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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, February 25, 1919, Image 1

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The Daily Star-Mirror
VOLUME VIII
MOSCOW. LATAH COUNTY, IDAHO TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1919
NUMBER 127
SPARTAGANS ELECTION STOP
BOHEMIA HAS CIVIL WARFARE
d—kwM.wbanETA
Turmoil continues in Europe. Several disputes are in a fair way to be
settled amicably and war breaks out in other places. The Poles and Ukran
ians have signed an armistice and stopped fighting Monday, but civil war
has broken out in Bohemia where severe fighting is going on. The "Chris
tian Socialists" (if there can be such a combination)- of Austria are asking
to be reunited with Germany and to have the capital moved to a central
point. Demonstrations in favor of this peaceful move are' being held. At
the same time the Spartacans have broken out afresh and have prevented
municipal elections in Dusseldorf. Premier Clemenceau continues to im
prove. The cable news received today follows:
Severe Fighting in Prague.
AMSTERDAM.—Severe fighting took place all day Saturday in Prague,
the capital of Bohemia, in which the national guard and students drove anti
government communists from public buildings which they had occupied,
according to the Berlin Lokal Anzeiger.
Poles and Ukranians Sign Armistice.
WARSAW.—(By Associated Press.)—The Polish foreign office has re
ceived a telegram from Lemberg saying an agreement was reached there
Sunday for the cessation of hostilities between the Poles and the Ukranians,
beginning at 6 a. m. Monday. The agreement can be renounced by either
party with 12 hours notice.
«
to.
Eisner's Successor is Selected.
COPENHAGEN.— Herr Scheid has been named Bavarian premier in suc
cession of Kurt Eisner, who was assassinated last week. Herr Segits, a
majority socialist, has been appointed Bavarian minister of the interior, to
succeed Herr Auer, who was shot and killed at Munich, according to dis
patches to The Politiken.
i\
Christian Socialists Want to Join Germany.
BASEL, Monday.—The Christian Socialists of German Austria, have
agreed to a union of their part of former Austrian Empire with Germany
on condition that the capitala of the united countries be in central Germany,
according to a Vienna dispatch. Intense demonstrations in favor of the
union with Germany were held in Vienna today. ,
Spartacans Stop Elections.
BERLIN, Monday.—Spartacan forces have prevented municipal elections
in Dusseldorf and lively fighting is reported from some precincts.
_ Clemenceau Still Improving.
PARIS.—Premier Clemenceau's progress toward recovery is such that he
Latest reports indicate that he will soon
(
is now classed as convalescent.
return to his work.
HEAVY SNOW FOIL
UNPRECEDENTED
TOTAL DEPTH OF SNOW REACH
ES TWO FEET IN PLACES—
NO SNOW AT SPOKANE
Still the snow continues to fall, de
spite the fact that previous records
for snow fall at this time of year
have been broken. It is said by old
timers that they have never seen as
much snow fall in the same length of
time at this season of the year as has
fallen since Sunday morning, and ' the
end is not yet." - Almost a foot of
snow fell between 6 a. m, and 5 p. m.
Sunday. Then it turned suddenly
*
cold and cleared up and the bottom
dropped out of the thermometer.
Monday it snowed some more and
about four inches fell Monday night
and Tuesday more snow fell. In the
fields it is said there are two feet of
snow where it has not drifted, and
where the wind has had a good sweep
at some of the hills the snow has
reached a depth of 10 feet on the
north slopes and in coves.
•The heavy snow seems to have been
Moscow people who visited
■■■■■■
Spokane Monday said there was
snow on the streets there and but
very little in the surrounding country.
At Rosalia there were a few inches
of snow but from there north the cov
ering of snow grew steadily lighter.
Colfax reported six inches of snow
yesterday. The Big Bend country re
ported from one to three inches. It
is said there is little snow in the
vicinity of Lewiston and Clarkston
and even on the hills above those
places there is very little snow. In
the Okanogan country in Washing
ton, there were 18 inches of snow
Monday and on Monday morning the
temperature dropped to 13 degrees
below zero.
Latah county seems to lead all
points in the Inland Empire, outside
of the .mountain districts in the
amount of snow fall. The snow will
be of' inestimable benefit to the win
ter wheat and to the spring crops, for
it insureSI moisture to make a good
crop. There is no frost in the ground
under the snow which means that
when it melts most of the moisture
will be absorbed by the soil.
