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The Daily Star-Mirror
VOLUME VIII
MOSCOW, LATAH COUNTY, IDAHO SATURDAY, MARCH 1, 1919
NUMBER 131
REPUBLICANS OPPOSITION
Senator Lodge, republican leader in the senate, has called a
TO LIBERTY LOAN IS PLANNED
The republicans are planning to block every move of President Wilson
and are evidently planning t > start the campaign of 1920 within the next
few days.
meeting of republicans to ock the fifth Liberty loan and today Senator
Knox took a fling at the lea rue of peace. The telegraphic story from Wash
ington today, follows:
WASHINGTON.—Minority Leader Lodge today called a conference of
republican senators for 6:30 this afternoon to consider whether concerted ac
tion shall be taken in an effort to force an extra session by opposition to the
Victory Liberty loan bill authorizing seven billion dollars of new securities.
I Division of public sentiment on the question of opposition to the Victory
I loan bill, Senator Lodge said, is so pronounced that a conference of the full
republican membership of t ie senate is deemed advisable in view of the
I administration's plans to fc rce the issue of calling an extra session by
I calling up the loan measure.
' Senator Knox, of Pennsylvania, former secretary of state, in speaking
today in the senate, assailed the league of nations as striking down Ameri
can constitutional principles and the proposed new world organization which
he said would preserve the Monroe doctrine and save America from the re
sults of foreign intrigue and aggression. Senator Knox, who attended the
White House conference Wednesday declared the constitution of the league
as presented at the peace conference "sanctions, breeds and commands war."
Provides Funds for the Railroads.
Reporting favorably the general deficiency appropriation bill passed yes
i terday by the house, the senate appropriations committee today added as a
I rider the house bill authorizing $760,000,000 additional for the railroad ad
ministration.
I
y
Repeal Tax on Luxuries.
The house today passed, with a record vote, and sent to the senate the
resolution providing for the repeal of the luxury tax clause of the war
revenue bill. This bill imposed a 10 per cent tax after May 1, one higher
priced wearing apparel and many other articles.
Woman Suffrage to Come Up Again.
WASHINGTON.—A resolution similar to that of Senator Jones, chairman
of the woman suffrage committee, introduced yesterday, proposing state
enforcement was reported favorably by the house woman suffrage. Chair
man Baker said he would attempt to bring it up before adjournment.
INFLUENZA AGAIN
\
TEN NEW CASES DISCOVERED IN
SIX HOMES, ALL FROM HIGH
SCHOOL STUDENTS
T{
Influenza has reappeared in Mos
cow and today 10 cases are reported
in six homes. There are five cases
Dr. Adair, city health
i
( in one home.
officer says these all came from high
school students although it has been
spread to students of the grades.
Drastic measures are to be adopted
at once to stop the disease from
, spreading. Pupils of the schools will
1 not be permitted to attend any public
I gathering. This includes both high
t
school and grade pupils and they are
forbidden to attend picture shows,
dances, Sunday school and all other
gatherings. No one living in i home
where there is a case of tons: litis or
bad cold will be permitted to attend,
school or any public meeting. Dr.
Adair issued the following statementr
' ' "Owing to the fact that there are
15 or more cases, of infectious colds
and tonsilitis among the high school'
pupils and cases of influenza, report
! ed at the following places: A. Dillie,
[ 309 South Asbury; D. House, 130
I South Polk; H. Scheyer, corner of
t Mabel and Lind; Frank Price and
Mr. Higgins on North Main, there be
ing five cases at the latter.
"It has been decided after a con
ference with Superintendent Rich and
I the school board to prohibit all public
school pupils from attending public
gatherings. These include picture
shows, dances, basket ball games and
Sunday school, until further notice.
^•Pupils will not be permitted to go
to school from houses where there
are cases of severe colds or tonsilitis."
• }
M ..
