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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, February 04, 1919, Image 1

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The Daily Star-Mirror
X
TOLUME VIII
MOSCOW, LATAH COUNTY. IDAHO TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 1919
NUMBER 109
WILL PROBE GREECE'S CLAIMS
COPENHAGEN.—A majority of the government buildings in Koenigsburg,
in East Prussia, have been seized by Spartacans from Berlin. The governor
of East Prussia has declared a state of seige in the Thorn district and has
instituted court martial.
Will Investigate Venizelos' Charges.
PARIS.—The supreme council at its meeting today agreed that the ques
tions in the statement of Premier Venizelos, of Greece, concerning Greek
territorial interests in the peace settlement should be referred to a com
mission of experts whose duty it will be to make recommendations for a
just settlement.
Bolsheviki Wants Representation.
PARIS.—The Russian Soviet government will "take all measures" to
bring about an agreement with the entente, according to a wireless message
from Moscow sent Sunday. The message complains that the Bolshevik
authorities received no formal invitation to attend the Princes Island con
ference.
p
This is Wilson's Busy Day.
PARIS.—(By Associated Press.)—President Wilson has several appoint
ments for today, including calls from representatives of the Bible Society,
and visits from the republican congress who have arrived in Paris. He is
determined, however, that nothing shall be permitted to obstruct the progress
of the commission for the creation of the league of nations, of which he is
chairman.
A
NEW PRIMARY LAW
BELIEVED
OUTLINE OF MEASURE THOUGHT
TO BE FAVORED BY BOTH
POLITICAL PARTIES
BOISE.—As recently forecasted in
this correspondence Idaho is in line
for a direct primary law. It will not
disturb the fundamental principle of
popular action but will simplify the
procedure and, it is believed, result in
satisfactory selection of candi
more
dates and in less expense.
The new measure has general ap
proval of republicans and democrats
alike, it being recognised, they de
clare that there is a popular feeling
that the present primary is unwieldly
and totally unsatisfactory and that
the public demands a change.
The proposed law provides for coun
ty primaries at which county tickets
will be named by the various parties.
At the same time delegates will be
named to county conventions of the
parties that will name delegates to
the state conventions.
Each party acts independently and
has its own organization, and a party
ie designated as an organization hav
ing cast at the preceding elections for
one of its candidates 10 per cent of
vote cast for all the candi
dates for that particular office. An
-affiliation of voters to the number of
five per cent of the total vote cast at
the preceding general election also
gives party standing.
Independent tickets may be named
by petition, 3000 bona fide being re
quired for state or federal positions,
900 for district, 300 for county and 30
for precinct.
Provisions being made for paying
actual expenses of delegates to state
convention. This provision is made
so no delegate need be under obliga
tions to any interest or candidate and
so that no desirable man can refuse
to go as a delegate because of his
inability to pay the expenses of the
trip to the state convention of his
party.
P-u
TELEPHONE SHIED
STRINGING NEW
PLAN FOR
CABLE TO CITY LIMIT IS BE
ING WORKED OUT
The Moscow Telephone & Telegraph
. company is planning to spend between
$6,000 and $6,000 in improvements
of its system in Moscow this spring.
Work will begin just as soon as
weather conditions are favorable. The
" improvements will furnish employ
ment to a
A. T. West, owner of the system,
same down from Spokane last night,
making the trip in his Dodge car and
says the roads, while rough in some
places, are remarkably good for this
season of the year. Mr. West is in
specting the local system and the toll
lines and making estimates of the
cost of the proposed improvements.
These consist of a new cable to run
out Van Buren street, connecting at
the city limits. Two new leads will
be constructed to the University of
Idaho and other improvements in the
system will be made.
It is expected that the hearing
the application of this company for
permission to increase the rates
charged on the rural lines from 25
- to 60 cents per month will come up
before the public untilities commission
' soon. The company claims that it is
unfair to the people of Moscow who
pay from $1.26 to $2 per month for
telephone service to continue the rate
of 26 cents a month of rural tele
phones when the work of connecting
with these lines with their various
"long and short rings" is much great
' er than that of connecting the city
telephones and that a telephone is
really of greater benefit to a farmer
living several miles from town, than
£0 the resident of a town or city.
on
A. J. GEHRETT TAKEN
BY DEATH THIS MORNING
r-—- .JüiT
A. J. Gehrett, after an Illness of
four months, died this morning at
9:15 at his home on North Asbury.
