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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, January 28, 1919, Image 1

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The Daily Star-Mirror
MOSCOW, LATAH COUNTY, IDAHO TUESDAY, JANUARY 28, 1919
AMERICAINS AND BRITISH HOLD BOLSHEVIKI
TOLUME VIII
NUMBER 103
The Bolsheviki continue to attack the British and American forces in
Siberia, but the allied troops are holding their lines today. The Bolsheviki
have burned the town of Shenkursk, taken from the American and Russian
forces yesterday and the inhabitants are being massacred,
appears to be growing critical, for the Bolsheviki greatly outnumber the
allied forces.
The Spartacan forces in Germany, which were thought to be subdued, have
arisen at Wilhelmshaven and overthrown the government and are putting
up a hard fight for control of that province.
Lenine, Bolsheviki premier, from his hiding place in Yamburg, has issued
an order for the murder of all of the burgeoise and the recapture of the town
of Narva, in Esthonia, within one week.
The Germans are sending troops against the Poles and a real war seems
about to be staged between the Germans and Polanders.
Germany is to lose every one of her colonies. This has been definitely
settled by the peace conference. Not a nation on the allied side is willing
to give back her colonies to Germany, fearing they might be used for sub
marine bases. The conference has begun discussing the division of German
colonies among the allied nations. President Wilson has submitted a plan
for the internationalization of German colonies and this plan was discussed
today.
The cable and telegraphic dispatches received today follow:
The situation
Bolsheviki Fail to Dislodge Americans.
ARCHANGEL, Monday.—(By Associated Press.)-—-Bolsheviki forces failed
in their attempt last midnight, to drive the American and British forces
from positions at Tuglas, on the Dvina river, southeast of Archangel. Ear
lier the enemy bombarded the position with artillery.
According to refugees, the Bolsheviki have burned Shenkursk and mas
sacred many of the inhabitants. The Bolsheviki are shelling Tarveso, 40
miles east of Shenkursk, today, apparently preparatory to another infantry
attack in this region.
Lenine Orders More Massacres.
STOCKHOLM.—Premier Lenine, according to a report from Reval, has
ordered Bolsheviki troops to retake the town of Narva from the Esthonians
within one week and to sack the town and kill all Burgeoise. Lenine is
reported as staying at Yamburg, east of Narva.
Germans Send Troops Against Poles.
PARIS.—Two full corps of German troops have been assembled by the
general staff to oppose the Poles Eight troop trains are passing through
Frankfort-on-the-Oder, daily, according to Zurich dispatches to the Journal
from Baden.
Spartacans Overthrown Government.
COPENHAGEN.—Spartacan forces have overturned the government in
Wilhelmshaven, Germany. They have occupied the banks and public build
ings and ordered the court martial of their opponents. Railway traffic
to and from Wilhelmshaven has been stopped.
Germans Repulse Bolsheviki.
BERLIN, Monday.—Forces marching on Libau, on the Baltic coast in
Courtand have been halted by the German volunteer forces which, though
greatly outnumbered, forced the soviet army back across the Windau river,
says a dispatch to the Zeitung am Mittag.
Turkish Cabinet Resigns to Save Loot.
SALONIKI, Monday.—According to a semi-official statement issued here
today, the Turkish cabinet, headed by Tewfik Pasha, has resigned as a
result of the allied demands that Turkey restore all property carried away
during the war from occupied territories and cease drastic measures against
the Greeks and Armenians.
Will Divide Germany's Colonies Among Allies.
PARIS.—When the supreme council of the peace conference assembled
today there were present, in addition to the full membership of the body,
Premier Hughes, of Australia, and one of the Chinese representatives and
several technical advisers on colonial matters.
Attention for the moment was centered chiefly on the plan presented by
President Wilson for the internationalization of German colonial possessions.
This virtually monopolized the attention of the council which summonded
representatives from New Zealand, Australia and China into the hearings.
Australia claims German New Guinea; New Zealand claims Samoa; and
Japan desires the Marshal and Caroline Islands.
Pershing to Rush American Troops Home.
PARIS.—General Pershing rpports that by April he will be dispatching
American troops homeward at the rate of 300,000 monthly. It appears to
be considered that no matter how rapidly Pershings's forces may be de
mobilized they will not add to the difficulties of unemployment.
$100,000,000 Food Relief Bill Passed.
