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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, January 21, 1919, Image 2

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The DAILY STAR-MIRROR
Published every evening except Sun
day, at Moscow, Idaho.
GEO. N. LANPHERE, Publisher.
The Official Newspaper of tl>< ' ity
_ Moscow. _
Entered as second-class matter Oct.
16, 1911, at the postoffice of Moscow,
Idaho, under the Act of Congress
March, 1879.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Delivered by carrier to any part
the city:
Per Month...
Three Months
Six Months..
One Year....
50c
$1.50
2.75
, 5.00
By Mail
(outside of city and on rural routes)
Per Month...
Three Months
Six Months..
One Year....
40c
$1.15
2.25
4.00
The (Weekly) Idaho Post:
$1.50
Per Year
MEMBER OF ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively
entitled to the use for republication
of all news-dispatches credited to
or not otherwise credited in this paper
and also the local news published
therein. .
All rights of republication of
special dispatches herein are also re
served. _
REFORMS OF PRIMARY ELEC
TION LAWS.
In nearly all western states efforts
will be made to reform the direct
primary nomination laws.
These reforms will proceed along
two lines—allowing state and county
conventions and making the primary
effective.
The latter line of reform includes
preservation of political party lines
and requiring majority vote to decide.
The abuse of the Non-partisan
League registering a^ of one party
and putting out party nominees on
its own platform is aimed at.
The absurdity of candidates run
ning on a ticket as republicans or
democrats but really bound hand and
foot to a socialist platform is appar
ent.
In cities, progress in primary elec
tion reform is simple—any candidate
at primary who has a majority of all
votes is declared elected.
Nominations in city elections are
made on petition and are not partisan
and a majority at a primary elects,
thus obviating another election.
This provision also shortens the bal
lot, as there are only contests for the
remaining offices in which case the
two receiving highest votes run.
County and state convehtions are
valuable educational gatherings in the
training of citizens for political duties
and must be restored.
In case of renominations or a can
didate running without opposition
there is no need of a direct primary,
the county or state convention nom
Nominations over which there is
spirited contest may well be left
the direct primary by the county
state central committees, majority
decide.
This primary election can be held
at the same time delegates are chosen
in the precincts for the county con
vention, delgates bound by precinct
vote.
Reforms on those lines would save
expense, shorten the ballot and pre
serve party harmony, and neither
party organization or direct voting
at the primary be destroyed as both
have valuable features.
*a !■"] Bas
A NECESSITY IN AMERICAN
MINING.
Eastern facories that have been
taking western manganese and zinc
pres during war time have called a
halt. They are using up their re
serves. By the time these are gone
they expect to go where they may to
purchase their ores and have ship
bottoms to bring them to American
ports. They are economic interna
tionalists. To them the west is no
better than a district in Bolivia or
Burmah or a Mexican state not too
far from our border. They import
from the cheapest part and sell in
the dearest—that is unsentimental
business and business is only senti
mental on paper.
As peace came the eastern manu
facturer saw prospect of plenty of
ships and immediately he turned his
attention for the raw materials which
he required} to foreign countries, for
the reason that American standards
of living do not prevail there and the
old law of supply and demand is in
effect in these benighted regions, con
sequently he can get his needs sup
plied at very much less cost to him.
Western states have awakened to
the need of a new tariff law and if
these states joined forces and consti
tute a "bloc" in congress for the bet
ter defense of western interests they
can do far more effective work in
getting needed protection for the
western mining industry.
If high wages are to be maintained
in this country some protection must
be given American industry which
has to compete with foreign compe
tition not governed by American
standards of living—call it tariff or
anything you like.
Ka pTS 1RJ
THE STATE CABINET BILL.
Under the caption of "Idaho Con
Interesting Experiment"
yesterday
siders an
The Spokesman - Review
published the following timely com
ment on the proposed legislation in
this state recommended in Governor
Davis' message with a view to the
economical conduct of the com
of
more
monwealth's business:
"If the Idaho legislature passes
Governor Davis' state cabinet bill, it
will have committed the state to one
of the most interesting experiments
of its kind that has been made in
recent years. It is an experiment
which other states in all parts of
the country would watch with close
attention, because it would be aimed
at the elimination of a condition that
almost any commonwealth would be
glad to do away with.
