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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, March 11, 1919, Image 4

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1919-03-11/ed-1/seq-4/

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Two big things about
Qrapc : Nuts
arc—wonderful flavor
£ sturdy nourishment.
But you can det a better
idea of Grape-Nuts by
eating it than you can
by reading about it.
Sold by Grocers Everywhere
dent of Jimtown lay shivering on his
bunk, without fire or food, and un
conscious. It developed later that he
had not eaten for three days. They
fought their way back to town thru
the blizzard with the aged man, and
it was found that he had lost his
reason through the privations which
he had undergone.
■tr
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DEAN MILLLER MAKES INTER
ESTING STATEMENT OF
VALUE IN STATE
That the timber owned by the Uni
versity of Idaho and its kindred
branches, including the various
schools and the agricultural college, is
worth, at present prices, more than
$30,900,600 is the statement made to
day by Dean F. G. Miller, head of the
department of forestry. But this is
only a part of the holdings of the
university and schools connected with
it. Dean Miller says that fully one
third of the state's lands are not sur
veyed and when all the surveys are
completed that there will be large
uni
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The price is 5 cents.
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versity and its cash value will be
greatly increased.
Dean Miller and the university fac
ulty and regents are interested in the
proposed timber bill which failed to
pass the senate Saturday. This bill
was intended to provide a state for
ester to look after the vast timber
wealth of the state, estimated at
than 130,000,000,000 feet, ..
to use Dean Miller's statement "Z_
lying out in the cold, unprotected and
ought to be looked after." The uni
versity, with $30,000,000 worth of
timber, is probably the largest holder
of timber lands in Idaho, with the ex
ception of the state, and Dean Miller
arrangement be made whereby there
will be a better organization for the
prevention and fighting of fires in
the forests of the state.
Dean Miller returned last night
from Boise whither he had been called
for consultation with the state land
commissioners regarding the cutting
of timber about Big Payette Lake.
After the timber had been advertised
for sale a strong protest was made by
citizens interested in the lake as a
summer resort against cutting the
timber on the lake shores.
Miller was called into the matter to
determine what, if any trees could be
cut on the lake border without
ring the scenic beauty of the lake.
He found that an important cutting
of timber could be made without de
facing the landscape and on his rec
ommendation
more
which,
Is
Dean
mar
cially settled.
Dean Miller reports an unusually
heavy snow fall in the mountains in
south and central Idaho which means
a splendid water supply this season
for irrigated sections
s>
SEVENTEEN YEAR
LOCUSTS COMING
GOVERNMENT SOUNDS WARN
ING AND TELLS HOW TO
COMBAT INSECT PESTS
A
Washington.—Great swarms of the
17-year locust will infest the United
States in late May and early June
this year, which is expected by sci
entists to be one of the worst "lo
cust years" on record. Experts of
the Department of Agriculture, how
ever, see nothing alarming in the
prospect.
Once regarded superstitiously as a
harbinger of disaster, the periodical
cicada, popularly known as the 17
year locusta because it comes at long
intervals, is seen now to be no more
than an ordinary non-poisonous insect
pest, which can do little damage if
proper precautions are taken. The
chief injury inflicted by the insect
consists almost wholly in chiseling
grooves in the branches of trees for
depositing eggs. Young fruit trees
sometimes are killed, but the dam
age generally seems greater than it
actually is, according to the entomol
ogists, and popular alarm is out of
proportion to the real danger.
Suggested precautionary measures
are:
Defer putting out young fruit trees
until next year; postpone budding op
erations; do no pruning this spring.
When the insects begin coming out,
hand pick them from young trees or
spray them with pyrethrum powder,
kerosene emulsions, or a solution of
carbolic acid or acetic acid.
Later, when the insects are ready
to begin laying, spray young fruit
trees with whitewash.