Mr. Gehrett had lived in Idaho over
14 years, having moved here from
Kansas. He farmed eight miles north
east of Troy until he moved to Mos
cow two years ago.
Mr. Gehrett was past 68 years of
age at the time of his death,
leaves besides his wife, six children:
Clyde Gehrett of Oklahoma, Mrs.
Frank Crane of Pittsburgh, Kansas,
Mrs. Sam Frei of Bovill, Tolbert Geh
rett, north of Moscow, Mrs. Floyd
Holstine of Troy and Miss Rllla of
Moscow.
The time of the funeral has not yet
been announced as Mr. Gehrett's
brothers in Indiana have not been
beard from.
He
BASKET BALL GAME
OREGON AGRICULTURAL COL
LEGE AND UNIVERSITY MEET
FOE GOOD CONTEST
The Oregon Agricultural College
basket ball five will arrive in Mos
cow tomorrow afternoon to meet Ida
ho in what will be one of the most in
teresting games of the early season.
W. S. C. on a trip to the coast last
week defeated the Oregon Aggies on
their own floor.
Oregon comes to Moscow with a
strong team which the W. S. C. play
ers have said is one of the coming
teams of the conference this season.
To win from O. A. C. Wednesday and
Thursday evenings means that the
Idaho aggregation will still hold a
record with no defeats, but to win
with a good margin means that our
university has the edge on the Wash
ington State Agricultural College.
Although somewhat weakened by
the fact that Captain Howard Camp
bell Is bothered with an injured
shoulder the Idaho boys are hard to
get around this season. The scoring
trio, Moe, Hunter and Campbell, of
the team is the one factor that makes
victory seem likely. However, the
defensive playing of Lindley, Roraig
and Brigham measures that the vis
itors must bring no "dark horses"
along if they are to run up a lead in
the scoring.
Coach Bleamaster of the university
gave his men a light practice Monday
afternoon, resting them from the hard
trip which they just took to Walla
Walla, Wash., where they defeated
Whitman college two games. This
afternoon the practice will consist of a
short but snappy practice game with
the second team.
The games to be played Wednes
day and Thursday are called for 7:45
p. m. and will be played at the uni
versity gymnasium.
IRVIN S. COBB PASSED
THROUGH MOSCOW TODAY
Irvin S. Cobb passed through Mos
cow today on the 12:22 passenger
train on the Northern Pacific. He
was seated in the day coach and when
the incoming crowd approached the
end of the car he began to gather up
his belongings to hospitably share the
chairs.
He is a rotund medium sized man,
of course, not so large as the cartoons
portray him. He is of neither the
blond or brunette complexion, but
just the between type, with gray
eyes.
A reporter of the Lewiston Tribune
stepped up to him inquiring, "Is this
Mr. Cobb?" He calmly and without
a smile said, "No," but was no doubt
chuckling to himself as the reporter
turned away disappointed. But when
a Moscow woman said she was going
to Lewiston to hear Mr. Cobb, the
remark was made that "He'd be the
life of the party." At this reference
to his latest story, Mr. Cobb's eyes
twinkled and the great writer's ident
ity was known.
♦♦♦♦+♦+♦++++♦++♦+
+ PRESIDENT WINS IN BIG
♦ NAVAL BUILDING PROGRAM *
+
+
+
♦ WASHINGTON. — Insistence ♦
♦ by President Wilson upon the ad- +
+ ministration policy of naval ex- ♦
+ pansion led to the unanimous ap- ♦
♦ proval given by the house naval ♦
♦ committee to another three years ♦
♦ construction program. This was +
♦ disclosed today by Chairman 4*
♦ Padgett, of the committee when +
+ the house began consideration of ♦
♦ the $750,000,000 annual naval ap- ♦

♦ propriation bill.
AS.
COMMON SENSE IS
ASKED BY FRENCH
IDAHO CONGRESSMAN WANTS
RED TAPE CUT AND JUSTICE
DONE COMMON PEOPLE
WASHINGTON. — Congressman
French spoke for 15 minutes in the
house of representatives urging the
passage of legislation that will pro
vide that small claims arising against
the government- through the different
executive departments be disposed of
and adjudicated by the cabinet offic
ers presiding over the several de
partments.
He pointed out a star route mailj
carrier in Idaho who has waited ten
years for his pay—the department
wanting to pay him but being unable
to under the general law because of
a flaw in his bond.