"The new Idaho governor finds that
there has grown up at Boise a long
list of commissionerships, boards and
bureaus, all appointive, to attend to
various phases of state affair. These
have been added to the machinery of
government one or two at a time,
by different legislatures and gov
ernors, until there is not enough of
fice room for them all. No office or
bureau, once created, has ever been
abolished, for that is the way with
public jobs.
"Governor Davis wants to create a
cabinet of nine commissioners, under
whom would be nonsalaried advisory
boards. The commissioners and the
boards would take over the duties of
all the present functionaries, and
would be responsible, under the gov
ernor, for all the miscellaneous ad
ministrative tasks of the state.
"As the Lewiston Tribune points
out, the test to be applied to the plan
is whether it actually will eliminate
useless offices and simplify the
mechanism of state government. If
it does not, then there is no reason
for going through the form of reor
ganization. But if it can be shown
that a cabinet will make the govern
ment of Idaho more compact, eco
nomical and efficient, there should
be no difficulty inducing the legisla
ture to give it a trial."
;
Newspaper men and politicians, and |
»I Mi
COMPULSORY VOTING.
in fact every person who has ever
had any connection with election work
is well acquainted with the direlect
It is always a task to get
some people to register and a greater
task to get them to the polls on elec
tion day, and in spite of the strenu
efforts of those interested in
voter.
ous
elections the registration and voting
will always fall away below the full
voting strength. An Oregon legislat
proposes to remedy this vexa- j
or now
tious problem by drawing up a bill i
that makes voting absolutely com-J
pulsory. This proposed law provides 1
a
to
or
to
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Be Sure to Get
A
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sealed package
with WRIGLEV'S
upon it is a guar
antee of quality.
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The (arrest chewing
gum factories in the
world—the largest
selling gum in the
world: that is what
WRIGLEV*S means.
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KEPT RIGHT
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The Flavor Lasts!
that every one entitled to vote must
register, and every one who registers
j must vote, with no ifs, ands or buts,
Even being sick or out of town does
not excuse failure to vote, for bal
lots may be sent by mail. County {
clerks must turn lists of direlects
over to the district attorneys, who
get a ten dollar fee for every prose
cution under the statute. Discussing
, , , . , , b
the merits of this proposed law, an ,
exchange says that this forecast may
be safely made:
That if the bill becomes a lew there
will be a heavy vote in the next Ore
gon elections, but there will not be
a heavy vote for the legislator who
got up the compulsory voting bill.
fe te Ha
( LIMESTONE GETS RESULTS.
Broome County, N. Y., this year
used 8,000 tons of limestone, an in
crease of 3,000 tons over the amount
used one year ago. This increase has
been due to the emphasis which the
farm bureau and county agent have
placed upon the value of applying
limestone to the soil. One farmer
applied 1 ton of ground limestone an
acre in 1917 at the time of seeding.
In 1918 the limed area produced 5,324
pounds of hay, while the plot beside
it having no lime produced only 4,017
pounds, 1,307 pounds in favor of lime.
Another farmer top-dressed hay land,
that had been mowed one, year, with
one-half ton of marl per acre. On
the limed area he secured 4,200
pounds of hay and on the unlimed
area 2,160 pounds, a difference of
2,040 pounds. Still another farmer
used 1 ton of lime an acre at the
time of seeding. On the limed acre
he produced 5,324 pounds of hay and
on the unlimed acre 2,904 pounds, a
difference of 2,420 pounds in favor of
limestone.
Colleges and advanced schools are
busy adjusting curriciilums and meth
ods to the peace period, says an ex
change. Which reminds us that ed
ucational methods may always be im
proved or readjusted to conditions, to
give students a more favorable oppor
tunity; but the individual must be
equipped for assimilation, otherwise
all the educational methods evolved
cannot be of any advantage to him.
The desire for knowledge and the
mental equipment to put it into effect
are what count.
The secretary of the treasury has
just placed an additional sum of one
hundred million dollars to the credit
of Italy, making the otal of the Ameri
can loans to that country for war ex
penses $1,310,000,000, and our total
loans to all of the allies $8585,000000
Isa Isa fe
Do your work a litle better than the
other fellow, and some morning you
«'ill wake up and find yourself boss.
