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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, January 23, 1919, Image 3

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1919-01-23/ed-1/seq-3/

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ORPHEUM
THE PARAMOUNT THEATRE
Do You Enjoy a Good Laugh?
SEE
BILLIE
BURKE
in "LET'S GET A DIVORCE'
and
"THE CABBAGE QUEEN"
Last Time Tonight
— Friday Only
CHARLES RAY
in
/
CLAWS OF THE HUN
A Surprise — Change
Complete and an old favorite—(Of
course its a Paramount) Watch for it
SATURDAY
5
J. E. Mudgett, from north of Mos
cow, was in the city yesterday .
Mrs. Joe Hasfuther and daughter.
Miss Veronica of Genesee were in Mos
cow yesterday shopping. Mrs. Has
futher is expecting her son, John,
home from Camp Lewis. He has been
in the service six months with the en
gineers.
Mr. and Mrs. Rasmus E. Lee left
yesterday for Spokane on at pleasure
trip and to attend the poultry show.
A. S. Jacobs of Spokane, represent
ative of the Idaho State Life Insur
ance company, is in Moscow on busi
ness.
Mr. and Mrs. M. C. Priddy returned
last evening from a trip to the coast.
Mrs. J ,H. Wakefield and children
of Portland arrived last evening to vis
it with Prof, and Mrs. H. L. Ax tell.
Mrs. Wakefield and Mrs. Axtell were
friends in college.
Mrs. A. M. Mclnturff and two chil
dren, who live southeast of Moscow,
called
by illness of influenza of Mrs. Mcln
turff 's mother and sisters.
Wm. Staples has an exhibition in
the Spokane poultry show two White
Rock cockerels. Rasmus Lee is show
ing one Rhode Island Red cockerel.
The tractor school which was to
have begun January 27th, at the Uni
versity will be postponed until a later
date. It will be announced in The
Star-Mirror when it will open.
The department of history of the
Historical Club will meet with Mrs.
Kendrick at 2:30 p. m., Friday, Jan
uary 24th.
Mrs. E. Macy, east of Moscow, is
enjoying a visit with her sister, Mrs.
Margaret Lewis of Sandpoint.
For sale, Jonathan and Rome
Beauty apples. Phone Farmers 9138.
93-119
F. H. Schreiber, of Spokane was in
town Wednesday. Mr. Schreiber was
formerly in the implement business
in Moscow.
Mrs. R. Knepper of Kendrick, for
mer county superintendent of schools
is a visitor in Moscow today.
Mrs. Ida Burch and son, Chas.
Davis and daughter, Mrs. Fly, of Pa
louse, are visiting with Mrs. Burch's
daughter, Mrs. J. C. Spray, south of
Moscow.
Mrs! W. H. Hill and little grand
daughter, JIargaret Shepherd, went
to Joel today to visit with Mrs. Hill's
sister, Mrs. J. O. Walker.
Miss Mary Weirick, who has been
visiting with Mrs. F. L. Allen, went to
her home today, at Lewiston.
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Hunter returned
today from a business trip to Spokane.
Mrs. P. H. Doyle of Butte, Mont.,
is visiting at the home of her brother,
Homer Hill.
Mrs. G. Shostrom and son, Gus, of
Troy, are trading in Moscow today.
Another son, Edwin, returned Jan. 15,
from 3 1-2 months in the army serv
ice.
99
Carlyle Sumner of Joel, has been
visiting in Moscow the past ten days.
Mrs. G .W. Oliver arrived today
from Pullman to make a short visit
with her sister, Mrs. B. C. Coffey.
Allen Snook has sold the farm of
100 acres he recently purchased just
south of Moscow, to Arthur Snow.
Mr. Snow will make his permanent
Home there.
J. A. Kite is having as guests at his
home, his sisters, Mrs. Shull of Wasco,
Oregon, Mrs. Sworden of Briggs,
Oregon, Mrs. Nye of Beverly, Wash.,
and nis nephew, George Shull of Juli
aetta.
