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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, January 20, 1919, Image 4

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1919-01-20/ed-1/seq-4/

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Swift & Company's
191$ Earnings
How They Affected You
During the twelve months
ended Nov. 2, 1918 (its fiscal
year), Swift & Company trans
acted the largest volume of busi
ness on the smallest margin of
profit in its history.
Profits of the meat business—under
regulations of the United States Food
Administration — were limited to a
maximum of 9 per cent on capital
employed but not to exceed 2H cents
per dollar of sales.
Swift & Company in the regulated
departments earned 7.57 per cent on
capital employed and 2-04 cents per
dollar of sales, out of which had to be
paid interest on borrowed money and
taxes. Here is how these earnings
affect you.
Live-Stock Raiser—
Swift & Company killed 14,948,000
head of livestock, which weighed
alive, 4,971,500,000 pounds.
Swift & Company made a profit of
Only a fraction of a cent per pound
liveweight.
I
III
Consumer—
The sales of cur meat departments
were 4,012,579,000 pounds on which
cur earnings were less than Yi cent
per pound.
The per capita consumption of meat
in the United States is given as 170
pounds. If a consumer purchased only
Swift & Company's products he would
contribute only about 78 cents a year,
or lA cents a week as profit to the
company.
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Swift & Company, U.S. A.
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TAKES OWN LIFE
ARCH CRIMINAL
(Continued from page One.)
which would have taken the remainder
ef his natural life to serve. He was
out on $25,000 cash bönds pending
appeals of these cases in the higher
courts, and it was to save this bond
money to his relatives and yet re
tain his freedom, that he made the
sensational attempt to obliterate hi™
self by staging a drowning in the
Pend d'Oreille river about ten days
NOVEL EXPERIENCE
night,
ago.
YOUNG NURSE HAS
Sunday
through the nonarrival of an expected
SANDPOINT.
- taw
The Man Who Buys Cheap Goods To
Save Money, Is Like The Man Who
Stops The Clock To Save Time
There is no consistency in the act of a person who attempts
to save money in the purchase of drugs or the compounding of
a prescription.
In some lines of business price may well be featured as a
talking point, but in the drug business,' quality, regardless of
price, should be the main consideration.
We handle pure, potent drugs and guarantee the quality of
everything sold, and the prices which we charge are as low as
those asked elsewhere for a smilar quality of goods.
The same high standard which we place on drugs also applies
to our drug sunnries ann various sine lines.
If you are a careful buyer we solicit your business.
U 'U
The Corner Drug Store
Where Quality Counts
BOLLES & LINDQUIST, Proprietors
extra helper, the Red Cross hospital
was left in charge of one nurse, and
she a mere girl. Before morning this
heroic young helper was called on
to minister at a death and a birth be
sides giving regular care to 10 or 12
influenza cases.
Mrs. Davis, head nurse at the Red
Cross hospital, has broken down
under cie strain of caring for influ
en?a patients is now herself a patient
in the City hospital. Mrs. Daviis' con
(jition Is not considered at all serious,
anc j glle j ias not contracted the In
fluenza; hut the doctor thought it
imperative that she should be re
moved from the atmosphere of the
disease. On Monday a call to Spo
jkane for help brought the answer
that not a nurse could be spared from
that city.
THE PEARL HIVER
LIVES CARE FREE LIFE, SPEND
HIS MONEY AS FAST AS HE
MAKES IT
PAPEETE, Island of Tahiti.—Cor
respondence of the Associated Press.)
—The Paumotu Islands—sometimes
called "gold mine" of the eastern Pa
cific—present a wierd and pictur
esque scene during the season for
pearl fishing. From August on, come
the natives from the surrounding is
lands to dive for pearls in the calm
waters of the lagoon thrown open for
the purpose. Within the narrow strip
of sand which surrounds the fishing
ground are huddled three thousand
or more, in a mushroom city, shelter
ed beneath corrugated iron or thatch
ed roof huts. It is a motley company.
There is the Paumotu diver, a
bronzed sea-god—who, with his an
cestors, have been for ages, masters
of the deep and conquerors of the
shark in his own native element. He
is the center of solicitude for the
buyer and trader. He is the indis
pensible object of the moving picture
man who has hastily built his theatre
of corrugated iron where he dispenses
amusement at metropolitan prices. It
is the diver who will spend his earn
ings riding in the wheezy motor car
which the owner operates along a
half mile of hard beach. It is his
earnings which attract a host of
others.