WASHINGTON.—Final legislative action was taken today by congress on
the administration bill appropriating $100,000,000 requested by President
Wilson for European famine relief. The conferees report was adopted by
both the house and the senate without debate. The measure now goes to
President Wilson for his approval.
MEN 01 WAGES
IS II VEXING ONE
HIGH WAGES ADDS TO COST OF
LIVING—BOTH EXPECTED TO
TAKE A TUMBLE
The immediate problem before the
United States is whether private in
dustry can keep up the high wages
paid during the war.
Manufacturers have raised the
question whether this country will be
able to maintain its share of world
trade on an eight-hour work day basis
and at the present abnormally high
scale of wages.
President Gompers struck back at
. "all the Bourbons in the United
States" who try to rob labor of the
advantages it has ganied during the
war.
But the New York Sun points out
'that a three-dollar-a-day wage that
will support a man and his family in
comfort is better than the ten-dollar
a-day wage that leaves him without a
job.
The American people believe in high
wages and a high standard of living.
But it seems that very high wages,
prevailing, under stress of war, can
not be duplicated in private industry
in peace times.
The advance in wages has been pre
dicted on high cost of living, and that
high er wages have resulted in higher
livipg costs.
Take, for example, coal and milk.
Coal
wages to meet higher living costs,
d this was reflected in a higher
price for coal. Milk is bringing a
record price.
In explaining the latest advance of
a cent per quart, Mr. Hoover, the
food administrator, said: "The labor
operators advanced miners'
an
adjustment, board raised wages of
employes of distributors one cent a
quart. Some one has to pay and it
is always the poor consumer."
Milk went up because wages went
Up. This is typical of the whole in
dustrial situation.
Already the price of commodities
have dropped sharply since the armis
tice.—The Manufacturer.
fa
AMERICAN SAILORS NEEDED
TO MAN GERMAN SHIPS
PARIS.—American naval author
ities here are doing everything possi
ble to avoid adding to the number of
unemployed in the United States by
retaining in the service every able
bodied sailor who can be induced to
remain. Instructions have been given
to discharge no man who does not
desire to leave and who has no present
prospect of employment.
Apprehension is expressed in naval
circles that there will be a real short
age of sailors for the navy on this
side of the Atlantic, owing to the ex
pectation that a large number will be
required to man the German mer
chant ships which the United States
is to take over under the terms of the
armistice.
given for the sudden change in orders
to a number of men who were about
to start for the United States, but are
being held in French ports.
This is the explanation
+++++♦+♦+++++♦♦♦+
Will Restrict Immigration.
*
+
*
*
♦ WASHINGTON.— Legislation *
+ prohibiting general immigration +
♦ for four years following the sign- +
♦ ing of the peace treaty was ap- ♦
+ proved tentatively today by the +
+ house immigration committee. •§•
+ It is understood the committee ♦
♦ was divided seven to two for the ♦
♦ legislation, with six members ab- ♦
♦ sent. ♦
+++++++++++++++++
BREAKS INTO JAIL AND
STEALS WITNESS LIQUOR
RIGBY, Idaho.—Prohibition history
recites numerous instances of men
getting into jail for possessing liquor
contrary to the law, but a reversal
was recorded here recently when some
person or persons broke into the
county jail and stole 30 cases of
liquor. The beverage had been seized
at different times and was stored in
the jail awaiting court orders to
destroy it.
The thief, or thieves, stole all that
was in the jail. The sheriff recovered
the loot, however, tracing part of it
to Rexburg and the remainder to
Plano.
CHARGE AMERICAN
SOLDIERS ARE BAD
WAR DEPARTMENT TO INVESTI
GATE SERIOUS CHARGES MADE
BY PARIS PAPERS
PARIS.—Thirty-four murders, 220
day and night assaults and nearly 500
serious fights due to American sol
diers, occurred in the department of
the Seine during the month of De
cember, says the Matin today.- The re
inforcement of the police conting
ent had been demanded by Brig. Gen.
Wm. W. Harts, the newspaper asserts
and with the new organization ef
fected police operations have been
carried out on a wholesale scale, es
pecially in the Menmarte section, re
sulting in the arrest of many Ameri
can deserters.
Another of the Paris newspapers,
the Intransigeant, welcomes the rein
forcement of the American police ser
vice in these days, when, it says, at
tacked by armed men were becoming
over-common and jewelry stores were
being robbed in full daylight.
"For it must be said," says the In
transigeant, "and our friends of the
United States deplore the fact like
ourselves, that the audacity of some
of their 'bad lots' has grown marvel
ously since the armistice."