Mr. and Mrs. M. Trenary of Juli
aetta are business visitors in Moscow
today.
Mrs. H. P. Hull returned to her
home in Kendrick last evening after
a visit with Mrs. D. Holman.
On the committee appointed to as
sist in procuring labor for returning
spldiers, the name of T. A. Meeker
was omitted in yesterday's paper.
Note these prices per cord for good
quality sawed wood delivered. Pine
$8.00; fir and tamarack $9.60. Also
we offer good quality baled alfalfa
hay at $27 per ton at our mill. Mark
P. Miller Milling Co. 92-tf ;
Mr and Mrs. M. E. Henry of Pa
louse are trading today in Moscow.
IDAHO INDUSTRIAL NOTES
Canadian government-owned rail
roads showed a deficit of $8,000,000,
but what are examples to the hyster
ical slaves to an idea ?
Idaho woolgrowers have decided to
hold clips and make no contracts for
1919.
Caldwell will expend $50,000 this
year for paving.
Caribel to have narrow gauge rail
road for transporting logs to mill.
Salmon.—Harmony mine to con
struct mill costing about $45,000 near
here.
Lewiston.—This highway district
votes $113,000 bonds for construction
of link of Lewis and Clark highway
from Spalding to Clearwater county
line.
Wallace.—Much ore in sight at
Tarbox; will ship ore soon; new mill
in spring.
Nampa—Farmers Society of Equity
of city, plans new equipment and
home.
New Meadows to have new sawmill.
Boilers, engines and machinery ar
rive.
Oakley. —Patent issued to Idaho by
U. S. land office for 20,500 acres of
Carey act land under Twin Falls
Oakley Reservoir company project.
Federal government planning great
system of park to park highways.
Idaho metal output dropped $19,
011,542 in 1918. Due to labor short
age caused by war says state mine
inspector.
State closes year with over $700,000
in treasury.
Those who would exclude all immi
gration take a narrow
al traditions and national needs for
development.
Caldwell.—In order to guarantee
good market for potatoes in 1919,
growers in Canyon county now mak
ing arrangements for selling product
of next fall.
Total expenditures for Idaho's edu
cational institutions for past biennium
$1,791,657.
Nineteen bushels winter wheat to
acre record for many irrigated sec
tions of Idaho.
Fairfield.—Clipper Gold Mining &
Milling Co. to be financed and de-
veloped.
--S#
Spokane Shippers' Claims Denied.
WASHINGTON.—Claims aggregat-
ing two million dollars against trans-
continental railroads by shippers of
Spokane, Washington, and the Inland
Empire were today denied by the in-
terstate commerce commission. Suits
for these claims had been filed af+er
the commission had decided that the
general system of rates in vogue
among the transcontinental lines dis-
criminated against Spokane and other
intermountain points.
- ts
LONDON, Jan.—The Rev. William
Ralph Inge, dean of St. Paul's, devoted
large part of a speech the other day
to answering the question, "What is
an English gentleman?"
He quoted Bernard Shaw as saying;
"A gentleman is a man who tries
not to take out of life than he
puts in." "That," said the dean, "is
a revolutionary definition, but it is
strictly true to what at heart we all
feel to be the character o fa gentle
man, and it is a saying which cannot
be rubbed in too vigorously in train
(ing the young gentleman.
"According to the English school of
thought, the usual qualities of a
gentleman are truthfulness, courage,
justice and fair play, the abhorrence
50 Eggs a Day
"Since using 'More Eggs' I get 40
to 50 eggs a day instead of 8 or 9,"
writes A. P. Woodard of St. Cloud,
Fla. This scientific tonic has made
big egg profits for thousands of
poultry raisers all over the U. S. Get
ready now and make big profits out
of your hens this winter. A $1.00
package will double the egg produc
tion and a million dollar bank guar
antees to refund your money if you
are not entirely satisfied. Send $1.00
now to E. J. Reefer, the poultry ex
pert, 233 Main Street, Kansas City,
Mo., or send $2.25 and get 3 regular
$1.00 packages on special discount
for a full season's supply. Or write
for bis valuable FREE book that tells
the experience of a man who has
made a fortune out of poultry.
e
I
No Coffee
Reaction.
