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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, February 03, 1919, Image 1

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The Daily Star-Mirror
VOLUME TUI
MOSCOW, LATAH COUNTY. IDAHO MONDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1919
NUMBER 108
STILL FIGHTING IN SIBERIA
WARSAW, Friday.—(By wireless via Vienna to the Associated Press.)—
Kiev has been taken by the Bolsheviki troops. General Petluras' troops have
partially gone over to the enemy.
ARCHANGEL, Sunday.—(By Associated Press.)—Bolsheviki patrols were
in touch with the American patrols today about 15 miles south of Sped
makrenga With the exception of widespread patrol activity and heavy
shelling on Vologda railway lines there was comparative quiet yesterday in
all sectors.
Ukrania to Attack Rumania.
LONDON.—Ukranian troops are preparing to attack Rumania, which is
said to have mobliized forces to meet the assault, according to Copenhagen
advice(S .
*
Allied Commission to Adjust Polish Dispute.
PARIS.—(By Associated Press.)—The allied commission which leaves for
Poland next Saturday to adjust controversies between the Poles and Czecho
slovaks over the Teschen coal fields has been able to make a truce between
' the two nationalities only pending the arrival of the commission and a per
sonal examination of the situation.
FRENCH GIRL WANTS

' LIEUTENANT OTTO 8TILLINGER
WRITES TO PARENTS ABOUT
THE MATTER
■ Chief of Police and Mrs. J. C. Still-
Inger have received a letter from their
son. Lieutenant Otto Stilllnger, who is
with the American army of occupa-
tion, stating that a French girl is very
anxious to come to the United States
and find a home here. She has lost
all of her relatives but her grand-
mother and a sister. There are prob-
ably many homes in Moscow and vi-
cinity which would be glad to give
shelter to a deserving young woman
such as Lieutenant tSillinger de-
scribes and If there be such they
should notify Chief Stlllinger at once
• and the young woman may be brought
. over by Lieutenant tSillinger when he
returns to America, which will prob-
ably be soon. His letter follows:
- Fontaines en Duesmois, France,
t January 11, 1919.
Dearest Mother and Father: Just a
few lines to let you know that I am
well and hope you people are the
SEATTLE STRIKE TO BECOME
SEATTLE STRIKE TO BECOME .
SEATTLE.—Every union in Seattle will walk out on a general strike at
10 o'clock next Thursday forenoon, according to announcement today by the
publicity committee named at yesterday's meeting of the representatives
of 110 unions. The strike is called as a sympathetic movement to help the
striking metal trades workers who left the shipyards recent to press demands
They were getting $6.86 per day and struck for $8 per
If the strike is carried out as planned it will
- for more pay.
day for eight hours works,
close everything in Seattle. Street cars, electric lights, heating plants, fuel
yards, grocery stores, meat markets, bakeries and dairies which employ
union labor will stop and the city will be in darkness without transportation
of any kind.
Swedes Have the Strike Bug Too.
COPENHAGEN.—Serious railway strikes have broken out in Sweden.
Workmen last night stopped work on 19 different lines.
London Tube Closed By Striker^.
LONDON.—Londoners this morning found the entrances to the principal
tube stations closed, owing to the midnight decision of employes not to move
. trains today, unless their demand for a half hour luncheon interval be al
lowed them in the new eight-hour day.
. COUNTY NONET IS
' SCHOOL AND COUNTY MONEY DI
VISIONS BEING ARRANGED—
ASSESSOR RETURNS
• County Superintendent of Schools
Miss Skattaboe is apportioning the
school funds among the 98 different
districts in the county,
of the total county tax for the schools
is $64,970.49 and the amount from the
state $7090.27. This is divided on the
basis of 40 per cent to the number of
teachers, 40 per cent to the number of
pupils and 20 per cent to the needy
districts.
County Treasurer Miss Adair has
divided the taxes for the first half of
1918 as follows:
Current Expense Fund
Road F-und .
Bridge Fund .
Assessor Gemmill has just returned
from Boise from the state meeting of
the county assessors and he report
that practically the same valuation is
given on properties, the same to he
assessed as on the former schedule.
' In the probate court before Judge
Adrian Nelson, the will of Mrs. Mary
Mulalley of Genesee has been proved
and C. F. Burr is appointed executor.