Incredible, Washington Says.
WASHINGTON.—Official
tion will be sought by the war depart
ment concerning reports in Paris
newspapers that American soldiers
have been involved in a crime wave.
Secretary Baker said yesterday that
the situation pictured in the papers
"seemed incredible" and that official
reports from France made no mention
of the matter.
It was said at the war department
that disturbances of a minor charac
ter were to be expected where many
men, freed for the moment from close
military restraint were involved, but
the figures given by the French pa
pers indicated a most serious situa
tion.
Mrs. Anna Weber of Nespelem,
Wash., was in Moscow and Deary the
past week, called by the death of her
son, George Weber, aged 18 years,
George was in Moscow visiting
informa
f.
GEORGE WEBER DIED
AT DEARY THIS WEEK
when he was called to join the state
militia at Wenatchee, Wash., which
he had joined some time ago while j
working at Wenatchee. He was not:
feeling well when he left Moscow and
when stopping overnight in Spokane
at a lodging house, his illness develop
ed into influenza. He was taken to
the Sacred Heart hospital, where
pneumonia followed and hq died Jan.
17th. He was buried at Deary, where
he had lived a number of years. .
His mother, Mrs. Anna Weber went
to her home today at Nespelem, Wash,
His uncle, Mason McCoy of Deary, is
still visiting in Moscow.
Death at County Farm.
Died at the county home, January |
21, Wm. Harry Wilson, of cerebral
softening. Mr. Wilson had entered
the home last February from Pot
latch and had been bedfast two
months. He was 47 years of age. He
leaves two small children at Potlatch.
He and his wife were divorced after
he entered the home.
The funeral occured Wednesday, in
terment being made in the Moscow
cemetery.
10
How Have the Mighty Fallen
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CALLED BY DEATH
LONG PERIOD OF SUFFERING
ENDED BY DEATH AT FAMILY
HOME INfMOSCOW
.
The many friends of Jesse W. Ran
dall will be grieved to learn of his
death last evening at 7 o'clock at his
home on East B street.
Mr. Randall had .been ill many years
of rheumatism, being confined to his
bed the last five years. He and his
wife came to thi$ country in 1879
and settled in the ; section known as
Little Potlatch, southeast of Moscow,
where they took up a homestead and
lived for many years, and still have
large land acreage.
They moved to Moscow about 17
years ago when Mr. Randall was no
longer able to farm.
He leaves besides his wife, four
children, Ernest, wpo for a number of
years was in the (auditor's office at
the court house
farm; John, who
id is now on the
Ves on the farm;
Mrs. H. Whaley ofiTacoma and Mrs.
Wendel Pochel of Moscow.
Mr. Randall was 68 years of age at
the time of his d^ath.
The funeral willîtake place tomor
row at Grice's pajlors at 2 o'clock.
Rev. J. Quincy Biggs of the Christian
church will condurc the services.
MAY INVESTIGATE
OTHER DEPARTMENTS
LEGISLATURE PLANS TO INVESTI
GATE GOVERNOR ALEXANDER'S
ADMINISTRATION
for the Investigation of other depart
ments of the last administration, if
this is wanted. The state affairs com
mittee is investigating former Ad
jutant General Moody. The house this
morning provided expense money for
traveling clerks and summoning of
witnesses. Young, republican, of Ada
county, asked the house to summon
Moody and Alexander to make explan
ations. The house passed resolutions
by the senate for |hree members of
the house and two of the senate, to
investigate. The house members are
'Givens and Featherstone, republicans,
and Hoff, democrat. Witty and Nel
son are the senate members.
The Neilson measure, making it a
misdemeanor to draw checks on in
sufficient funds; and the bill abolish
ing capital, punishment in Idaho, were
killed in the committee this morning.
Caribou County Created.
The bill creating Caribou county
passed the house this morning, 48 to
15. The vote followed some sharp de
bate.
The effort of Senator Lee of Bing
ham ocunty, to have the governor's
consolidation bill reconsidered, failed
by _?; vot ^ of , ^ _ ..
, r° tai T club of Bo se asked the
legislature to memorialize congress
t° n ° al l the Panama canal Roosevelt
It seems certain this afternoon that
Former Governor Moses Alevander

will be called before the committee in
vestigatlng the charges against for
m ® r Adjutant General Moody,
Yeaman, head of the state affairs
committee of the senate, said in an
swer to the suggestion of Senator
Thrailkill of Ada, that Governor Alex
ander will be called if his testimony
is needed.