V* ;
NEAR «ETTA
NINE CASES IN ONE FAMILY RE
QUIRES SPECIAL NURSE
ALL CASES ARE MILD
I
i
JULIAETTA.—The third outbreak
of influenza which has prevailed in
Juliaetta and surrounding country
during the last week seems now to
be well-nigh spent. '
Principal of Schools Earl Z. Crum,
Mrs. Crum and their little .daughter
all down with the disease at
were
the same time. A trained nurse for
them was secured from Kendrick and
the family are all now about well.
On Fix ridge another family, Mr.
and Mrs. William Heimgartner, are
both down with the flu, but are re
ported to have it only in mild form.
The family of Robert Heimgartner,
brother of Will, took the disease,
also his wife and five children, his
hired man and his sister—nine in all
—are down with the flu. The sister,
who had come up from Clarkston to
help take care of her brother and
his family, contracted the disease
promptly on arrival. The trained
who had taken care of the
a
♦ !
t
nurse
Crum family, left the first of this
week to take care of the nine pa
tients in the family of Robert Hein
gartner. The patients are all report
ed as doing nicely.
Allen Aldrich, a bachelor living
just below Juliaetta developed pneu
monia, following an attack of the
flu, but he too is reported to be con
valescing at this time.
+ REGULAR *ARMY LED* * * * *
IN D. S. CROSSES *
4*
*
*
*
* WASHINGTON.—Of a total *
4* of 3,918 distinguished service 4*
•F crosses awarded American sol- *F
■F diers for gallantry in action, *F
•F General March announced today *F
+ that 664, or more than double 4*
4* the number given td any other 4*
4> division, went to the Second 4*
4* division of the regulars. The 4*
4* First division was second, with 4
4* 300 and the Third division was 4 1
4> third, with 233.
4 , t + F4"M"H'4 , 4't + l M , 4"! 1
•F
r
CONVENTION AT SPOKANE A REC
ORD BREAKER FOR ATTEND
ANCE AND INTEREST
'■ ' Sixteen Moscow Methodists attended
the big conference of that church held
at Spokane this week as a part of the
great program for raising $105,000,000
for reconstruction work in devastated
sections of Europe and Asia. Those
who attended pronounce the conven
tion one of the best they bad ever
attended and the interest was great.
That the vast sum will be raised does
not admit a doubt, in the minds of
those back of -the great scheme.
But devastated sections of Europe
are not the only places where recon
struction work will be done. A great
industrial plant is to be established
at Seattle at a cost of $2,500,000, where
of all nations and all denomina
men
tions will be given employment and
helped mentally, morally and phys
ically. In the coal regions of Penn
sylvania are great areas without any
religious or social centers and these
to be helped. One coke region
in Pennsylvania, with 75,000 inhab
itants has ho church and no social
center. The Methodists plan to spend
$175,000 in that place to provide .for
these needs of the human mind. Edu
cational work in China and Japan as
well as in Europe, Asia and America
to be fostered and helped.
Those who attended the convention
Rev. and Mrs. H.
are
are
from Moscow are:
O. Perry, Mr. and Mrs. W. F,
eldge, Mr. and Mrs. Corliss McElroy,
Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Mickey, Mr. and
Mrs Homer Estes. S. J- Chaney, Dr.
J H Reid, Dr. F. M. Leitch, Mrs. A.
J. H. .Tonte and Elwin
The convention was held In
hotel, which
A. Frazee.
Scheyer.
was
„Lj Davenport
crowded with Methodists, there being
700 there at one time and they sang
songs of praise until the great hotel
fairly filled with the music. Rev.
Mr. Perry, pastor of the Moscow
church, is enthusiastic over the pros
pect of success in the greatest work
ever undertaken by a religious de
nomination since the Christian era
the
was
began.
Tv
Célébrât ed Birthday.
Charles B. Holt celebrated his 80th
birthday last night at his home. 117
South Jackson street, where he has
lived since 1884. About 25 of his old
time friends joined in the celebration
and spent a pleasant evening with
cards and reminiscences. - -
Mr.
games, ,
Holt came to where Staley, Wash.,
now stands, in 1877 and took, a pre
emption and a homestead claim, which
he proved up. He is bale, hearty and
hopeful. The evening was pleasantly
spent by the host and his guests, many
of whom have been his friends for a I
quarter of a century.