In his habits of spending gis earn
ings the Paumotu diver is much like
the American prospector and miner
of the days of gold strikes and boom
mining camps. In the days of his
prosperity nothing is too good for
him. He buys the choicest of foods
and tinned goods. He is proud of the
appearance of his women folk and
lavishes on them silks, satins, laces,
Chinese shawls, high heeled shoes,
picture hats and corsets, the last a
recent discovery. All of these things
the trader thoughtfully has provided.
Sunday is an Easter parade and a
performance at the picture theatre
like an evening at the opera. In no
"golden horse-shoe" in the world are
more observant or critical eyes, and
betide the Paumotu belle who
woe
fancies she can attend two of these
functions clad in the same costume
without being subject to scornful
comment.
A good diver during the season will
bring up several tons of shells which
recompense him well. The diver takes
no thought for the morrow. He and
his wife bask in affluence and en
joyment. He spends as fast as he
When December comes and
earns.
the fishing season is over they re
turn to their little atoll and the sim
ple life with nothing remaining for
his months of toil but some soiled
finery, the memory of a good time
and the anticipation of a repetition
of their pleasure the next year.
Council To Have Broad Powers.
BOISE.—Permanent control of de
fense for the state with broad powers
will result from the passage of a
measure introduced at the morning
session of the lower house,
appropriates $50,000 for use of the
council and outlines its duties and
powers. The governor has the appoint
ing power and it would consist of not
less than 50 members. The secretary
would be a permanent officer.
The bill
TO GIVE SOLDIERS
IKE PREFERENCE
SPOKANE PLANNING TO SECURE
EMPLOYMENT FOR MEN WHO
FOUGHT IN THE WAR
SPOKANE.—Plans for he occupa
tion of returning soldiers are taking
definite form in the case of several
local organizations, and others are
expected to take like measures in the
near future, as soon as the problem
becomes urgent.
So far the city, the local chamber
of commerce and' the Spokane Master
Builders association have taken con
crete steps, and the local employment
bureau of the federal immigration
service is lending its cooperation.
Improvements, mainly in the form
of road construction, to a total of
$7600 has been announced by the city
park board, which has stated that re
turned soldiers will be given prefer
ence in hiring workmen. Expeditures
have been kept to a minimum for
more than a year, only necessary
maintenance work having been order
ed by the park board. Accumulated
funds now will be used to furnish em
ployment to former wearers of at na
tion's uniform.
At a recent meeting of the master
builders' association here, the mem
bers voted to give work first to re
turning soldiers, and established an
employment bureau for the purpose in
the office of the organization. If suf
ficient jobs are not forthcoming, it
announced, efforts will be made
was
to obtain outside employment.
The Spokane Chamber of Commerce
has established an employment agent
at its offices, with J. L. Conway, him-
self a returned soldier, donating his
services as employment agent to es-
tablish communcation between sol-
diers seeking work and employer with
jobs for them. A number of positions
already have been listed.
-rrs
CLINTON NEWS ITEMS
Miss Esther and Ida Ronholt left
for their home in Mt. Vernon, Wash.,
after an extended visit with their
sisters, Mrs. Clinton Havens and Mrs.
Sherman Towne.
Miss Ruby Heliand is confined to
her home with a bad cold.
The little son of Mr. and Mrs. Clin
ton Havens has been seriously ill but
it now improving.
It has been decided to open the
Hunt school on Monday, Jan. 20th.
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Arrived by Express this Morning
N USUAL, indeed, in many ways, is this offering of beautiful
new Blouses, unusual as to the styles—styles that are de
cidedly new and that were designed especially for us and
other good stores in other cities who are cooperating with us in
this unique Blouse service. Further than this, they are unusual as
to the quality of the fabrics and decidedly unusual as to the values.
Georgette Crêpe and Crepe de Chine are the materials out of which
they are fashioned. Every model is cut on full generous lines so
as to insure perfect fitting.
This sale is a real value-giving event that emphasizes
the superiority of the Blouses to be found here. It is
worthy of note that these models are all refreshing new
and that there's a pleasing diversity of styles as well as a
complete range of sizes to choose from.
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$3.75 and $5.00
This is the last shipment of these silk Blouses due
tract placed early last Summer, when the price of fabrics was much
under present prices, tl is entirely unlikely that values such as
these can be duplicated for a long time to come, an excellent reason
The quantity is
us on a con
for proving now for your future requirements,
limited.