Some fear a flood when the snow
goes off, especially if it goes off with
a rain as it did on March 1, 1910,
when the big flood destroyed portions
of Pullman and Colfax. There is
little danger of this with no frost in
the ground, for the soil will take
much of the water. Nine years ago
• the ground yas frozen hard under the
heavy snow , and the water from the
melting snow had to run off in the
«reeks and canyons, which caused the
big flood,
no
BUILD LOG HOUSES
FOR ANDREW CARNEGIE
' New -England lumberjacks who
" -went into the ,highlands of Scotland
? getting out timber for the British
government, constructed eleven log
huts on Andrew Carnegie's skibo es
tate. These 'hey turned over to the
*V; M. C. A. The huts were equipped
, and the "Y" put on entertainments,
vaudeville and musical comedies. It
the method pursued to keep the
contented, according to A. M.
Y" man
y
•v
was
. • men
Thompson, of Pittsburg, a
who has just returned to America.
• A& a result Mr. Carnegie has a com
plete set of hunting lodges and can
.even go into the hotel business using
. the plants the men built for the "Y".
DR. GOLDER TO SPEAK
AT ASSEMBLY TOMORROW
A rare treat is in store for the stu
dents and others who attend assem
bly at the University of Idaho tomor
row. Dr. F. A. Golder of the history
department of W. S, C., at Pullman,
will speak to the assembly on "Nation
alism and Internationalism." Dr. Gold
er is a good speaker and has had
wonderful experiences - ffe spent
much time in Russia and was there
when the war broke out. His talk will
be of exceeding interest and those
who can hear him will indeed be for
tunate.
NEWS OF DISTRICT
AND PROBATE COURTS
MANT MATTERS OF INTEREST IN
BOTH DIVISIONS AT COUNTY
COURT HOUSE
In the probate court Judge Nelson
appointed Julia R. Brocke as adminis
tratrix of the estate of her deceased
husband, Frank N. Brocke, who suc
cumbed to influenza. The real estate
consists of an 80-acre farm near Ken
drick.
Sarah A. Draper has petitioned the
probate court to appoint John Nisbet
as administrator of the estate of Wm.
R. Draper, deceased, who lived near
Garfield and owned real estate in La
tah county valued at $7500.
In the district court a case has been
filed by Washburn & Wilson against
the Garfield Fruit and Produce com
pany, wherein the plaintiff alleges
having sold the defendant a car load
of potatoes f. o. b. Rubens, Idaho çf
the value of $919.36, in which judg
ment to that amount is asked by the
plaintiff.
A suit for divroce is filed in dis
trict court by Leta Pearl Stall, plain
tiff, against Cleve Stall, defendant.
They were married in Garfield in
1912 and have one minor child, a
son, five years of age for whom the
mother asks the care,
plaint given is cruel treatment and
non-support.
A. W. Bowles and company has
filed action in the district court
against John R. Lynch, alleging there
is due from the defendant on account
$191.60, and asks judgment for said
amount.
The com
ITALIANS DECORATE
Y. M. C. A. WORKERS
Twenty-three Americans who were
with the Italian army during the
memorable offensive in the Monte
Grappa sector, from October 24 to
November 3, have received the deco
ration of the Italian War cross.
The group comprised the entire Y.
M. C. A. staff attached with the
Fourth Italian Army. They were
posted at a field dressing station and
were under almost constant shell fire
during this period. It is said to be
the largest company of civilians deco-
rated at a single time in the war.
-to
Evangelist is Here.
M. Alvah Long, well known evan
gelist, is in Moscow and will speak
each evening at the church of the
Brethren, 317 East First Street.
Services begin at 7:30 sharp, every
evening. The public is invited to at
tend these meetings. Evangelist Long
a powerful and interesting speaker
and brings a message to the people of
Moscow.
* NORTH POLE SEEKß
HAVE "SAFELY L

RS
•E
ANDED"*

+ NEW YORK.—Advices receiv
+ ed here from Alaska state that +
♦ Storker Storkerson and five ex- 4 1
♦ plorers who boarded a floating +
♦ ice pack In the Polar basin last ♦
♦ May in an effort to cross the ♦
+ north pole, "landed safely" in +
+ November. No details of where *
♦ they landed or what they discov- +
+ ered are given.