, The estate is valued at about $25,000.
Before the district court the fol
lowing have filed declarations of in
tentions f^r citizenship: On January
* 30, Frank' Schawrek, aged 30 years,
of PotlatcK, a native of Austria; Eric
Lundell. aged 38, of Potlatch, a native
of Sweden £ Charles John Berg, age'd
41, of Potlatch, a native of Finland,
The amount
$34,606.12
13,029.13
8.108.01
same. By the way, I wonder if you
want to raise a very nice French girl.
She sure would be a lot of company
for you people. At the present time
she does not speak very good English
but she is smart and would soon learn.
When I tell you how old she is you
will think she is too old. She is 19
years old and seems like a girl of 14.
She has only a grandmother and an
older sister and the older sister is a
school teacher and is coming to Am
erica very soon to teach school. She
is a farmer girl and I know you would
both like her. She can beat me shoot
ing a 45 revolver and rides a bicycle
like a boy. If she don't get away
from here she is doomed to stay in
this village the rest of her life. She
works very hard here, doing the work'
that men should do. Now don't think
I am joking about this for I am not
and if you know anyone that would
like to take her in their family and
have her taught English tell them to
write me. Her name is Therese Fros
sard. She has already had a good
education in the French schools but
of course it could be Improved upon
In America.
She would be fine on a farm with
some good family but it must be a
good family as I would hate to **e
her mistreated.
Write me a few lines and tell me
what you think about it. I am as ever,
Your loving son,
OTTO.
On January 31, August Engstrom,
aged 36, of Potlatch, a native jof Swed
en; Jacob Kyrola, aged 37, of Pot
On Feb
latch, a native of Finland,
ruary 1, Martin Walstad, aged 31, of
Potlatch, a native of Norway.
WINTS TWO NODE
SUPREME JUOEES
LEGISLATURE PASSES JEROME
COUNTY BILL—COMPENSATION
MEASURE IS UP
BOISE.—Two more supreme court
judges are asked by house bill intro
duced today. That would give Idaho
five members Instead of three as the
court is now constituted. Washington
has nine members of the supreme
court.
The house also asks for the estab
lishment of two tuberculosis hospitals,
one in the north and the other in the
south portion of the state.
The senate will probably amend the
workmen's compensation act to in
clude agricultural pursuit, despite the
protest from farmers from all parts
of the state.
The bill forming Jerome county
passed the house this forenoon,
hill to take agricultural lands out of
municipalities passed the senate.
Indefinite postponement of two of
Senator Borah's measures, the first
that county commissioners be elected
from their own districts and the other
taxing unused electric power was the
fate of the measures today.
The house memorialized congress
today to reclaim 2,000,000 acres of
Idaho land, in record time. The me
morial was passed within a few min
utes after its introduction.
The
44444444444444444
♦ HINES OPPOSED TO
♦ GOVERNMENT OWNERSHIP 4

+
+
♦ WASHINGTON.
Director- +
♦ General Hines, testifying today 4
♦ before the senate interstate com- 4
♦ merce committee, declared he ♦
does not believe in government 4
♦ ownership, but in the organize- 4
♦ tion of a few of the big railroad 4
4 companies suject to close govern- 4
4 ment supervision. "I do not be- 4
4 lieve there is anything substan- 4
4 tial in the argument that five 4
4 year extension of government 4
4 operation would necessarily 4
4 mean government ownership," he 4
4 said.
444444444444444 4 4
4
FRENCH OPPOSES
PUBLIC BUILDINGS
IDAHO CONGRESSMAN GIVES REA
SONS FOR OPPOSITION TO
BUILDING BILL
WASHINGTON. — Congre ssman
French of Idaho is one of the mem
bers who is opposing the passage of
the general public building bill in the
present congress, and has so stated
his position to the chairman of the
public buildings and grounds com
mittee.
Mr. French say sthe secretary of the
treasury and responsible administra
tion officials estimate it will cost $18,
000,000,000 to run the government for
the coming year. The taxes will be
something like $6,000,000,000 and
bonds will need to be sold, in all prob
ability, to realize some $12,000,000,000
more.