The Department of Agriculture has
kept close check for many years of
all the broods of locusts and can fore
cast accurately when and where the
pests will appear. Large regions will
be affected this year where one brood
appeared 17 years ago and in other
regions which suffered 13 years ago,
the states including Alabama, Dis
trict of Columbia, Delaware, Georgia,
Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky,
Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan,
New Jersey, New York, North Caro
lina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Car
olina, Tennessee, Vermont, Virginia,
West Virginia, and Wisconsin.
Belief that the 1919 brood will be
exceptionally large is based on the
fact that the 17-year brood coming
out this year is brood 10, perhaps the
largest of the 17-year brood, and that
18 of the 13-year family comes out at
the same time. The year 1868 was
the greatest year in history, when
brood 19, the largest of the 13-year
family, appeared in conjunction with
brood 10 of the 17-year family.
There will be three regions of great
set occurrence of brood 10, one cov
ering New Jersey, Maryland and east
ern Pennsylvania; another covering
all of Indiana, the greater part of Ohio
and southern Michigan; and a third
covering westaekn; North Carolina,
eastern Tennesse and northern Geor
gia. While brood 10 will affect 20
states, brood 18 will appear in only
five states—Alabama, Georgia, North
Carolina, South Carolina and Ten
nessee,. and only limited areas in those
states.
C. L. Marlatt, chairman of the Fed
eral Horticultural Board, who has
perfected the information on the ci
cada, calls the insect the most inter
esting in the world, because of the
spectacular swarms in which it ap
pears, its queer recurrence at long in
tervals and the portentous signifi
cance frequently attached to it. Ev
ery locust year has been a year of
fear and dread, even in civilized times.
Some people have fancied that they
could detect in the cry of the in
sect a resemblance to the name of the
Egyptian monarch*-, Pharaoh, who
persecuted the Israelites. Supersti
tion attached also to the shape of the
filmy
which
bars on the dicada's wings
seemed to form the letter "w'
interpreted as a forecast of war.
"Since this outbreak will come just
at the conclusion of the greatest war,".
Mr. Marlatt said, "and when even
imagination of the rural prophet
could hardly conjure up the liklihood
of another one, some new explanation
will apparently have to be found."'
SIGNS OF PROSPERITY
FOR BEET GROWERS
American Beet Sugar Co. made
918,000 bags of sugar during last
campaign. This compares with
086,544 bags for 1917-1918. It is be
lieved that at least 50 per cent more
ai reage will be planted to beets the
coming season.
This little news item relative to one
of the western beet sugar companies
is significant of a prosperous season
for thousands of farmers in western
states. Increased beet acreage is re
ported generally at a record price.
In this year of readjustment and
uncertainties of price and market
conditions, the farmers will realize
more than ever the value of an in
dustry in their midst which makes
possible a guaranteed price crop and
which also employs large numbers
of persons after the beet harvest is
over.—The Manufacturer.
Latah County Records.
Returns of Highway District No. 1—
Yes, 114; No, 5.
Returns of Highway District No. 2—
Yes, 47; No, 6.
R. M.— Z. L. Girard to Henry Mul
finger $5000, Lots 3-4 Sec. 19-38-5.
Rel.— (Marginal) Charles Lemman
to James Vassar, c-m 2-11-18; 5-6-18.
Army Discharge—Rex S. Strickland.
Forgot What He Needed.
From the Republican, Mt. Gilliad,
Ohio: The editor had an interesting
experience some time ago, when a
young gentleman came to this office
and asked Tor a copy of the Morrow
County Republican. He scrutinized
it carefully when a copy was handed
him, and then said: "Now I know!"
"What is it you are looking for," we
inquired. "My wife sent me after a
bottle of Chamberlain's Cough Rem
edy, and I forgot the name I went
to several stores and the clerks named
over everything in the line on the
shelf except 'Chamberlain's.' I'll try
again, and I'll never go home without
Chamberlain's Cough Remedy." The
Republican would suggest to the
proprietors of stores-, that they post
their clerks, and never let them sub
stitute. Customers lose faith in stores
where substituting is permitted, to
say nothing of the injustice to makers
of good goods and the disappointment
of customers. Mch.