DAVIDS'
CALLS SURRENDER
HORRIBLE SIGHT
ADMIRAL BEATTY THUS DE
SCRIBES COWARDLY ACTION
OF GERMAN FLEET
Admiral Sir David Beattly, in his
speech on board the Lion after the
prest his contemptuous pity for the
foe. As reported* by the London
Chronicle, he said:
"It was a pitiable sight—in fact it
was a horrible sight—to see those
great ships following a British light
cruiser and being shepherded like a
flock of sheep by the Grand Fleet.
We expected them to have the cour
age that we look for from those whose
work lies upon great waters; we ex
pected them to do something for the
honor of their country; and I am sure
that the sides of this gallant old ship,
which have been well hammered In
the past, must have ached, as I ached
and as you ached, to give them an
other taste of what we had intended
for them. But I will say this, that
their humiliating end was a sure end
and a proper end to an enemy who
has proved himself so lacking in
chivalry. At sea his strategy, his
tactics, and his behavior have been
beneath contempt; èiis end is beneath
contempt, and worthy of a nation
which has waged- war in the manner
in which the enemy has waged war."
As the London Socialist Justice re
marks:
"If the German rulers had behaved
with the very least sense of honor or
chivalry, we should haVe felt sad at
such national humiliation even when .
undergone by our bitterest enemy. As
it is, we can feel nothing of the kind."
IDAHO HAS BEEN
DRY THREE YEARS
DESPITE VIGILENCE AND SE
VERE PENALTIES BOOT-LEG
GING HAS BEEN DONE
BOISE.—On January 1, 1919, Idaho
had been bone-dry for three years.
The Idaho prohibition law is one of
MOSCOW PROPERTY TO TRADE
for Clarkston or Lewiston improved
acreage.
Canadian land to trade clear for
acreage near Moscow.
10 acres improved with buildings,
close in, for small neat home in Mos
cow.
Nine room house near paved street,
here, for smaller place.
Moscow residence, good condition,
to exchange for Spokane dwelling.
160 acre ranch. 130 acres culti
vated, 4 room house, well; all fenced.
Located in beautiful valley, south of
American Falls, Idaho. Will sacri
fice in price and take any good prop
erty here. Call at once.
96-97
Metropolitan Investment Co.
Moscow-, Idaho
94-96
the most drastic in effect anywhere
in the west and makes it a crime to
have liquor in possession even for
j medicinal use. Special permits
I issued for shipments of wine for sac
ramental use in the churches, but all
other shipments are strictly barred.
In spite of the vigilance of state
officials a great deal of liquor
brought into the state by bootleggers
and sold at from $6 to $11 a quart
according to the scarcity of the sup
ply. Since Nevada went dry on De
cember 16 bootlegging prices have
been mounting rapidly.
are
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MONEY to Loan
99
Being one of the foremost commercial banks of
this community—loaning money to responsible
is an important branch of this bank's service.
The First National insists only upon requirements
which are essential to sound banking.
If you have a mortgage loan falling due or wish
a new one, it will pay you to call on the First Na
tional.
immediately available.
Conservative business is always welcome.
men
No loan too large or small and funds are
H The First National Bank
OF MOSCOW
m
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Here's a REAL Buy!
V
u
We have 600 acres of the best land in the locality of Pomeroy
and located six miles this side of Pomeroy with 500 acres now in
fall wheat, a good stand and absolutely free from foul seeds of any
nature. The improvements are poor but the place has a good spring
and is well fenced and if deal is made at once we can give possession
this spring and include 2-3 of the crop at $70.00 per acre. The crop
now in had ought to almost pay for this land at this price. Reason
able terms.
ALSO
A good paying and well equipped pool room and confectionery
with several good rooms, all furnished, above the pool room, to trade
on Moscow property. What have you?
SEE
Chas E. Wa|ks & Company
TEL. 278
Idaho's bone-dry law gives sheriffs
and their deputies, as well as city
policemen power of search and seiz
ure. Any home or business establish
ment may be entered if reasonable sus
picion evists that liquor may be
the premises and thorough-going
search may be made by the officials.
on
A marriage license was issued to
day at the court house to Wm. H. El
liott and Mrs. May Whitcomb, both of
B'g Bear Ridge near Kendrick. Both
are wel known residents of that scc
tion of Latah

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