He pointed out the case of a home
steader on the Nez Perce reservation
who was given a patent to land that
had been patented to an Indian 20
years before, being told to move off
after he had spent several thousands
of dollars in improvements, had re
duced the homestead to a beautiful,
cultivated farm with fences, orchards,
dwelling house and farm buildings,
and without being aware from any
public records that the land was not
available for homestead entry until
after patent had been Issued.
Mr. French says it makes for Bol
shevikism to permit such outrages un
der the government against indi
viduals and there ought to be a speedy
way provided for the settlement of
such claims.
He related how the present congress
has been unable to consider these
claims because of important war busi
ness and that, after all, it is unreason
able that congress should assume to
handle cases that are of such char
acter that the heads of departments
should decide them on their own re
sponsibility.
Mr. French has introduced a bill
providing for the settlement of such
claims by the heads of the several de
partments and urges its passage for
the following reasons:
1st. It would mean early settlement
SEATTLE GENERAL STRIKE
/
SEATTLE.—Union labor leaders today continued their plans for a general
sympathetic walk-out of all the Seattle members at 10 a. m. Thursday.
People in Seattle generally seem to have abandoned all hope of a peaceful
settlement of the strike dmands. Between 40,000 and 50,000 men and women
will strike Thursday, union labor leaders asserted today, in addition to the
35,000 iron workers and ship builders who have been on strike since January
21.
Light and Water Plants to Operate.
SEATTLE.—Mayor Ole Hanson today declared that the city will operate
the light and water plants, owned by the city. If the employes strike others
will be employed, he said. Seattle also owns a part of the street car system
and recently bought the remaining lines for $16,000,000.
Bolshevism Reaches Chile.
BUENOS AIRES, Monday.—Dispatches from Chile report an alarming
situation at Antofagasta, where it is said the disorders have taken a de
cidedly bolshevist turn. It is said that agitators are demanding the estab
lishmen of a new government. The police are said to have captured docu
ments showing a large list of business houses that are to be sacked and
destroyed by the mob.
Senate to Investigate Propaganda.
WASHINGTON.—After extended and vigorous criticism by several sen
ators of the alleged lawless propaganda, the senate today adopted a resolu
tion extending powers to the senate committee investigating German propa
ganda to inquire into other activities which it is charged sought to over
throw the government.
JO
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or adjustment of claims. The govern
ment owes this to the people.
2d. The claim would be settled by
the department under which It arose
and where all fadts are known.
. „ , ,, , . , ..
| P° rtant national legislation.
4th. It would mean an orderly way
of disposing of claims.
3d. A claim that could be settled
by the head of a department in one
hour with all the facts before him
should be so settled, and not be crowd
ed upon congress where more than
five hundred men are asked to con
sidèr it and thereby push aside im
6th.
It would prevent worthless
clajnis from being hastily acted upon
fayprably in the closing days of con
gress and as riders upon important
hi
Mr. Freuen pointed out that years
ago it is understood one claim was
passed by congress three times—a
thing that he says could never occur
if the matter had been disposed of in
the department where the claim
arose.
Congressman French presented to
the house today memorial from the
legislature of the state of Idaho on
the life and character of Colonel
Theodore Roosevelt.
Also a memorial from the legisla
ture of the state of Idaho recommend
mending the passage of laws extending
further federal aid to post roads in
sparsely settled states.
NINE TRANSPORTS BRING

+
MANY AMERICAN SOLDIERS
WASHINGTON. — The departure
from France of nine ships which will
dock at New York, Philadelphia and
Newport News within the next three
weeks, with approximately 400 officers
and 7200 men of the American army,
was announced by the war department
today."
Communication Held Up.
This paper is in receipt of a com
munication signed "A Subscriber." It
cannot be published until the writ
er's identity is know. It is an infall
able rule of all newspapers to pub
lish no communication received an
onymously. The rules of this paper
are that all communications must be
signed by the writer. There is noth
ing in the communication of which the
writer need feel ashamed. The com
munication is held in the editorial
room and if the writer will come in
and sign it the article wll be pub
lished..