THE SHOWDOWN
It was a worldwide poker game,
Bill Hohenzollern, all aflame,
Was raking in the chips like mad;
He was, in truth, a happy lad.
As fast as one could wink a wink,
He rendered Belgium on the blink.
Bill won his hat and coat and shoes
And several hundred I. O. U.'s.
He hooked old Russia in the pot
And dealt three aces from the bot
Tom of the deck and said: "You lose,
hand me all your clothes and shoes
mortgage on your ancient home,
And you may go outside and roam,
And show the world the fearful lot
those who strive with me und
Gott."
Bill Hohenzollern dealt once more
And won a lot of France's gore,
an English ship or
To show 'em just what he could do.
His chips were piling mountain high
And Bill looked on with eagle eye
(Or as a vulture one might say,
lie gazed upon the glad array).
He held the bulgars by the neck;
Roumania was a total wreck;
He owned the Finns, he owned the
Turks,
He almost owned the whole darned
works,
When Uncle Sam came breezing in
And dumped a barrel full of tin
Upon the table, just like that,
And calmly he took off his hat,
And with his accents soft and bland
He said:
So deal 'em out and deal 'em square,
Or there'll be music in the air."
The game went on. Bill lost his smile.
While gazing on his dwindling pile,
And as he anted now and then
He saw his stack of iron men
Grow smaller as the time went by.
He lost his fierce and eagle eye
And gazed upon the clock and said:
"It's almost time to go to bed.
Let's play another hand and quit.
And Uncle Sam said: "Aber nit.
You've got old Belgium's bunch of
kale,
You've made Kid Russia hit the trail
Without his shoes or overcoat,
You've even trimmed him for his goat
You almost made a bum of France
And beat him out of coat and pants,
And were it not for England's fleet,
John Bull would walk with naked feet
You dealt 'emfrom the bottom, Bill;
And won the pots almost at will.
But now you'll have tp deal 'em right
And I am here to play all night—
In fact, I'm here to play until
The River Styx is frozen, Bill."
And sb the game went on and on;
Old Bill grew cross and weak and
wan,
While Uncle Sam, without a smile
Raked in the last chip from Bill's pile.
Then when he'd stripped him to the
hide
He led the old arch-fiend outside
And pointing toward the ocean, said
"Get off the earth; your goose is dead;
There's just one place for brutes like
you,
So go to h—1, and stay there, too!"
I think I'll take a hand.
LEADS IN SWEET POTATOES
Alabama Raises One-Fifth of the En
tire Sweet Potato Crop of tho
United State*.
Montgomery, Ala.-—Alabama will
raise 16,568,000 bushels of sweet pota
toes Als year, a gain of over half a
million bushels over last year, when
was reported that 60 per cent of the
crop was lost through rotting, a loss
nearly $9,000,000, says the bureau
crop estimates of Alabama. This
year's estimate Indicates that Ala
bama has raised one-flftb of the en
tire sweet potato crop of tbe United
States and places Alabama In the lead
the production of this vegetable.
] ,
I
I
SAFE, GENTLE REMEDY
BRINGS SURE RELIE]
r ;
For 200 years COLD MEDAL Haar
lem Oil has enabled suffering human
ity to withstand attacks of kidney,
liver, bladder and stomach troubles
and all diseases connected with the
urinary organs, and to build up and
restore to health organs weakened by
disease. These most important organs
must be watched, because they filter
and purify the blood; unless they do
their work you are doomed.
Weariness, sleeplessness, nervous
ness, despondency, backache, stomach
trouble, pains in tbe loins and lower
abdomen, gravel, rheumatism, sciatica
and lumbago all warn you of trouble
with your kidneys. GOLD MEDAL
Haarlem Oil Capsules are the remedy
Try This For Sour Stomach.
Eat slowly, masticate your food
thoroughly. Eat but little'meat and
none at ail for supper. If you are
still troubled with sour stomach take
one of Chamberlain's Tablets before
going to bed.
Mch.