He has pointed out that taxes are
unusually heavy and that it is alto
gether unwise to engage in a public
A petition is being prepared here to
send to the Latah and Nez Perce del
egations in the state -legislature ask
ing them to support a measure ap
propriating $5000 to build a strip of
road In the state of Washington. The
road in question is only about half a
mile long but It is an important link
in the "North and South Highway"
it is proposed to build in Idaho and
is an absolute necessity in order to
give a hard-surfaced road from Mos
cow and Genesee to Lewiston.
Although the road is in the state of
Washington it is of no benefit to the
people of that state, except an oc
casional person who might want to
come to Moscow or Genesee from the
immediate vicinity of the strip of road.
The road bed has been graded and is
in condition to receive the hard-sur
face coating but it is, at present,
merely a dirt road.
The strip of road in question lies
between the Idaho-Washington state
line and the Lewiston highway which
is one of the finest pieces of road in
the west. It is necessary to use this
piece of road in order to connect with
this highway as this piece of road runs
around the end of a very deep canyon
which it would be impossible to
bridge.
H. J. Doolittle, consulting engineer
for the Washington state highway
commission, with headquarters at Spo
kane, who Is in charge of the high
way construction work in eastern
Washington, passed through Moscow
last night enroute to Asotin where
he goes to inspect the proposed road
from Asotin to An atone. Mr. Doo
little called the attention of Idaho
people to the need of building this
road and the improbability that Wash
ington would do anything to have it
hard surfaced as the road clearly be
longs to the Idaho road system, al
though it is in Washington. Mr. Doo
little suggested that Idaho take ac
tion on it while the legislature is in
session.
from $4500 to $5000 for hard surfacing
this strip of road which he says is
just half a mile In length.
The matter is to be taken up by
good roads advocates here and an ef
posed Moscow district, will not be
permitted to vote on the proposition.
He estimated the cost at
Conflicting Thoughts
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-fix
building program at this time.
He has pointed out to the commit
tee the most important items -in Ida
ho for consideration if a building pro
gram shall be determined upon and
strongly advises against the whole
program.
Mr. French further states that it
could not be said that it was a means
for furbishing employment for labor
and a place for the sale of materials
at once, for experience tells us it re
quires two or three years after a bill
shall be approved before the building
will actually be begun,
Mr. French feels that the fartherest
the committee should go is toward
providing ways cor carrying forward
buildings already begun, or where
sites have been purchased and no de
lays should occur, or where cases are
most urgent.
pa
MOSCOW PEOPLE SHOULD
HEAR IRVIN S. COBB
Irvin S. Cobb, probably the greatest
American writer of the present day
and an intensely interesting speaker,
is to deliver a lecture at Lewiston
tomorrow (Tuesday) night, and the
lecture should be attended by Moscow
people. Mr. Cobb will tell what he
saw in France, Germany, Belgium,
Turkey, Italy and Austria during the
war and he will tell it in an interest
ing, instructive and entertaining way.
It is said that the trip can be easily
made by car from Moscow, going via
Genesee and down the scenic high
way. Every one who possibly can do
so should attend the lecture for it will
be well worth the trip.
WOMAN SUFFRAGE TO
BE TAKEN UP AGAIN
WASHINGTON.—The managers of
the senate woman suffrage resolution
today decided to call up the measure
next Monday and endeavor to obtain
final vote if possible. The result,
they stated, will he close^
a
fort made to have it completed. Other
wise the road to Lewiston, even though
the plans to hard surface all of that
portion between the state line and
Moscow and Genesee, would be useless
during bad weather as it would be im
possible to get over this section of
dirt road. The plan for Idaho to
complete this piece of road in Wash
ington meets with general favor here.
The chamber of commerce will be ask
ed to take action on it.
District 41 Protests.
A strong protest was made today
by many land owners to the north of
Miscow over what, on Its face, ap
pears to be an unjustice to that sec
tion in the formation of the Moscow
road district. The protest was made
by Al. Presby, George and Lee Chan
ey, Goetz Brothers, Charles Williams,
Charles Summers, George Hare and
others who own land and pay taxes
in road district 41.
The protestants claim that the for
mation of the Moscow road district
takes 70 per cent of the taxable wealth
from district 41 but leaves a large
of the distinct out of the new
area
road district and consequently they
get no benefit from this new road to
be built by the taxpayers of the Mos
cow district.