DR.
Postoffice Inspector Fullenwinder,
w '*-h headquarters in Spokane, passed
through the city yesterday on his way
to Lewiston on official business.
+ ♦ + + + ♦ +
*
♦ + + + ♦ + + <• + + ♦ + ♦♦♦,♦
MARKETS
+
The following market quotations
are the prices paid to the producer
J»7 the dealer and are changed daily,;
thus giving the public the accurate
quotations in all classes of grain,
produce and meats.
Hay and Grain.
Wheat, Marquis, bulk.
Wheat, Bluestem No. 1, bulk,
net, delivered to warehouses 2.03
Wheat, Bluestem No. 1, sacked
net, delivered to warehouses 2.12
Wheat, Fortyfold, No. 1, bulk
net, delivered to warehouses 2.03
Wheat, Fortyfold, No. 1, s'k'd
net, delivered to warehouses 2.12
Wheat, White Club, No. 1, bulk
net, delivered to warehouses 2.01
Wheat, White Club. No. 1, s'k'd
net, delivered to warehouses 2.10
Wheat, Red Russian, No. 1. blk
net, delivered to whses. 1.97 1.98
Wheat, Red Russian, No. 1 skd
net, del. to whses.2.06 Vs 2.07
No. 1 Feed Oats, sacked, per
cwt, net, delivered to ware
houses .
No. 1 Timothy Hay....
White Beans, per pound
Produce.
$2.05
2.85
$34.00
.07
50c
Eggs, per doz.
Butter, creamery, per lb
Butter, ranch, per lb...
Potatoes, per cwt.
Young chickens, per lb.
Hens, live wt.
Old Roosters, per lb....
Hogs, live wt., light, per [email protected]
Hogs, live wt., heavy, per lb. [email protected]
Hogs, dressed, heavy, per lb ...,17c
Hogs, dressed, light, per lb.. ,[email protected]
Veal, live wt., per lb.
Veal, dressed, per lb
Spring lambs, per lb.
Mutton, per lb..
68c
60c
70c
[email protected]
[email protected]
8c
[email protected]>c
[email protected]
,[email protected]
. [email protected]
LATAH COUNTY
TITLE & TRUST COMPANY
Abstracts of Title Conveyancing
Mortgage Loans
PROFESSIONAL CARDS
PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS
DR. C. L. GRIT^IAN—Physician and
surgeon, 720 So. Main. Phone 27.
DR. JOHN W. STEVENSON—Eye
Ear, Nose and Throat.
Fitted. Office of Dr. Aspray, 303
3rd Ave. Phone 177.
Glasses
F. M. LEITCH—Physician, Com
mercinl Bldg. Phone 223Y.
W. A. ADAIR
Creighton, Blk. Phone 85.
Physician,
OSTEOPATH•
W. M. HATFIELD—Osteopath.
Creighton Bldg. Phone 48.
CHIROPRACTIC
ZONA BIGGS—Chiropracuc, Steeh
Bldg. Phone 331H.
DENTISTS
DR. J. A. McDANIELS—Dentist, First
Nat'l Bank Bldg. Phone 229.
DR. H. J. SMITH— Dentist, Urqu
hart BIdg. Phone 9.
LAWYERS
A. L. MORGAN—Lawyer, Urquhart
Bldg. Phone 75.
A. H. OVERSMTTH
Atttorney-at
Law. Urquhart Bldg. Phone 208.
ORLAND & LEE-—Attorneys-at-Law,
First Natl. Bank Bldg. Phones Or
land 104. Lee 104L.
H. R. SMITH—Attorney-at-Law, First
Natl. Bank Bldg., Third St. Entrance.
Phone 43Y,
GUY W. WOLFE—Attorney. 112 E.
2nd. Phone 17Y.
JOHN NISBET—Attorney-at-law, 1st
Nat'l Bank Bldg. Phone 131J.
IMPROVEMENT PARLOR
MARIE SHANNON.—Rooms 18 and
Phone 122J.