♦♦♦♦♦+♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
♦ CONGRESS AWARDS
MANY HONOR MEDALS ♦
+
♦ ■ WASHINGTON.—The award ♦
♦ of congressional medals of honor, ♦
♦ the highest military decorations ♦
♦ to two officers and 19 enlisted +
♦ men of the army in France, was ♦
♦ announced today by the war de- ♦
♦ partaient. Only three medals had ♦
♦ been awarded previously for +
♦ service in the great war. ♦
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦++♦♦
MOSCOW MAY INSTALL ITS
OWN ELECTRIC LIGRT PLANT
110»« IS FREE
QUARANTINE RAISED IX LAST
TWO CASES AND GENERAL BAN
WILL BE LIFTED
Moscow has not a single case of
influenza today. Dr. W. A. Adair, city
health officer, reports the quarantine
raised in the last two cases and that,
so far as the health officer knows,
there is not a case of the disease in
town. Dr. Adair fears that the dis
ease may be brought here from other
places if the town is thrown "wide
open" and requests that visitors from
outside towns, be requested to have
health certificates if they come here
to attend any public entertainment.
Dr. Adair said:
"Moscow is now free from influ
enza, the last quarantine card was
taken down a day or tvvQ ago. The last
four cases were brought here by peo
ple contracting the disease while out
of town. In view of this fact and
the danger of having visitors from
other cities, it will be advisable for
those wishing to Invite outsiders to
dances to be given in Moscow, to ask
their guests to secure a health certif
icate dated the day they arrive, or
the day of entertainment."
I. W. W. THREATENS
A MOSCOW CITIZEN
HARRY STERN WARNED TO LEAVE
THE EARTH BEFORE THE
"TIME" COMES
A letter characteristically I. W. W.
and bolshevik, written, it is believed
by a member of the 1. W. W. who
are regarded as worse than "cooties"
in Latah county, has been received
by H. H. Stern, local plasterer and
member of the American Federation
of Labor who has been talking of try
ing to organize a branch of the order
jj ere
Stern was employed as a special
deputy sheriff here last spring when
the I. W. W. threatened to raid Mos
cow and secure the release of three
of their number who were tried for
criminal syndicalism. In this he in
curred the enmity of the I. W. W.
and the letter of warninsr «ent to him
refers to him "welrinaf tin star a£d
herrtW fofw 1 s Jlmin ,
Uomi n ! .. fe i 0W W °l kme l . lk !
dumb brutes and warns him to get
out of ti e way when the time comes."
of 6 18 ° fa off-and give the job
of organizing the workingmen to a
real man who can hold them when
the üme comes. Mr. Stern is warn
edto get out of the way and you bet-I
ter be getting for the time , is at
hand." The letter<4s signed A TIME
KEEPER." It is written with a type
writer and was mailed at Moscow.
The letter is to be the subject of an
investigation. The postal authorities
will be asked to take the matter up
and the county council of defense and
the Latah County Protective associa
tion is also to investigate. Mr. Stern
has a strong suspicion as to the
author of the letter and will submit
his evidence to these organizations.
The Latah County Protective as
sociation is still in force and has a
strong organization composed of farm
ers, business and professional men
and property owners of Moscow and
Latah county. The organization was
formed for the purpose of dealing with
the I. W. W. when that organization
was strong in this county. It rounded
up about GO of the leaders, held them !
in stockade here for weeks and several
of them were finally brought to trial !
for criminal syndicalism and given
long terms in the penitentiary,
When the trial of these was to have
been held last spring the I. W. W.
threatened to come to Moscow in
force and posted circulars calling up
on 2000 members to come to Moscow i
for the trials. The Latah County Pro- !
tective association was reorganized
and had arrangements all completed
to handle any invasion by the I. W. W.
but no invasion was made. The or
ganization is secret and has signals
and a complete working program. It
will be asked to take up the investiga
tion as rumors have been circulated
here to the effect that the I. W. W.
are planning an outbreak and the
"Time" refers to the date for this out
break. The association will be ready
to meet any demonstration by the
I. W. W. *
*
Verbal Contracts Validated.
WASHINGTON.—In a partial agree
ment reached today by the senate and
house conferees on legislation for the
validation and settlement of informal
war contracts aggregating $2,750,000,-1
000 the senate managers yielded and
struck from the bill their plan for an
apellate commission to pass upon
the awards of government officials,
m.
Telephone Meeting Called.
A telephone meeting for all repre
sentatives of the rural party lines
are hereby notified that a meeting of
said representatives is called for
Friday, February 7, at 1 o'clock
p. m., at the Farmers Union Hall. A
full attendance is desired.
GEO. SIEVERS.
|
Application by the Washington
Water Power company, of Spokane,
to raise rates on certain lines in Mos
cow has been filed with the public
utilities commission and will become
effective on February 20, unless pro
tested by the City of Moscow. The
protest will be njade. The question
came up at last night's session of the
city council when M. C. Osborn, com
mercial agent for the Washington
Water Power company met with the
city council to discuss the proposed
increase in the rate charged for pump
ing and power in Moscow.