When You
Drink
ft
P0STDM
Ahot drink that
braces one on a
winter day wtfcbr
out. artificial • •
stimulation, and
the subsequent
letdown some
times felt by
coffee drinkers
No "caffeine "in
POSTOM
There's a Reason"
4 «
of meanness and crooked dealing, and
respect for the personality of human
beings as such."
-IS!
E. W. Pearce Lands New Job.
Word has been received that E. W.
Pearce, who is well known in Mos
cow as a former employee of the First
National Bank, and x-ecently chief
deputy bank examiner, has been elect
ed director and cashier of the Ban
nock National bank of Pocatello.
f
Hofei Moscow' Arrivals.
W. H. Stevens, W. Finlay, B. Dick
son, C. R. Ede. Frank Smith, L. G.
Burr, Spokane; L. E. McMaster, Se
attle; Mrs. Joe Hasfurther, Miss Ver
onica Hasfurther, Genesee; H. J. Ben
nett, Klamath Falls; R. D. Jones, Se
attle; W. A. Cole, M. B, Hopkins, C.
W. Lownsbury, Spokane; D. P. Phil
lips, Tekoa, Wash.; Ed L. Moon,
Portland; S. H. Berman, Cincinnati:
R. J. Leth, Boise: P. H. Schreiber,
Lewiston; Albert Bensinger, Chicago;
L. J. Strader, G. B. Mann, Spokane.
UNIVERSITY STUDENTS
WANT WORK IN MOSCOW
Wanted: Jobs for 46 students of
the University of Idaho. Capable men
and are willing to perform any and
all kinds of work in order to gain hn
education. These men appeal to the
good people of Moscow to furnish
them such employment as: Bank
clerks, stenographers, store clerks,
waiters in hotels, restaurants and
homes, janitors, furnace attendants,
snow shoveling, carpet and rug clean
ing, window washing, floor scrubbing,
wood splitting and stacking, coal and
wood carrying, lawn work, doing
chores for board and room or any
other work will be cheerfully per
formed at a reasonable rate per hour
or by the week.
Phone your request to No. 54, bur
sar's office.
!
94-120
ns.
LODGE HOLDS ANNUAL
INSTALLATION SERVICES
The Eastern Star lodge held its an
nual installation serviced in their
lodge hall at the Masonic temple Tues
day evening. The installation was
conducted by the retiring matron,
Mrs. Mary A. Shields, who is also the
associate grand conductress of the
grand chapter, assisted by the past
grand marshall, Mabel Price. The
following officers were installed;
Worthy Matron, Bertha Nankervis.
Worthy Patron, C. C. Vincent.
Associate Matron, Lillian Skattahoe.
Secretary, Mary G, Cook.
Treasurer, John Canham.
Conductress, Maud R. Iddings.
Associate conductress, Edna Heck
athorne.
Chaplain, Laura Canham.
Marshall, Alice Livingston.
Organist, Lorraine Grice.
Ada. Theodora Baker.
Ruth. Sarah Brooks.
Esther, Odalite Vincent.
Martha, Magdalena Staples.
Electa, Minnie Byrnes.
Warder, Ida M. Stenger.
Sentinel, Wm. Staples.
"
POTLATCH NEWS ITEMS
POTLATCH.—In a raid on the Ital
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Spruce Production Corporation
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Sealed Bids Will Be Received on the Following- Equipment
from January 15, 1919, up to 11 A. M. February 15, 1919
RAILROAD
EQUIPMENT
DONKEY
ENGINES
TRUCKS and
AUTOMOBILES
Trucks
Logging, Hoisting and Loading
Willamette, Tacoma,
Smith & Watson,
Washington and
other makes.
Sizes ranging from
6%-in. x 10-in.
Rails
20-lb. Relayer
20-lb. New ...