19 Urquhart Bldg.
Shampooing, massage and manicur
ing.
TAXI CAB
C. L. DREW.—Phone, office 272;
residence, 3.
v
ARCHITECTS
C. RICHARDSON, ARCHITECT
Skattaboe Blk., phone 200.
FLORISTS
SCHOTT BROS — Proprietors, North
Main. Phone 289.
VETERINARY
DR. E. T. BAKER—Assistant State
Veterinarian. Residence Sixth and
Washington, phone 243.
DR. J. D. ADAMS — Veterinary, 220
South Asbury. Phone 15Y.
AUCTIONEER
CHAS. E. WALKS—Auctioneer, Urqu
hart Blgd. Phone 278.
CREAMERY
MOSCOW CREAMERY — 66 cents
paid for butter fat. Ice cream, bulk
and brick in cold storage.
HIDES AND JUNK
HIGHESTPRICES PAID FOR
hides and junk—Moscow Hide and
Junk Co., 308 W. 6th St. Will call
city or country. Phone 252.
EXPERT PIANO TUNING
Phone 189-W
OATMEAL
BLEND
MAY NOW BE PURCHASED IN
NTNE-POUN® SACKS: ASK
YOUR GROCER FOR IT. IT IS
CHEAPER 1> THAT SIZE
PACKAGE.
|
j
You will find you save more
and live better if you trade at
the
THIRD STREET
MARKET
CHICKENS, GEESE, DUCKS
AND HIDES WANTED
L. M. KITLEY
PHONE 248
Per
$ 1,000
ACRE!
GROWING
THE ALTON IMPROVED
Red Raspberry
The greatest money-maker on rec
ord. Get my book, THE FARM
ERS KEY TO SUCCESS, only 60c,
worth $100 to any farmer. Money
back if not satisfied. Pamphlet
free.
H. A. PINEGAR
Wellington, Utah.
Thompson Insurance Agency
Fire Insurance, Automobile and
Plate Glass Insurance, Fidelity and
Casualty Bonds
J. G. Vennigerholz, Prep.
Moscow, Idaho.
FOR FIRST CLASS SHOE
REPAIRING
OILING AND REPAIRING
HARNESS
go to
J. N. FRIEDMAN
HARNESS SHOP
FINEST LINE OF HIGH GRADE
WOOLENS. YOUR INSPECTION
SOLICITED
O. H. SCHWARZ, Tailor.
Monuments
THE MOSCOW MARBM
WORKS
George H. Moody, Proprietor
Has the finest line of Monuments
and all Kinds of Marble Work to
be found in the Inland Empire
PRICES REASONABLE
See Our Work Before Ordering
H-F-H-H-H-H
-:-r
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*
Hotel Moscow
3.
V
X
4.
;
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TOM WRIGHT, Prop.
i
*
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V
*
Thoroughly Modern J
A
V
I
FIRST CLASS GRILL
t AUTO BUS AT ALL TRAINS
A
*
v
A Bank's
Greatest
Asset
Cannot be expressed in
figures, but lies in its his
, tory of service and sound
business principles.
On its enviable record
through many years of
unfailing usefulness this
bank solicits your busi
ness, offering the sapie 1
liberal treatment that has
always marked its policy.
FIRST TRUST
& SAVINGS BANK
Capital $100,000
[CLASSIFIED ADS
HELP WANTED—Female
WANTED—A GIRL FOR GENERAL,
housework. Mrs. I. R. Boyd, Phon>*
91-tf
316H,
WANTED—A GIRL AT THE GEM
95-97
Cafe, at once. Phone 155J
FOR RENT—Rooms
FOR RENT — LIGHT HOUSE
keeping rooms, close in. 124 South
Almond. Phone 15R.
79ti
FOR RENT.—FURNISHED OR UN
furnished housekeeping rooms; pri
vate bath. Call 46.
80-tf
FOR RENT —A ROOM WITH OR
without sleeping porch; hot and cold
"?ter; modern conveniences; price rea
t nabe. 425 East Third St. Mrs. D.
quhart.
13tf
FOR RENT—FURNISHED APART
rooms at
Eggans apartments. Phone 205H.