The city has a contract with the
Washington Water Power company
for city lights. It is now getting 171
street lights of 100 candle power for
$2.26 per month and the contract for
these does not expire until December,
1920. But there is no contract for
power for the pumping station. The
records show that in 1914 a verbal
agreement was made whereby Mos
cow was granted the same rate as
per
—for the pumping plant. The rate
had been three cents per kilowat hour.
The proposal now is to raise it to two
cents, which would be an increase of
100 per cent.
The city may decide to install an
electric light plant of its own and a
committee consisting of Councilmen
Nisbet and Richardson was appointed
last night to take the matter up and
ascertain the probable cost and prob
able income of such a plant. Mr. Nis
bet said that the city is now paying
about $1700 per year for pumping
power and the proposed increase
would make this about $3200 per year.
Warren Truitt, mayor of Moscow,
stated that the city will protest the
proposed increase in rates and that
City Attorney George G. Pickett has
been instructed to prepare the pro
test which will be filed with the public
utilities commission. The filing of
the protest will automatically stop
the proposed increase which would
otherwise go into effect on February
20, and will call for a hearing, when
evidence will be submitted by both
sides and the commission will accept
or reject the application upon the evi
dence shown. i
V
,, _ _ , . , . .
Çf^orn, commercial agent for
bae Washington Water Power com
pany, said: Our company submitted
a statement of the proposed schedule
before the. public untilities commis
| 10 " at Bo^e, which will become ef
v° n .February 20, unless pro
tested by the. city of Moscow, pie
P™P? s f d . residential and cooking
schedul ® , ls , f. practical reduction. The
commercial lighting rate ts unchanged
and both rates are the same st y !e of
rates in force in all towns in the state
Of Washington, but Moscow gets a
j t / th ^ n many Washington
towns> the maximum being 11 cents
kilowat hour in Mascow as against
fg in Pul i man and Co flax. This power
ra ^ e j s a | so a reduc tion of our present
schedule . The pr0 p 0 sed schedule 23
is a decided redu ction as compared
w j t b sc h e dule G, now in force,
. , ,
Certain power consumers who have
eiij°yed a rate made to them by the
J ate 'J- Shields, foimer owner of
tb ® Pl ant which were \ery discnm
inat0,- y and unprofitable to the rom
l ,an y> be asked t0 paj : a blgber
F at ®- Since the \\ ashington W ater
Water p ° wer con ? paa f, to ° k the . I>rop '
«Jf.®n January 1. 1913 the minimum
bl1 ' J® 8 been . reduced from $1.a to $1
and themax.mum kilowat hour charge
from . 15 , t0 12%.cents. The rate for
municipal pumping was reduced ap
Pfoximately uO pei S® 1 ,.,..® ® "
pan Y 15 " ow ask '" K the lo ut r 1 j
nl,ssloa to the sa ™ e t ™n
Çow charged for municipal pumping
ln otb ® r towns e ®
g ™ n ' edby J£®, ™fnr S niï
Pub 1C Sei ice co » - , . thi
towns ser Y® d ' n , . . g . ». Y
™ m P'W, there being about 3° towns
" number and hearings weie held in
aH and the rates asked for were
granted.
"Every rate in the proposed sched
u l® ' s a reduction from that charged
hi all other places, but some special
rates granted by the late M. J. Shields
f° r Power which had never been dis
turbed are corrected in the new rate
asked for.
Mr. Osborn gave some interesting
figures on the amoount of business
done, capital invested and returns re
ceived from the Moscow plant of his
company. He claims the investment
here is approximately $450,000 and
that in 1917 the company delivered to
the substation here 1,946,800 kilowat
hours of electric power upon which
the revenue was $52,825. This yield
ed the company an average of .0272
per kilowat hour with a maximum
demand of 769 horse power which gave
the company a revenue of $30.20 per
horse power per annum,
lowest rate per horse power given
to any town in the Palouse country
and is occasioned by the large amount
"This is the
of power used in the flour mill here,
Investigations show that the more
power used means a lower rate per -
horse power on the average."
Mr. Pickett, city attorney, began
today the preparation of the answer
and protest against the proposed rate
which will be filed with the public
utilities commission. Mr. Osborn left
today for Pullman for a consultation
with the company's local manager
there and will go to Spokane this
evening. The date of the hearing and
place of holding it will be announced
by the commission later. It will prob
ably be held in Moscow.

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