The state affaris committee refused
to recommend the request of Pettibone
that the auditor make a statement to
members of the senate on the liabil
ities and assets of the state for the
last four years. No important bills
were up in the senate today.
100,000 STRIKE IN
BELFAST TIE UP WORK
LONDON.—There are 100,000 peo
ple involved in the Belfast strike.
Twenty-six trades are affected, writes
the Mall's Belfast correspondent, who
says the electric and gas plant work
ers joiaed the shipyard workers in
demanding a 40-hour week.
KEPT WEDDING SEI HET
FOR NEARLY A MONTH
It was just learned today that Dr.
J. J. Herrington and Mrs. Luella Mc-
Kee were quietly married in Moscow
on January 1, at the Baptist parson-
age by the Rev. Dean Hamilton, pas-
tor of that church. Both parties are
well known in Moscow. They kept
their secret well and it was only
learned today that the wedding had
occurred nearly a month ago.
Herrington came here but recently
but he seems to be ''making himself
at home." The happy couple will
make their home in Moscow, where
both have many friends.
-ms-
Dr.
TWO NEW GASES OF
HEALTH OFFICER REPORTS TWO
MILD CASES DEVELOPED IN
TOWN YESTERDAY
We boasted too soon of Moscow be
ing free from influenza, for two new
cases developed yesterday and were
reported to Dr. Adair, city health of
ficer this morning. One case is at
210 S. Asbury street and .the other
is at 518 E. Seventh street. Both
are very mild and are causing no un
easiness.
Dr. Adair says that these cases re
sulted from exposure of the patients
to persons who had come from out
side points, bringing the disease with
them and that the gravest danger of
a renewal of the epidemic here is
from it being brought here from other
points. Moscow is (or was) free from
the disease, but it is bad in other
places, Colfax, Lewiston, Pullman
and other nearby towns have the di
sease in bad form while reports from
Boise are that conditoins there are
very bad. Dr. Adair says that a man
who recently returned from Boise
says that there were 21 bodies in one
undertaking parlor there, awaiting
burial and that there were 480 cases
in Boise . Dr. Adair said:
"The situation over the United
States as per public health service re
port, published weekly, Vol 34, Jan.
11th shows an increase in the follow
ing states: Oregon for Portland, 993
cases, 44 deaths; California, 6,500
total to date, 240,800; Alabama, 1212;
Connecticut, 1,619; Illinois, 3,004;
Iowa, 1,653; Kansas, 4,139; Louisiana,
3,490; Massachusetts, 14,793; Mich
igan, 7,431; New Jersey 3,605; Ver
mont, 1,245 partial; Virginia, 914 for
Bedford county. The following states
also report an increase but no figures
given: Minnesota, Arkansas, Indiana,
New York, N. Carolina and Ohio.
Surgeon General Blue testified to the
fact that influenza is infectious at the
very earliest stage of the attack, and
further states "that it would seem to
be wise to give renewed emphasis to
the importance of going to bed at the
slightest indication of illness."
H BELIEF
QUOTH BOI BHISED
COMMITTEE FINDS IT NECES
SARY TO CONTINUE THE WORK
TO RAISE FUNDS
SPOKANE, WASH.—The Inter
moüntain branch of the American
East, 546 Peyton building, Spokane,
Wash., finds it necessary to continue
the campaign in the interest of the
$30,000,000 fund for Armenians, Syri
ans and Persians and with that In
view is sending word to the county
chairmen to speed up work this week.
C. C. McEachran, chairman for
eastern Washington and northern
Idaho, said: "We are in need of con
siderable money to make our quota
from the entire district although part
of the counties have made up their
quotas. We have more than $60,000
reported of the $108,220 needed.
"This work of relief is vital. Ger
many cannot be absolved from the
responsibility for massacres and de
portations from which these people
have suffered. It was a part of her
plan for world dominion by force and
it is up to us to keep alive the rem
nant who have survived, by helping
to rehabilitate their desolated coun
try."
The New York headquarters has
issued the following statement from
former President William Howard
Taft:
money, whatever is given, will be
properly administered for a people
that need it sorely.''
You can be sure that the
A petition was also filed for letters
of administration to appoint Mrs.
Francisa Ebel as administratrix in the
etate of her son, George R. Ebel, who
recently died of influenza at Geneve.
This estate consists of real and
sonal property.