+ t + + +
+ SEVEN MILLION MEN
WERE KILLED IN. WAR +

+


+ WASHINGTON.—The battle ♦
♦ deaths during the war, among ♦
♦ all participants, as far as avail- +
♦ able statistics show, were given 4 *
+ today by General March, chief 4 *
+ of staff, as 7,354,000. This rep- +
♦ resents only the- men killed in ♦
♦ action or died of wounds. ♦
♦ Russia leads with a total of ♦
♦ 1,700,000; Germany is second, ♦
+ with 1,600,000; United States is ♦
♦ least, with 60,000; France lost +
4* 1,386,000; England's total was +
+ 707,700; Austria-Hungary, 800,- +
♦ 000; Bulgaria, $100,000; Turkey, ♦
+ 250,000; Italy, 460,000; Belgium, +
+ 102,000; Rumania, 100,000; Ser- ♦
|+ bia and Montenegro, 100,000. 4*
VETERANS PLAN A
SPOKANE INVITES MEN WHO
SERVED IN WORLD WAR TO
ATTEND MEETING
SPOKANE—Several thousand vet
erans, representatives of organiza
tions in the state of Washington of
soldiers and sailors who served in
the great war, will be called to Spo
kane in August to organize a Wash
ington military veterans' association
if a plan proposed by the local so
ciety, Sons of Democracy, Great War
Veterans, is carried out.
Commander Jack Abrams, Judge
Advocate Harold N. Nuzum, Field
Secretary P. H. Mutlersbaugh, of the
local organization, are behind the plan
and are making plans to see to its
consummation.
The proposal is that as many vet
erans of the present war as can, at
tend the convention, and that the 76
G. A. R. posts, 24 United Spanish
War Veterans' camps and four camps
of Veterans of Foreign Wars unite
with the Great War Veterans' asso
ciation.
"If our plans carry, this should be
the largest meeting of veterans ever
held in the city," said Commander
Abrams. "We expect that out of this
meeting will grow the Sons of De
mocracy association which will spread
throughout the United States, and
will have behind it as its fundamental
aim the suppression of sedition and
anti-American propaganda. We will
work for Americanism and America.
»
Funeral Sunday Afternoon.
The funeral of Victor Gustafson,
who died Thursday night, will be held
from the Swedish Lutheran church,
of which he was a member, at 2:15 to
morrow (Sunday) afternoon. Friends
of the family are invited,
will be in Moscow cemetery.
E. Oslund will conduct the services.
C. C. Gustafson, a brother of deceased,
arrived from Goodwater, Saskatche
wan, Canada, at 12:20 today. _
interment
Rev. J.
#
Conditions in Europe are causing much alarm for the unrest is spreading
all over Europe. Spain, which remained neutral with a strong leaning to
ward Germany and her allies during the war, is torn with a revolution and
has been placed under martial law. Bavaria is also under martial law and
a new revolution is expected to break out in Germany any time. In Spain
the people are protesting against profiteering and are looting the food
The cable reports of the disorders follow:
MADRID,Friday.—Martial law has been declared in Madrid where troops
are patrolling the streets. Order has been restored but some theatres have
been closed. This action resulted from rioting against profiteers today.
Provision stores and butcher shops were being attacked by mobs. The go\
ernment has taken possession of all bake shops.
Martial Law in Bavaria, Too.
PARIS_Soldiers and Workmen's congress at Munich has declared mar
Juwor alf"^v. ri a, according * . Zorich di.p.tch to The Matin,
Nçw German Revolution Feared. ,
LONDON—Further revolutionary movement in Germany is imminent ac
cording to reports reaching London through Holland today. The dispatch
adds that Chancellor Scheidman has résigné. .
Irish Question Will Not Down.
WASHINGTON.— President W'ilson today promised to meet a delegation
from the recent Irish race convention at Philadelphia after his speech in
New York Tuesday night. The Irish spokesmen desire to present résolu
JN6W lore 1 uebuay niguo. xnc r „
tions demanding self-determination for Ireland to the peace conference.
stores and meat markets.