News from Khaki Boys
Corporal Frank A. Marsh, of Mos
cow, who is with the American forces
in France, has written his parents
the following interesting letter:
Grevers, France, Feb. 8, 1919
Dearest Mother and Dad:
How are you all and what is doing
at Moscow. I certainly hope every
thing is going fine and dandy. I have
not had a letter from home since
early in January. The mail must be
held up somewhere. I know I will
get some later on.
Has Clyde been discharged from
the hospital yet? I hope he has, and
also been discharged from the service,
for I know it is not the kind of a life
for him, especially in time of peace.
I certainly want to get back to the
States and be discharged, but Uncle
has us over here and he will turn us
loose when he gets ready.
The 91st has assembled at LeMans
all but Co.'s E and F, of the Ammu
nition Trains. The rumo is that we
will join them about the 20th and then
the division will sail for home about
the 10th of March,
better for me.
People have called France the land
of sunshine and shade trees. I cannot
agree with them, for it is just as cold
here as it ever was at Moscow, but
not so much snow.
The sooner the
There is plenty
of wind, however, which makes it
nice (nit.) Some of the fellows have
just retu ned from their furloughs.
They were at Larshun, near the Span
ish border. They say there was 18
inches of snow at that place, and
farther back near the Pyranees
was
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I ARGE quantities of ShinoiA are pur
chased by the Government to be sold
to the Soldiers and Sailors.
K
We aim. to make ShinoiA cost the men
serving their country and the public
back of the men, as little as possible.
War conditions turn 1 men's heads to
profit making. We believe friends
and users are more valuable than the
profit of the moment. \ That is why
you can buy ShinoiA at rf the same price
as always.
BLACK - TAN - WHITE - RED - BROWN
M
PRICE AS ALWAYS
TEW CENTS
you need. Take three or four every da]
The healing oil soaks into the cell« at
lining of the kidneys and drives
the poisons. New life ana healtSpjffi)
surely follow. When your normal iifb
has been restored continue treatmen
for a while to keep yourself in condi
tion and prevent a return of the dia
ease.
Don t wait until you are incapable
fighting. Start taking GOLD MEDA1
Haarlem Oil Capsules today,
druggist will cheerfully refund yom
money if you are not satisfied will
results. But be sure to get the origins
imported GOLD MEDAL and accept
substitutes. In three sizes. Seaiei
packages, At all drug stores.
You
lots and lots of snow, but they
had a fine time.
I am going on a few day's pass
Paris about the 16th. Just imagi
me in Paris, can you do it? Chane
are I will do all kinds of funny sfcui
in gay Paris. If we stay here lo
enough I may get a fu lough in
U. S. A. "
p. m. and Co. E captured all the he
ors, but one and that event west
Co.- F of the Ammunition Trains.
These boys from the south are
funny lot—nothing like the weste
fellows at all. Some of the chaps i
playing the phonograph. Music se
does cheer up the place if there was
something like this I don't know wl
we would do to pass the time,
makes me think of home and I w
sure make lots of noise when I g
our phonograph started again.
I told you about our service strij
and fir tree ensigna. Well ali t
fellows in the two companies 4
wearing them and our left arm
well decorated but not a man
either company wears
stripe (that is pretty good isn't^it '■
Our feelings have been hurt seveij
times but they don't rate the gi
stripe.
Is there anything new at the Vi
sity or is it the same old place?
was always slow for a college. ' T
Y is offering some sort of a colie
course in Paris and also London,
thought for a while I would enter c
of them, but that meant I would hi
to remain in the army until we f
ished, but decided I would rather w
to return home. I have just returr
from the Y. Bought some candy.
about the only luxury we can get.
sure long for some home made fudge
once more. What is all the folks
doing now and the kiddies, how
they? Is Bernice well again and
Ginger, is she still the same old Gin?
There isn't any news to tell you
and it is bedtime for a soldier,
give my best to all and tell them
am O. K.
We had a track meet tl
wou
a
a
CORP. FRANK A. MARSH.
y

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