NEWS OF PROBATE AND
DISTRICT COURTS
A case^qd yesterday in the district
court was'tiiat of L. D. Arnold against
I. B. Ricketts for the collection of a
promissory note of $500.
In the probate court a petition of
letters of administration in the estate
of Chas. Ebel, consisting of personal
property, was filed by the widow of
the deceased, Mrs. Francisa Ebel, ask
ing that she be appointed administrat
rix.
MEN WHO SERVED
EVERY FAMILY SHOULD HAND
IN RECORD OF ITS SOLDIERS
AND SAILORS
That the plan to compile a history
of the young men of Idaho who par
ticipated in the great war was a most
popular movement, has been amply
demonstrated by the eagerness with,
which families all over the state of
Idaho have hastened to fill out the
cards asking for appropriate and nec
essary information about their repre
sentatives in army and navy.
Some weeks ago, Mrs. J. G. Gibson,
chairman of this important committee
for Latah county, distributed among
her precinct captains a slip of paper
bearing some thirty or more queries
relative to the appearance, age, edu
cation, previous occupation, and war
service of the men who had either vol
unteered or who had been drafted.
Mrs. Gibson reports that the precinct
chairmen over the county have done
very well and are pursuing the work.
Some have sent in for additional slips,
with which Mrs. Gibson is well sup
plied.
In Moscow Mrs. Gibson has five
assistants who are looking after dif
ferent sections of the town. If any
one in this city who has a member
of his family in the service, has not
yet received the little slip of queries
upon the answers to which will be
based the war history of Idaho sol
diers and sailors, he is asked to notify
Mrs. Gibson. She will see that every
family is properly supplied with the
blanks and will arrange for receiving
them later.
"Some of the other counties in the
state," said Mrs. "have
more prompt and more energetic than
Latah county, but I do not feel that
we have any cause for discouragement
in the prosecution of the work. Now
that many of the boys are coming
home, it will be all the easier to get
the information from them.
"Attention should be called to the
fact that an error was made on the
slips that are handed out. The third
question should ask for the place of
birth instead of the country of birth.
The state chairman, Mrs. Ridenbaugh,
notified us some weeks ago to have
this mistake rectified.
"A good deal of doubt seemed to
exist as to just what was meant by
limited service, and some other terms.
"Limited service means physically
unfit to fight though able to have
been assigned to some specific duty.
"Unit of service means the regi
ment, battalion, or company.
"Selected service means those in
the draft.
"The state chairman is very anxious
to secure the names of those who
were sent to West Point from Idaho
the past and who served in the
war; of those who enlisted before we
were in the war from anywhere in
the United States or Canada if they
were Idaho citizens; of those who
were in the Second Idaho; of those
who enlisted in other states, if Idaho
was their home, no matter if other
states claim them, Idaho wants their
history; of the S. A. T. C.'s whe went
our universities when the govern
ment called them, if their home was
Idaho.
0
"I am exceedingly anxious that
Latah county should not miss from its
record a single one of the names of
the noble young men who served their
country in any capacity during the
great war. I hope every one who
reads this article will try to recall
the name of some young men who
went into service from this county, no
matter where he lived at the time, and
that there will be an immediate ef
fort to see that his record is included
with those of the boys of whom we
are all so proud.
"It will be a wonderful privilege in
the years to come to sit down with
the war history of Idaho in our hands
and scan the pages for the names
and achievements of the very pick of
Idaho's manhood."
Ra
SECRETARY LANE IS
CONFIDENT OF FUTURE
Says the committee on statistics and
standards of the Chamber of Com
merce of the United States; "There
are all sorts of forecasts as to the na
ture and volume of business during
the next six months. They vary from
a dull winter and a good spring and
summer to no business at all until
a good harvest matures, or to only a
fair business until the reconstruction
process is completed. But this seems
to be the most popular prophecy,
namely, a period of intermediate
length working itself out by common
sense and forethought to a far better
era and greater prosperity than ever
has been our portion in the past."
Says Franklin K. Lane, secretary
of the interior: "The economic and
industrial outlook of the United States
seems to me to be bright. I can give
no reason for this other than a most
superficial one. Europe has been
pretty well smashed up. Restoration
its job. America has the raw ma
terials. This should make things live
ly at mines and mills. Moreover my
recollection of history is that a vic
torious nation always has a period of
good times after war; England in
Elizabeth's time and after Napoleon;
per-(Germany after the war of 1870 are in
stances."

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