude A. James, $10; NW1-4 26
43-6.
C. M.— E. W. Shingler to Kendrick
Store Co., $200, due 6-2-19; 2 horses,
harness, etc.
Rel.—Elizabeth F. Childs to same,
r-m 10-21-15.
Power of Atty.—National Surety
Co. to C. H. Patten and A. H. Over
smith.
Order Confirming Sale of Real Es
tate.—Estate of Theodore Tobiasen
T. A. Myklebust, $2,000; lot 39, Mc
Gregor's 2nd, Moscow.
_RS_
+ + + + + + + + + + + + + + ♦ +
PUBLIC STATEMENT
+
♦ Editor Star-Mirror:
♦ Referring to my proclamation ♦
+ in this issue of your paper, which ♦
♦ modifies the orders, rules and +
♦ regulations promulgated in my <■
+ other proclamation published in ♦
+ the Daily Star-Mirror, January +
+ 8th, 1919, I wish to state that *
♦ owing to the difficulty of pre- ♦
♦ scribing in detail the necessary ♦
+ restrictions that are still deem- ♦
♦ ed advisable to control and pre- +
+ vent the spread of influenza in +
+ the city, I have by the terms of ♦
+ said proclamation delegated full ♦
♦ authority and power to Dr. *
+ Adair, city health officer, to ♦
+ make all rules which he may ♦
♦ deem necessary to control and ♦
+ prevent the spread of said di- *•*
+ sease. And I hope with the as- ♦
+ sistance of all our citizens we ♦
may soon free our city from the +
dangerous scourge. In this con- ♦
nection I wish to say to all of ♦
our citizens whose privileges ♦.
have been interfered with, whose +
business has been injured, and ♦
in fact to all who have been in- ♦
convenienced in any way by the ♦
quarantine, that I wish to extend ♦
my thanks to them for the pa- +
tience they have generally shown ♦
under the quarantine restrictions +
and for the promptness with ♦
which they have complied with +
such restrictions, I wish to es- ♦
pecially thank the physicians pf ♦
the city for their valuable aid so ♦
freely given to the city authori- ♦
ties in preventing the spread of ♦
this disease; and I also thank
university authorities, and the ♦
school board of this city for their +
generous assistance and efficient ♦
help in this matter. And to ♦
those who have opposed the city ♦
authorities in enforcing quaran- +
tine order and regulations, I +
trust that they will forget ♦
the troubles and deprivations ♦
caused thereby, that they may ♦
soon get back to their normal ♦
feelings and be happy in the joy ♦
of that peace of soul that "pass- ♦
eth understanding." ♦
WARREN TRUITT. Mayor. ♦
+ ♦ + + + + + +'+ + + ♦ + + ♦
*
the ♦
OFFERED FOR SALE
SALES AGENT ANGELL WILL
OPEN SEALED BIDS JANUARY
TWENTY-FIRST
All of the equipment used In con
nection with the S. A. T. C. is to be
sold by the university to the highest
bidder. Sealed bids are called for.
Bids will be opened at the university
by the committee under M. F. Angell
on Tuesday, January 21. Dean
Angell is acting as sales agent, and
he is being assisted by R. D. Wil
Hams, who served as steward for the
S. A. T. C. sections.
The equipment, which will be
found accurately described in the ad
vertising columns of the Star-Mirror
on next Monday and in succeeding
issues, includes articles far too num
erous to mention in this account.
I Among the principal articles which
will probably attract bidders are
automobiles, cook stoves, hot-water
tanks, kettles, dishes, and all equip
ment üsed in connection with feed
ing the army students.
Everything Included In the plumb
ing outfit will be on the list. There
are also four hot-air furnaces.
'Even the buildings will be disposed
of in this manner. There is one
double building 20x180 feet, connected
in the center with a kitchen 30x30.
The entire- building is double floored.
The roof is covered with two-ply
The commissions Sales Co. is pre
pared to care for all kinds of sales,
large or small. Try us. Satisfaction
guaranteed. Office at the Big Bend
Store, Moscow, Idaho.
70-94
Read The Daily Star-Mir
ror Want Ads.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS
PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS
DR. C. L. GRITMAN—Physician and
surgeon. 720 So. Main. Phone 27,
DR. JOHN W. STEVENSON—Eye
Ear, Nose and Throat. Glasses
Fitted. Office of Dr. Aspray, 303
3rd Ave. Phone 177._
DR. F. M. LEITCH—Physician, Com
mercial Bldg. Phone 223Y.
DR. W. A. ADAIR — Physician,
Creighton, Blk. Phone 85.
OSTEOPATH
DR. W. M. HATFIELD—Osteopath,
Creighton Bldg. Phone 48.
CHIROPRACTIC
DR. ZONA BIGGS—Chiropractic. Steele
Bldg. Phone 331H.