The protestants claim that they
built and improved the road to Mos
cow at an expense to themselves, with
out any help from Moscow or the
county ,of more than $600. This mon
ey was spent by them last year in
order to get a better road to Moscow,
their trading point. Now the pro
posed road district, they claim, will
take from them more than two-thirds
of their taxable wealth, including the
Spokane & Inland Empire railroad for
a distance of between three and four
miles, and leaves the old road district
in bad shape and with little taxable
property, but a large mileage of roads
to be improved. The protestants ask
that they be included in the Moscow
road district and that all of district
41 be taken in, or that the portion of
the district it is proposed to take
from it and give to Moscow district
he left in district 41. They ask the
cooperation of the Moscow business
men in defeating this proposed new
district in the coming election. The
protestants, being outside of the pro
AMERICAN SOLDIERS KILLED
TROYES, France.—Eight United States soldiers were killed and 30 in
jured when a troops train conveying American soldiers from Chaumont to
Brest collided with two German locomotives at Montieramey station. The
men were enroute to take ship for the United States. The dead and injured
were taken to Bar-Sur-Aube.
Release Soldiers With Dependents.
WASHINGTON.—General Pershing has been authorized by the war de
partment to send home for immediate discharge from the army any drafted
or enlisted man who presents convincing evidence of sickness or other dis
tress in his family.
Greece Still Presenting Claims.
PARIS.—Premier Venizelos, of Greece, before the supreme council of the
peace conference this morning made a statement of the claims of Greece.
He will continue the presentation at tomorrow morning's session. Czecho
slovak delegates will again be heard at tomorrow's session, it
nounced today.
was an
MISS ORR MAKES
MOSCOW WOMAN SAYS SHE DID
NOT KNOW LINDSTROM WAS
MARRIED MAN
An injustice seems to have been
done Miss Edna Orr of Moscow in
the introduction of testimony in the
divorce case of Edward Lindstrom,
formerly of Moscow, at Spokane last
week. An account of the testimony
was published in Saturday's Star
Mirror. In it was reference to cer
Mrs. Lindstrom. These are letters
which Lindstrom is alleged to have
written to Miss Orr and the testimony
showed that they had been "surrend
ered" to Mrs. Lindstrom by "Miss Orr.
The latter states that she knew
nothing of Mr. Lindstrom being a
married man when the first letter was
written. She did not answer that let
ter. After Lindstrom moved to Spo
kane he wrote Miss Orr the second
letter and she having learned that he
was married wrote him telling him
to never write to her again. She says
that Mrs. Lindstrom knew nothing
about the letters until she (Miss Orr)
told Mrs. Llndstrom of -them and gave
them to the wife who used them in
the divorce proceedings at Spokane as
reported in Saturday's Star-Mirror.
The episode occurred between three
and four years ago.
Miss Orr says that Mrs. Lindstrom
came here and when Miss Orr told
the wife of the letters and Mrs. Lind
strom asked Miss Orr to write a let
ter to her attorneys in Spokane and
tell the facts. Miss Orr gave Mrs.
Lindstrom the letters and calls atten
tion to the fact that she would not
have done this had thete been any un
due intimacy between her and Mr.
Lindstrom. Miss Orr naturally regrets
the unpleasant publicity the publica
tion of the evidence introduced in
court brought to her.
r
ABERDEEN ANGUS FROM YAKIMA,
WIN THE CHAMPIONSHIP
PRIZES
CHICAGO.—Special tribute is paid
the coast and northwestern live stock
shows and the progress of the industry
by Secretary Charles Gray of the Am
erican Aberdeen-Angus Breeders' as
sociation in the publication of his an
nual booklet, "Results of Interna
tionals" in which he reviews the not
able war record of the Aberdeen-An
gus cattle. Included in the list of
more than thirty victory points where
the "Doddies" have won inter-breed
steer grand championships are Los
Angeles, Honolulu, Sacramento, Yak
ima, Salem and Portland. Single ani
mal grand championships were won at
the California Liberty Fair and at the
California, Oregon and Washington
State Fairs, while "Uncle Sam" was
mixing it with the Huns. "Best beef
herd" and "Best beef carcass" at the
First Territorial Fair of Hawaii went
to the "Blacks," and grand champion
ship carlot at the recent Pacific In
ternational show was won by the same
color.