♦ + t + + + + 4 + t
+
TO PULLMAN MONDAY
STATE COLLEGE TEAM DEFEAT
ED IDAHO IN SECOND HALF
OF FIERCE CONTEST
Idaho lost to W. S. C. at Pullman
Monday night in the second of the
four game series to be played be
tween the rival schools. A special
train from Moscow carried 260 rooters
from here and those backed the play
ers with all the power of the many
lungs. The report of the game as
given by a reported at Pullman, fol
lows :
PULLMAN. — Washington State's
guards broke up the Campbell-Moe
Hunter scoring combination in the
second half of last night's game and
Bohler's men piled up a 31 to 26 vic
tory over Idaho after being apparent
ly beaten in the first half. Much
credit for the sensational victory goes
to Kotula, W. S. C.'s running guard,
who held the redoubtable Moe to two
field baskets and tossed twice that
many himself.
Burgess also played a stellar game
at the guard position, covering Hun
ter every moment and forcing him to
long, difficult shots. Idaho took the
lead early, the first half, closing 18
to 13 in her favor. Rockey and Kotula
located the basket at the outset of
the second half, however, and the
game stood 23 all with only five
minutes to play.
„ With victory in sight Washington
State's men played Idaho off her feet,
grabbing three field baskets and two
free throws while the big crowd that
jammed the gymnasium went wild
with delight. In the closing minutes
of play Idaho was palpably excited,
her forwards shooting wild on com
paratively easy chances. Washing
ton State showed better teamwork
and better fight than in any previous
game on the local floor. Two hun
dred and fifty Idaho rooters came
over by special train and the rooting
was deafening.
The lineups and summary:
W. S. C. (31)
Mclvor.
Rockey .
Hollman ....
Kutalo .
Burgess ....
Idaho (26)
i.. Hunter
. Moe
. Campbell
.. Lindley
... Romig
W. S. C. scoring, field baskets— '
F
F
C.
G
G
PAT ON LEAGUE OF NATIONS
WASHINGTON.—President Wilson arrived in Washington at 5 a. m. from
Boston. He and Mrs. Wilson remained in their special train until 8:40 before
going to the White . House. The announcement was made on his arrival
that the president had signed the six billion dollar revenue bill aboard his
special train last night. The measure carries a rider making the District
of Columbia "bone dry."
President Wilson today reiterates his entire confidence that the people
of this country will support his plan for a league of nations in a telegram
to Theodore F. Burton, president of the league of nations union.
President Wilson today signed the bill providing $100,000,000 for food
relief and the urgent deficiency appropriation bills.
Post Office Bill Passed Today.
WASHINGTON.—Final legislative action was taken today on the $400,
000,000 post office appropriation bill, carrying $200,000,000 for road con
struction in the next three years. The senate adopted the conference report
without a record vote. The measure now goes to the president for his ap
proval.
Pershing Announces More Troops Coming.
WASHINGTON.—The announcement by General Pershing's chief of staff
that 18 national guard and national army divisions are scheduled to sail
from France- before July 1, confirms the reports current here that the ex
peditionary forces are to be reduced to a total strength of 300,000 men by
the end of the fiscal year.
10
The New Constable
HI
.. h I I M
on hat mo»i! m
*
I:
. 7
w
\
%
ih

4
Rockey, 6; Kotula, 4; Hollman, 2; Mc
Ivor. Free throws—Mclvor, 3 in 6;
Hollman, 2 in 4.
Idaho scoring, field baskets—Hun
ter, 5; Moe, 2; Campbell, 2. Free
throws—Hunter, 8 in 11.
Referee—Hunter, Idaho.
;-to
AMERICAN SOLDIERS GET
FIFTY THOUSAND BOOKS
WITH THE ARMY OF OCCUPA
TION.—(Correspondence of The As
sociated Press.) -— Fifty thousand
books, consisting of works of history,
science, reference, fiction and others,
have been brought into the occupied
zone recently for the American sol
diers holding the Coblenz bridgehead
and the area on the left bank of the
Rhine.
Two distribution stations have been
opened in Trier and Coblenz, where
soldiers may borrow books by merely
signing their name, company and
regiment. In addition books are dis
tributed to the troops in the smaller
towns and the hospitals through the
several welfare organizations.
Distribution of books is in charge
of Judson T. Jennings, of Seattle,
Washington, for the library war serv
ice of the American Library Associa
tion. In the first four days the li
brary was opened in Coblenz more
than two thousand books were taken
out by soldiers doing garrison duty
in the city and vicinity.