DENTISTS
DR. J A. McDANlELS—Dentist, First
Nat'l Bank Bldg. Phone 229.
DR. H. J. SMITH—Dentist, Urqu
hart Bldg. Phone 9.
LAWYERS
A. L. MORGAN—Lawyer, Urqubart
Bldg. Phone 75.
A. H. OVERSMITH —Atttorney-at
Law, Urqubart Bldg. Phone 208.
ORLAND & LEE — Attorneys-at-Law,
First Natl. Bank Bldg. Phones Or
land 104. Lee 104L.
H. R. SMITH—Attorney-at-Law, First
Natl. Bank Bldg., Third St. Entrance.
Phone 43Y.
JOHN NISBET—Attorney-at-law, 1st
Nat'l Bank Bldg. Phone 131J.
IMPROVEMENT PARLOR

MARIE SHANNON.—Rooms 18 and
Phone 122J.
19 Urqubart Bldg.
Shampooing, massage and manicur
ing.
TAXI CAB
C. L. DREW.—Phone, office 272;
residence, 3.
ARCHITECTS
C. RICHARDSON, ARCHITECT—
Skattaboe Blk., phone 200.
FLORISTS
SQTTT BROS — Proprietors, North
Main. Phone 289.
VETERINARY
DR. E. T. BAKER—Assistant State
Veterinarian. Residence Sixth and
Washington, phone 243.
DR. J. D. ADAMS — Veterinary, 220
South Asbury. Phone 15Y.
AUCTIONEER
CHAS. E. WALKS—Auctioneer, Urqu
hart Blgd. Phone 278.
CREAMERY
MOSCOW CREAMERY —66 cents
paid for butter fat. Ice cream, bulk
and brick in cold storage.
HIDES AND JUNK
HIGHESTPRICES PAID FOR
hides and junk—Moscow Hide and
Junk Co., 308 W. 6th St. Will call
city or country. Phone 262.
EXPERT PIANO TUNING
Phone I89-W
HARD WOOD FLOORS
Get your hard wood floors sanded
and polished by motor power now.
Half the cost of hand work. Ma
chine will be here for a limited
time only. , Harry Stern. Phone
105W. 76-80
certainteed roofing.
When the affairs pertaining to the
S .A. T. C. are all wound up, Mr.
Williams, who has been a most effi
cient steward, will return to his home
in Boise. He was under contract with
the university for eight montns, but
the abrupt demobilization of the stu
dent army has eliminated the neces
sity for his services.
LATAH COUNTY
TITLE * TRUST COMPANY
|
1
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j
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1
:
1
i
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Abstracts *f Title Conveyaneing
Mortgage Leona
Per
$ 1,000
ACRE!
GROWING
THE ALTON IMPROVED
Red Raspberry
The greatest money-maker on rec
ord. Get my book, THE FARM
ERS KEY TO SUCCESS, only 60c,
worth $100 to any (fermer. Money
back if not satisfied. Pamphlet
free.
H. A. PINEGAR
Wellington, Utah.
Thompson Insurance Agency
Fire Insurance, Automobile and
Plate Glass Insurance, Fidelity and
Casualty Bonds
J. G. V ennigerholz, Prop.
Moscow, Idaho.
FOR FIRST CLASS SHOE
REPAIRING
OILING AND REPAIRING
HARNESS
go to
J. N. FRIEDMAN
HARNESS SHOP
FINEST LINE OF HIGH GRADE
WOOLENS. YOUR INSPECTION
SOLICITED
O. H. SCHWARZ, Tailor.
Victrolas and
Victor Records
Sherfey's Book Store
Moscow, Idaho
If It's New We Are Sore the
First to Have It
Monuments
THE MOSCOW MARBI.£
WORKS
George H. Moody, Proprietor
Has the finest line of Monuments
and all Kinds of Marble Work to
be found in the Inland Empire
PRICES REASONABLE
See Our Work Before Ordering
w
i
*
Hotel Moscow
+
*
+
TOM WRIGHT, Prop.
+
*
+
Thoroughly Modern
A
*
FIRST CLASS GRILL •
t AUTO BUS AT ALL TRAINS <
T
*
A Bank's
Greatest
Asset
Cannot be expressed in
figures, but lies in its his
tory of service and sound
business principles.
On its enviable record !
through many years of [
unfailing usefulness this |
bank solicits your busi
ness, offering the same
liberal treatment that has
always marked its policy.
«
FIRST TRUST
& SAVINGS BANK
- Capital $100,000 '
■ 1
Cecil Eyan returned yesterday from
|Camp Grant, Ill., being honorably dis
Cecil has
charged from the service.
I been four months in the service and
! was attending a non-commissioned of
ficers' school
CLASSIFIED ADS
HELP WANTED—Female
GIRL FOR GENERAL HOUSE
426 East 1st St.; phone
86-89
work.
62W.