"in
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:
First Harbinger of Spring
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L. SCHUMACHER HAS
I
I
RETURNED FROM OVERSEAS
C. L. Schumacher returned last
evening from Camp Lewis where he
was mustered out of the service. He
landed in New York about two weeks
ago and was sent to Indiana and then
to Camp Lewis.
Mr. Schumacher has been in the
service almost a year and a half and
sailed for France last July. He has
seen active service and was in the
battle of Argonne Forest three days,
where he was wounded September 29,
by a piece of shrapnel in the right
arm above the elbow and in the right
ankle. He is recovering slowly from
the effects of his wounds. His many
friends are pleased to learn of his re
turn.
I
— Ba
MILLIONAIRE BANDIT
IS KILLED IN MEXICO
MEXICO CITY.—Luis . Terrazas,
3d., rebel "general" and adventurous
grandson of the foriner multi-million
aire Chihauhau ranchman of the same
name, has been killed in the state of
Tlacaki, while serving with the ban
dits of Mercelo Caraveo, according to
reports received here from Puebla.
Terrazas, who was about 25 years
old, is credited with being the leader
in numerous sanguinary chapters of
the history of modern Mexican re
volts; Daring to foolhardiness, he
had; on numerous occasions been in
imminent peril of death, and, when
his body was recovered, it is said
to have borne the scars of 16 wounds.
His fatal escapade was venturing
alone into the village of Cholùla,
where he was set upon by nearly a
score of the inhabitants. He killed
three before succumbing to a machete
blow.
MOSCOW ELKS WILL
B. I*. O. E. LODGE WILL HOLD
FIRST DANCE IN MANY MONTHS,
MARCH THIRD
The Elks will give an informal
dance for their members at the Elks'
Temple next Monday evening, March
The following committee has
been appointed on arrangements; Geo.
Horton, Glen Sanders, H. Wilson, Guy
Curtis, E. W. Hickman and M. P. Mill
er. Dancing will start at 8:30. Good
music and refreshments will be pro
vided.
This is the first opportunity that the
members of this order have been able
to get together for one of their old
fashioned good times for a considera
ble period. Last winter its members
were" busy with 'war work and all
frivolity was under the ban. The us
ual social sessions of the lodge have
been dispensed with so far this sea
son owing to the flu ban.
It is anticipated that the Elks will
turn out Monday night, in large num
bers and dispel the spirit of the bans
which they have been under.
3d.
SOPKANE 8 INLAND ELECTRIC
+++♦+++++++++++++
+ MRS. MOORE COMMITS
SUICIDE BY HANGING *
+
4*
V
+
Just as The Star-Mirror goes ♦
♦ to press this afternoon word +
+ comes that Mrs. Moore had com- 4*
4* mitted suicide by hanging at the +
4* Bert Martin ranch, just across 4 1
4* the state line in Washington. 4*
♦ No particulars have been ob- ♦
•F tained.
■F
Her daughter, Mrs. 4*
Slater,
•F hospital with a baby a few days 4*
•F old. Undertaker Glen Grice has *
♦ gone to the Martin farm for the *F
■F body. The suicide occurred this *F
•F afternoon.
•j* ■{••{••{•■{••2*'|*«{«*S**|**S* a $* | ^**S* a {**i**{*
- pa -
+
PRE-LENTEN DANCE
GIVEN LAST NIGHT
LARGE ATTENDANCE AT GUILD
HALL ENJOYS HOSPITALITY
OF THE HOSTS
Messrs. Max Griffith, Harvey Smith
and R. S. Butterfield were hosts at a
charming party at the Guild hall, Fri
day evening. , Potted plants, cut flow
ers and banks of ferns were used ef
fectively in the decorattion of the hall,
and made an excellent back ground
for the attractively gowned women
and the men in their immaculate eve
ning clothes.
In the receiving line, with Messrs.
Griffith, Smith and Butterfield, were
the Mesdames Griffith. Smith and
Fishburn, and the Misses Hamilton,
McGregor and Newlin.