It was the steer Black Yak, Dred,
fed and shown by Congdon & Battles,
Yakima, Wash., that won the big
honor at the Liberty Fair, this steer
being originally entered at the Chi
cago International, but was held out
for the coast's new show at Los An
geles in order to show California peo
ple the highest type of beef cattle that
have won 52 grand championships out
of 66 at the International Exposition.
The same firm also won yearling car
lot honors at Portland a few days
afterwards, the gravid championship
going to a load of two-year-old Aber
deen-Angus, the product of the bulls
furnished by the Yakima herd. The
qàX(ot show at Portland last year was
a revelation as to the value of the
pure-bred bulls for producing the best
steers. Washington State University
the 1917 grand championships at
won
both the Oregon and Washington State
Fairs on their spayed heifer.
So impressed with the Pacific coast
and northwest was the national as
sociation that much greater support
of the shows is planned for the fu
ture.
44444444444444444
4 FOOD ADMINISTRATION
HELPED THE BEEF TRUST ♦
4
I +
+

4
WASHINGTON.— Edward ♦
I * Lassater, member of the execu- ♦
j 4 five committee of the national ♦
4 livestock association, formerly ♦
+ connected with the food adminia- ♦
+ tration meat division, asserted ♦
4 before the house interstate com- ♦
4 merce committee today that the ♦
♦ food administration and depart- ♦
4 ment of agriculture aided the ♦
4 five leading meat packers in ob- ♦
+ taining mopolistic control of the ♦
4 meat industry.
44444444444444444
4
WILL GET OLD JOBS
ARRANGEMENTS MADE IN NEIGH-
BORING STATE TO CARE FOR
HER SOLDIERS
SEATTLE.—State of Washington
in the northwest fighting division, the
91st who will shortly be returning
from overseas will be greeted on land
ing at New York with the information
that a job is waiting for them in their
home community if the plans outlined
by Lawrence Wood, federal director
of the U. S. Employment Service for
this state, materialize. On learning
that the 91st Division was slated for
an early return Director Wood im
mediately started utilizing the U. S.
Employment SR-vice organization in
the state for the purpose of listing
jobs for men in this division. With
ten regular U. S. Employment Service
offices established in the state and
wfith approximately forty volunteer
offices established for the purpose of
assisting discharged soldiers and
sailors to find employment, the cam
paign was launched. "All that remains
to make it successful," Mr. Wood said,
"is the cooperation of the employers
of the state jyho have jobs waiting for
the men of the 91st."
While the U. S. Employment Serv
ice immediately took up the task of
finding employment for returning sol
diers and sailors upon the signing of
the armistice and has to date placed
a total of 3391 discharged military
men in employment since November
11, the obligation that the country
owes to the men of the 91st who have
shed their blood on the fields of Fland
ers and offered their lives in their
country's service, extends even furth
er than that owed to the men who did
not get further than training camps
or who gave their services in spruce
production work. The campaign for
the 91st Di vision men will he carried
on in addition to the work of finding
jobs for soldiers and sailors being re
leased daily and is a separate and dis
tinct effort. Employers are being ask
ed to list jobs specifically for men
of the 91st Division and when such
a position is listed it is with the un
derstanding that it will he held open
until a 91st man is available to fill it.
"It is particularly desired," Mr.
Wood said, "to list formere positions
held by thees overseas boys; the pur
pose being to greet the boys when
they dock at New York, with the in
formation that the people at home
to show
their gratitude by finding suitable em
ployment for them."
This information will he extended
to the boys of the 91st Division on
their arrival by the state of Wash
ington's reception committee and by
the officials of the bureau for return
ing soldiers and sailors of the U. S.
Employment Service at New York .
City.
Already one unit, of the 91st Divis
ion has returned from overseas serv
ice, this is the 346th Field Artillery
which recently arrived at Camp Lewis
and which will be mustered out soon.
"An effort to secure jobs for these
men is now being made and every em
ployer who contemplates hiring re
turned soldiers or sailors is urged,"
Mr. Wood said, "to place his order
with the nearest office of the U. S.
Employment
whether or not a 91st man is wanted."
The federal directors of the U. S.
Employment Service in the states of
Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming
and California have been notified of
the campaign inaugurated in the
state of Washington and it is expected
that similar campaigns will be in
augurated in these various states with
the same purpose in view.
specifying
Service,
/
/

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