A COMPETENT GIRL
WANTED
for general housework. Phone 318L.
Mrs. J. E. Wodsedalek.
86-tf
WANTED — WOMAN AS COOK
for sorority house. Address 624 Uni
versity Ave., Moscow..
80tf
FOB RENT—Boom«
FOR RENT—FOUR FURNISHED
housekeeping rooms, private bath.
87-9»
Phone 262J.
FOR RENT — LIGHT HOUSE
keeping rooms, close in. 124 South
Almond. Phone 15R.
79 tf
FOR RENT.—FURNISHED OR UN
furnished housekeeping rooms; pri
vate bath. Call 46.
80-tf
FOR RENT —A ROOM WITH OR
without sleeping porch ; hot and cold \
'■ater ; modern conveniences ; price rea
i nabe. 425 East Third St. Mrs. IX
• quhart.
13tf
FOR RENT—FURNISHED APART
ments and furnished rooms at
Eggan's apartments. Phone 206H.
23i-tf
AFTER JAN. 1ST,
two housekeeping rooms, first floor,
modern, 210 First St.
FOR RENT
73tf
FOR RENT—Houses
FOR RENT.—AN EIGHT ROOM
modern house, on Deakin Ave., east
of dormitory. Phone 170J.
83-tf
FOR RENT. —7 ROOM HOUSE,
bath, toilet, electric lights, cellar,
good repair, tow blocks from Main
street. Barn, chicken park, good lo
cation. Rent, $17 per mo.
Patten.
C. H.
78-102
FOR RENT—FIVE ROOM HOUSE
Corner Main and Morton. Phone
44-tf
1Y. J. E. Mudgett.
W ANTED—Miscellaneous
WANTED—GOOD LIVE DEALER
to sell the best truck on the market
Can make deliveries 1 to 5 tons. Writ«
Rochester Motor Co., 1012 Sprague
Ave.. Spokane, Wash.
235-tl
WANTED TO RENT—AN OFFICE
desk. Telephone 352. _
LIVESTOCK WANTED
291-tf
WANTED TO BUY A GOOD FRESH
milch cow. Phone 921X5.
89-90
GOOD FRESH COW—CALL 295.
87-tf
Idaho Hotel.
FOR SALE—Real Estate
II ROOM HOUSE, 60-FOOT LOT.
So. Asbury; Price $2,500. Phone
39H. Mrs. M. E. Lawrence, Moscow.
_ 88-115
FOR SALE. A MODERN 8-ROOM
Equipped with electric
stove, laundry and other conveniences.
Apply 514 E "C." Phone 141Y 84tf
house.
FOR SALE OR TRADE—205 ACRES
of timber land 8 miles from Moscow ;
trade for Moscow property preferred.
58tf
Call 201L, Moscow.
FOR SALE —HOUSE AND LOT,
corner First and Polk Sts. Inquire
244tf
Mrs. Wm. Arnett.
FOR SALE—Live Stock
FOR SALE.—A HEREFORD BULL
coming two years old. Matt Hor
rigan; phone 121W._86-92
I HAVE A PURE BRED REGISTER
ed Holstein bull, originating from
John L. Smith's herd, Spokane, for
service ancT sale at Neely's barn ; serv
ice $2.50 in advance; see Mr. Neely at
the barn. E. J, Armbrusten.
S9tf
FOR SALE—Miscellaneous
FOR SALE.—WHEAT STRAW IN
the barn. Phone 934X1
88-93
FOR SALE. — WILL SACRIFICE
one Mitchell car if taken by Jan.
17. Call 601 So. Main or phone 15R.
_ 87-92
HEATING STOVES AND HOUSE
hold furniture. Wm. Johnson, 103
84-90
N. Asbury.
FOR SALE.—200 CORDS WOOD,
fir, tamarac and pine, delivered
anywhere in Moscow. E. B. Brock
way. Phone 155J.
79-tf.
FOR SALE.—J. I. CASE 28-INCH
Threshing Machine Outfit. Phone
899X4.
76-101
JOLINE - KNIGHT 7-PASSENGER
touring car, in good condition, for sale
r trade. Moscow Auto & Supply Co.
283tl
SELDEN TRUCKS SOLD ON DE- .
ferred payment plan. Write Rochester
Motor Co., 1012 Sprague Ave., Spo
235-tf
kane. Wash.
FOR TRADE
FOR TRADE—160 ACRES OF GOOD
farm land 100 miles east of Sas
katoon, Sask, Canada, on main line
of G. N. R. R.
proved 10-acre tract close to Mos
W. A. Duncan, care Golden
68-tf
t
Will trade for im
cow.
Rule Store.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR LEASE—THREE TO FIVE
620 acres in best wheat
growing section of Alberta, no waste
land; 230 acres ready for first crop.
Address at once "J" care Star-Mir
86-tf
years.
ror.

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