The hosts were very fortunate in
securing from Spokane an orchestra
which furnished excellent music for
those who wished to dance; cards fur
nished entertainment for those not
caring to dance.
Supper was served at 11 o'clock,
after which the dancing continued un
til 1:30.
The invited guests were;
Messrs, and Mesdames Axtell, Barton,
Bridge, Bush', Bleamaster, Bolding,
Leonald Brown, Bonnett, C. S. Clarke,
J. N. Clarke, Conwell, Carithors, Cur
tis, Cook, F. A. David, Homer David,
Howard J. David, Day, Emerson,
Eldridge, Felker, Forney, Frantz,
Gano, Heckathorn. Hatfield, Hodgins,
Hulme, Horton, Hutton, Haynes, Id
dings, Jenkins, Jensen, Jamison, Kos
tàlek, Lee, M. E. Lewis, H. T. Lewis,
Lindley. Little, Livingston, Lamphere,
McDaniel, McConnell, Meeker, Mat
The
thews, G. M. Miller, M. P. Miller,
tin. G. P. Mix, F. M. Mix, Newton, Nan
kervis, Neidig, H. H. Orland, C. J.
Orland,
Peterson,
Sanders, Sholes.
Stewart, Steele, Dr. H. J. Smith, Cal
Smith, Snoddy, Stanton, Thomson,
Thatcher, Thompson, Truitt, Veatch,
I Vincent, von Ende, Wallace, Whittier,
Wodsa
Oversmith, Patten. Parsons,
Richards, C.
Shields.
Richardson,
Simpson.
Willis, Wilson, Williamson,
dalek, Wright, Woolley, Witter. Zum
| hof.
j The Mesdames Byrns. Campbell,
Misses Anderson. Ashton, Bau
| er Bynls Burns. Brown. Bowers,
chapman, Chubbuck, Dermott, French,
Gllnd«uun Gabo, Goethala. Hawks
^ JggJJte! Senna. Moore,
A]oore ' Mo ,. ga n, 'Newman, Nusbaum,
Pove y,' Parsons, Plummer Winifred
Plummer, P^hardson, Foro. Riclrard
^ J 11 ^ vàrîce. Wegmann, Wilkni
i son. Willis, York. Ziese.
j' T 'i ie Messrs. Burbridge. Barber,
Cherpillod, Clements, Denneck, Dari
Hurlburt Johnson, Kerren, Keane,
Bindley Lipps, Marler. McCrea. Moe,
Me«.
Ne - ettig Richmon d. Scott, Samp
1 " Sutherland Smith, Staples, Still
ing g r Taylor, Thompson. Thometz,
Wright.
-~
Soldiers Get Extra Pay.
discharged soldiers are to be
$60, being two
pay. This is "grand and glorious
news" to the boys who h&ve been or
will be discharged from the service.
E C. Boom, of Moscow, who is as
sociated with A. L. Morgan, and is
himself a discharged soldier with a
personal interest in the matter, has
written to Washington to ascertain
the full details of procedure to get
this extra money. When he gets this
information it will be published in
this paper and Mr. Boom says he will
gladly help any bther soldier to. get
his extra pay. He requests all who
have been discharged to consult with
him and arrange for cooperative ac
tion in getting the money which the
department has announced will
given
war
be given to them.
Bs
Land Deal on Potlatch.
R. B. Parks closed a deal this week
whereby he came into possession of
the Munsterman farm on Potlatch
ridge. It is a splendid piece of land
and nearly every foot under cultiva
tion. The consideration was $35,000.
Mr. Parks also sold 160 acres of the
240 acre farm on which he now lives,
to William Bond. He will give pos
session of the farm to Mr. Bond and
will take possession of his newly pur
chased place next fall. -I* endrick
Gazette.