86-lb. Relayer
40-lb. Relayer
46-lb. New ...
46-lb. Relayer
54-lb. Relayer
60-lb. New ...
67%-lb. New ,
80-lb. New. ..,
. 684 Tons
, 40 Tons
26 Tons
. 147 Tons
.1727 Tons
. 499 Tons
56 Tons
2581 Tons
5030 Tons
2910 Tons
Packards, 1% to 5-Ton
Standards, 1% to 5-Ton
Darts, 1%-Ton Denbys, 2-Ton
Seldens, 2-Ton Velies, 1%-Ton
Uniteds, 1 % -Ton
Gramm-Bernsteins, 2% -Ton
Fédérais, 3-Ton
Garfords, 3% -Ton
to
Locomotives
Geared and Rod, 36 to 70-Ton,
Shays, New Yorks, Baldwins,
Heislers, Climax, etc.
Logging Trucks
Connected and disconnected,
60,000 to 80,000 capacity.
13-in. x 14-in.
/
c Automobiles
Cadillacs, Seven-Passenger
Dodges, Five-Passenger
Fords, Five-Passenger
A. C Electric Motors
440-volt, 3-phase, 60-cycle,
3 to 75 H. P., with or
without starters
,
À
A
Also OTHER MACHINERY and EQUIPMENT FOR SALE
*
For Terms, Full Information and Descriptive Catalogue of
Equipment, Address All Inquiries to the
à
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SALES BOARD
?
..life
United States
Spruce Production Corporation
Yeon Building, Portland, Oregon
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C RESCENT is the safe, economical
taking p° W{ i er - It is made of the
purest ingred'ents in correct scientific
proportions. Crescent raises first when
moisture is added in the mixing bowl, and
then again when heat is applied.
Thus you can depend absolutely upon
Crescent to produce the most wholesome,
light and easily digested biscuits, cakes
and breads. Write for • Crescent Cook
Book.
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14
ian quarters last night by Sheriff John
Woody, Deputy Chas. Summerfield
and Prosecuting Attorney John Nisbet
about 60 gallons of "Dago Red" were
confiscated and will be held as evi
dence. There has been considerable
complajnt in the past regarding the
use of "Dago Red" or raisin wine, for
although it is intoxicating, it is claim
ed to be non-alcoholic. The wine will
be held until it can be determined un
der what head it will be classified.
Felix L. Stapleton, manager of the
Potlatch Mercantile company's gar
age, has returned home after an ab
sence of three or four months. Mr.
Stapleton was in an officers' train
ing school at Camp Grant w'hen the
armistice was signed. He has again
taken up h s diu.es as garage man
ager.
The flu situation is much imnrnve'i
again there being but five cases on the
list. Miss Mabel Egan, who has been
seriously ill at her home, is improving.
All other cases are reported doing
nicely.
Ps
NEW AUTO ELECTRICAL
SUPPLY HOUSE FOR MOSCOW
E. C. Hall, Late of the Ü. S. Army
Transport Corps Will Engage hi
Business Here.
A new business venture is soon to
be launched in this city by E. C. Hall,
who has leased the Thompson building
opposite the postoffice on Third street,
where he will install a stock of elec
trical supplies for automobiles,
new firm will be known as the Auto
Electric Supply company.
Mr. Hall was similarly engaged in
business at Elv. Nevada, until he sold
The
his interests in order to enter the mot
or transport corps of the United
States army, from which he has re
cently been discharged.
The business will carry a complete
stock of new batteries, parts and
rentals for every car. They will han
dle all classes of starting, lighting
and ignition works, representing such,
firms as the Bosch Magnito company
and Northwest Electric company. It
will be a Willard storage battery serv
ice station. An institution of this
kind promises to be a convenience to
the motoring public and will certainly
be an addition to Moscow.
Mr, Hall lived in Moscow when a
lad, being the grandson of our pioneer
resident. Mrs. E C. Hall of Third
street. Mr. and Mrs. Hall have taken
apartments at the Casey residence on
Monroe street.

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