COMMERCE HIER
SELECTS OFFICERS
J. S. HECKATHORN FOR PRESI
DENT-FIVE DIRECTORS NAM
ED-MANY AT LUNCH
Despite the bad weather about 60
were present at the weekly luncheon
of the chamber of commerce today.
New by-laws were adopted and of
ficers nominated for the ensuing year.
J. S. Heckathorn was named as presi
dent; J. J. Gill, vice-president, and
H. H. Simpson, Guy Wolfe, A. H.
Oversmith, Frank Slater and G. P.
Mix, were selected as directors. These
nominations will be brought up foi^
ratification at the next meeting of the
chamber.
E. C. Broom, formerly an attorney
oi2 Moscow, who went to Europe and
fought with the American forces
there was severely wounded and spent
mbnths in hospitals, was a guest of
tljjg chamber and delivered an inter
esting add ress. He told some very
interesting things he had seen and
experienced since leaving Moscow.
It was suggested that Moscow have
a monster Fourth of July celebration
this year and that it be devoted to
the soldiers from Latah county and
that every man who was in the army,
navy or mairnes, whose home is in
Latah county, be invited to attend and
participate in the celebration.
* SEAPLANE AND THREE
ENSIGNS LOST AT SEA *
*
* , .
J WASHING TON.—The loss of t
a . tug seaplane with three en- +
, signs of the naval reserve and y
* two mâchmists off the Virginia ♦
* coast was officially announced *
♦ by the navy department today. *
*
+
■ to
LECTURE TONIGHT
AT THE GUILD HALL
MR. SULLEY OF NATIONAL CASH
REGISTER, TO GIVE ILLUS
TRATED ADDRESS
Tonight the free, illustrated lec
ture to be given by Mr. Sulley, of the
National Cash Register company,
Dayton, Ohio, will be given in the
Guild hall of St. Mark's Episcopal
church, beginning at 8 o'clock. Mr.
Sulley has been showing these pic
tures throughout the northwest. He
had to show two nights in Spokane
to accommodate all who wished to see
the picturëk and hear the address.
There were 1.400 persons at the sec
ond lecture given Monday night.
The lecture tonight deals with busi
ness problems and shows how a man
who had failed in business finally
made a change in methods and made
as much of he?
as previ
ously made a failure. The pictures
cover a wide scope and varied sub
jects. The first pictures show the
welfare work which this firm started
many years ago and which was later
taken up by other manufacturers to
the benefit of their employes. There
is no charge for admission. Every
one is welcome and no one will regret
attending the lecture.
'■
NEW LAW PASSED BY LEGISLA
TURE REQUIRES GRADING
FOR OUTSIDE SHIPMENT ..
Boise.—Here is a copy of House bill
No. 104 which has become a law to
day. It will be observed that farm
products sold for shipment out of
the state must be inspected and grad
ed according to rules and specifica
tions hereafter to be arranged. These
inspection, grades, rules and regula
tions will be in accordance with rules
of grading throughout the Uuited
States, the purpose being to put the
Idaho farm products upon a commer
cial basis. I would be glad to have
you give the measures such publicity
as you may be able to do and the of
fice would appreciate any suggestions
as to the manner of carrying same
into effect. Its importance will be
appreciated and it is desired that the
measure will have as much publicity
as possible.
Very respectfully,
MILES CANNON,
State Director Farm Markets Dept.
The New Law.
"79:12. SALE OF GRADED AND
When
UNGRADED PRODUCTS,
ever any standard for the grade or
other classification of any farm pro
duct becomes effective under this ar
ticle, no person thereof shall pack for
sale, offer to sell or sell within this
state any such farm product to which
such standard fs applicable unless it
conforms to the standard, subject to
such reasonable variations therefrom
may be allowed in the rules and
regulations made under this article:
Provided, That any farm product may
packed for sale, offered for sale or
sold without conformity to the stand
ard or grade or other classification
applicable thereto when such product
will be consumed or used for manu
facturing purposes wholly within this
state, if it is not specifically described
state graded or packed under state
standard, in accordance with such reg
ulations as the director may ' pre
scribe."