231-tf
ments and furnished
FOR RENT—Houses
FOR RENT.—AN EIGHT ROOrâ#
modern house, on Deakin Ave., eaS:
of dormitory. Phone 170J. 83-tf
FOR RENT. —7 ROOM HOUSE,
bath, toilet, electric lights, cellar,
good repair, tow blocks from Main
street. Barn, chicken park, good lo
cation. Rent, $17 per mo. C. H.
Patten. _ 78-102
FOR RENT—FIVE ROOM HOUSE
Corner Main and Morton. Phone
1Y. J. E. Mudgett. 44-tf
W ANTED—Miscellaneous
WANTED—GOOD LIVE DEALER
to sell the best truck on the market.
Can make deliveries 1 to 5 tons. Write
Rochester Motor Co., 1012 Sprague
Ave., Spokane, Wash.
235-tf
WANTED TO RENT—AN OFFICE
desk. Telephone 362.
291-tf
LIVESTOCK WANTED
WANTED — GOOD FRESH COW.
Call 295, Idaho Hotel.
87-tf
FOR SALE—Real Estate
FOR SALE FOR ONE-HALF WHAT
it is worth-—6-room modern house -
good-sized brick basement; brick floor
in basement; close in. Price, for a
quick sale, $1000.00. Enquire A. B
Mclntire. 97-9S
II ROOM HOUSE, 60-FOOT LOT
So. Asbury; Price $2,500. Phone
Mrs. M. E. Lawrence, Moscow
88-115
39H.
FOR SALE. A MODERN 8-ROOM
house. Equipped with electric
stove, laundry and other conveniences
Apply 614 E "O '
Phone 141Y 84tf
FOR SALE OR TRADE—20S ACRES
of timber land 8 miles from Moscow ;
for Moscow property preferred!
Call 201L, Moscow. 5gtj
FOR SALE —HOUSE AND LOT,
corner First and Polk Sts. Inquire
Mrs. Wm. Arnett. 244tf
FOR SALE— Live Stock
FOR SALE—WORK HORSES. 3
miles north of Moscow. Roy Nav
lor. Phone 9118, 97-103
TWO GOOD TEAMS—ONE TEAM
years old this spring, wt. 2600;
the other 4 years, wt. 2800. Standard
Lumber Co. Yards, Moscow.
six
93-tf
I HAVE A PURE BRED REGISTER
ed Holstein bull, originating from
John L. Smith's herd, Spokane, for
service and sale at Neely's barn ; serv
ice $2.50 in advance; see Mr. Neely at
the barn. E. J. Armbrusten
S9tf
FOR SALE—Poultry
FOR SALE—FULL BLOODED
White Leghorn Cockerels. Phone
Farmers 9054. 97-101
FOR SALE—FULL BLOODED RED
Cockrel, Eggs for setting in season.
1 hone Farmers 9196. 96-102
FOR SALE—Miscellaneous
LIMITED AMOUNT OF GOOD
white clean oats, suitable for seed
J. G. Gibson.
97-tf
$400 BUYS MY 1917 FORD IN Ex
cellent shape.
191N
3 new tires. Call
95-100
WE ARE IN THE MARKET FOR
apples. Washburn & Wilson Pro
duce Co. _ 95-100
FOR SALE.—200 CORDS WOOD,
fir, tamarac and pine, delivered
anywhere in Moscow. E. B. Brock
way. Phone 1 66J. 79-tf.
FOR SALE.—J. I. CASE 28-INCH
Threshing Machine Outfit. Phone
899X4.
76-101
JOLINE - KNIGHT 7-PASSENGER
touring car, in good condition, for sale
r trade. Moscow Auto & Supply Co,
283tf
WE ARE IN THE MARKET FOR
choice stock of any kind of peas,
beans, potatoes, corn and garden
seeds that are true to name. Wash
burn & Wilson Produce Co. 95-100
SELDEN TRUCKS SOLD ON DE
ferred payment plan. Write Rochester
Motor Co,, 1012 Sprague Ave., Spo
235-tf
kane, Wash.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST—BETWEEN IDAHO NAT'L
Harvester and R. A. Patterson's
gate, a glove.
9226.
Finder please call
96-tf

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