SPOKANE.—Junking of the entire
Spokane and Inland Empire railway
system, all traction and interurban
lines with the possible exception of
the Coeur d'Alene division, is in pros
pect unless the people of Spokane and
the Inland Empire give the company
their whole-hearted financial and
moral support.
yesterday's Chronicle by Traffic Man
ager Waldo G. Paine that the 12 city
traction lines of the company might
be abandoned if the streetcar merger
failed. Receiver Fred E. Conners of
the Inland today added that the whole
of the company's property might be
torn up in order to pay the bondhold
ers without further losses.
Inland Division Losing.
"The Inland division of the rail
road, which consists of the branches
to Moscow, Idaho, and Colfax, Wash.,
is costing even more than the Spo
kane city lines," he said, "and the resi
dents of these sections are not giving
the S. & I. E. their undivided support.
Proposed boycotts op the city street
cars, if the contemplated fare increase
from five to seven cents is put
through, have indicated that this will
give little relief on the city lines,
at least for the present.
"The combined Inland system dur
ing the year of 1918 lacked by 50 per
cent of enough net proceeds to pay
the taxes, to say nothing of the in
terest on the bonds or dividends on
the stock," Mr. Conners stated. "The
taxes were $120,000, in round num
bers, so the loss was approximately
$6000 a month;—a dead loss.
can
of Mr. Paine that in the event the
increased fare is not granted, we
would scrap the Spokane & Inland.
This not only applies to the street
car lines but also to the interurban
lines as well, especiall some of these
lines.
Coeur d'Alene Line Pays.
"The Inland division, to Moscow
and Colfax, is probably the poorest
paying property we have. *1 think
the Coeur d'Alene division, if oper
ated alone, would pay expenses. It
is the only paying property of the
railroad system."
The bonds outstanding against the
Inland amount to $4,500,000, accord
ing to Mr. Conners, and the return
from junking the trackage, rolling
stock and machinery, together with
the sale of right of ways, would re
imburse the bondholders for the
.amount of money they have invested.
Besides the Spokane street car
system, the company operates a line
to Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, with exten
sions to Hayden Lake and to Liberty
lake; a line to Moscow', Idaho, with a
branch to Colfax, Wash,, and a sub
urban line to Vera and Opportunity
connecting with the Coeur d'Alene
line west of Greenacres.
"If we have the moral and finan
cial support of the people of the In
land Empire, the whole system might
pull through," said Mr. Conners.
"Otherwise we can not afford to keep
paying out this deficit. The bond
holders can get back their approxi
mate investments by tearing Up the
lines.
"Our employes are asking wage m
creases pofenuTi-evSue
g SftfS
five to seven cents. Personally I
think that the Traction men, at least,
are ^solutell imimssible^for us to
.^absolutely imposable
"When the streetcar lines can not
make money when the power is fur
nished, as on the S. & I. E. at the
positive cost of production, there is
»100,.
000 a year less than it would be if
bought at commercial figures,
SÎ »one? bit rYghtforThe wort
ing people to boycott us when this
condition is true, and when we have
not enough to give the men the wages
th ®y ar ® en * ltled to?"
The abandonment of the Spokane
Inland system would mean that hun
drçds of men, most of them living in
Our
And
Spokane, em
ployment. Hundreds of thousands of
dollars, spent almost entirely in the
Inland Empire, would cease to be
paid out each year. Coeur d'Alene,
Moscow, Post Falls, Colfax and other
towns would be forced to rely on in
frequent service on the steam lines,
while Hayden lake and Liberty lake
would not have rail service of any
kind.
There would be no commutation
serv j ce between Spokane and Vera
an( j Opportunity, and several sections
Oils city would be deprived of
gtreetcar advantages,
C. F. Burr Dead at Genesee
Word was received here by tele-
phone this morning that C. F. Burr,
well-known pioneer of Genesee, died
there this morning of paralysis, from
which he had been a sufferer for the
past two years,
the best-known pioneers of
County and bad lived at Genesee for
more than 30 years. He is survived
bv four sons and three daughters. He
had a wide circle of friends and ac-.
quaintances to whom his death will
be a shook.
- SB -
Mike Mullaley of near Genesee la
trading in town today.
Mr. Burr was one of
Latah

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