BOISE.—Recommending the trial
of former state officials for the il
legal and criminal use of state funds,
and mentioning in connection there
with Moses Alexander, former gov
ernor and Representative C. S. Moody
former adjutant general, the special
investigating committee of the legis
lature filed its report with the legis
lature today. Both the house and
senate adopted the finding on a strict
party vote. A minority report was
filed by Representative Goff, demo
crat, in which he exonerated the state
officials, declaring they were within
their rights in creating the expenses
they did, as the country was at war
and an emergency existed.
Representative Moody was denied
the right to answer the charges
Thursday in the senate. He denied
and answered them in the house this
afternoon immediately after the re
port was read. Moody charged the
committee had been unfair in its in
vestigation and that it had not per
mitted him to see the documents in
troduced or to be represented by
counsel.
Need Was Urgent.
"We were at war," said Moody.
"The Germans were advancing to
ward Paris. The nation was crying
out for men. Idaho was trying to
supply its share. You of the major
ity would never have dared to make
a report criticizing the expenditure of
needed funds then. If you had you
would have been branded as slack
ers and driven from the borders of
Idaho and you know it. I did not get
one dollar I was not entitled to, and
you can't prove that I did. I did net
spend one dollar that was not ap
proved by the state board of examin
ers and I challenge you to prove that
did."
The report is a voluminous one and
takes up numerous items including
traveling expenses, the sale of a
typewriter for $12.60, automobile ex
pense for $1588 which Moody charged
to the state and which he claims was
necessary to attend to his draft duties.
It charges Moody traveled 81,927
miles in performance of his duties,
which is held to be "an exhibition of
virile activity, which, while doubtless
the subject of admiring wonder when
displayed by a globe trotter, is devoid
of much of its attractiveness when
viewed and considered from the stand
point of the poor and overburdened
taxpayer."
Ask Speedy Investigation.
Concluding the report says: "Con
cluding our report we feel, from a
fair consideration of the whole rec
ord, that there has been gross
ton and criminal disregard of the
sanctity of the public funds of the
state; that Mr. Moody and ex-Gover
nor Moses Alexander took advantage
war conditions upon the ground,
wan
apparently, that the people would
sanction any extravagant and illegal
expenditure of the public funds upon
their statements of military
sity; that the funds appropriated to
the adjutant general's office
largely expended to serve the politi
cal, selfish and personal purposes of
Mr. Moody and ex-Governor Alexan
der, and we feel it incumbent upon us
in order to create a proper regard for
the public funds of the state, to rec
ommend that a thorough and search
ing investigation should be made by
the attorney general and the
neces
were
prose
cuting attorney of Ada county to the
end that those responsible for wanton,
illegal and criminal use of the funds
in the adjutant general's office may
be brought to trial and that the people
of the state of Idaho may be fully ad
vised as to the conduct of its public
officials during the years 1917 and
1918; and we recommend that the at
torney general and prosecuting attor
ney of Ada county make such investi
gation .that the people may be speed
ily advised of these conditions and
the responsibility for the criminal use
of the public funds be properly
placed."
to
Mrs. Lewis Returns to East.
Mrs. Howard K. Lewis has been vis
iting Mr. and Mrs. M. E. Lewis since
Sunday. Mrs. Lewis left today for
/Indian Head, Maryland, where her
husband, Lieutenant Commander Ho
ward K. Lewis, has been stationed for
the next three years. At this great
naval station, the big guns are proved
and tested for the big battleships and
coast artillery.
Before being located here. Lieuten
ant Lewis served eight months ' as
chief gunnery officer on the battle
ship Illinois and during the war he
was commander of the patrol fleet off
the coast of Norfolk, Va.
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Lewis attend
ed the review of the overseas fleet at
New York. Mrs. Lewis has been vis
iting her parents at Boise, Mr. and
Mrs. R. S. Sheridan. Mr. Sheridan is
publisher of the Boise Capital News.
A Mexican Mnrder Trial.
JUAEX, Mexico.—Reconstruction of
the crime is a gruesome feature of
Mexican murder trials which was car
ried out in detial at the conclusion of
the preliminary features of Captain
Juan Azpieta's trial for the murder of
Private David Troib, United State«
army.
This court procedure includes the
reproduction of all the details of the
crime at its scene. Following the
testimony developed closely, the fatal
shot was fired into a pumpkin repre
senting the head of the American sol
dier and the relative positions of the
principals were reproduced, the de
fendant being forced to fire the shot
alleged to have killed the soldier.

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