OCR Interpretation


The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, March 11, 1919, Image 5

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1919-03-11/ed-1/seq-5/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for PAGE FIVE

}
ORPHEUM
LAST CHANCE TONIGHT
MARGUERITE
in
U
It
OUT OF A SKY
and
a
in
"THE COOK"
(A show you are not afraid to bring
your wife, daughter or sweetheart to
see)
COMING WEDNESDAY _ FRED
STONE in "THE GOAT"
CitÿNeW s
Weather—Idaho—Tonight and Wed
nesday, rain.
U. L. Young of Princeton and
D. Morrissey of Harvard are in
county seat on business.
Mrs. C. W. Jessup of Juliaetta and
son, W. A. Watts of Kendrick were
in Moscow Monday and Tuesday.
Herbert Johnson, who has been suf
fering an attack of the influenza
the home of his mother, Mrs. Frank
A. Johnson on East A street, is now
convalescent and went to his home
at Joel today.
Mrs. L. Woods of Alberta is visit
ing for a few days with Mrs. Howard
Scheiver east of Moscow.
Dishes, Dishes—Big shipment just
arrivd. Brackert's.
The Phoenix bridge club, which
was to have met this week with Mrs.
Meeker, has postponed the meeting
.until next week, Wednesday.
Leslie Dygert returned this morn
ing from Lewiston. Mr. Dygert will
leave in a few days to begin the man
agement of the large farm owned by
his father, A. Dygert and Dr. Adair,
at Cascade, Mont.
The Empire hardware store will
have an exhibition of the Maytag
washers on March 28. Two demon
strators will be here. Watch for the
advertisement next week.
138-144
Mr. and Mrs. L. Keene returned
this morning from American ridge.
Walter Cochran came up this morn
ing from Juliaetta.
Fat cattle and hogs wanted,
pay the highest market price at any
point. Call on or address J. G. Gib
son, Moscow, Idaho. 130-tf
Miss Ruth Fogle arrived home this
morning from Cottonwood.
Mr. and Mrs. Tom Weeks left this
morning for Coulee City where they
are moving to make their home.
Mrs. G. O. Brown went to her home
near Genesee, after remaining two
■weeks in the hospital in Moscow.
E. J. Bailey, senior member of
Bailey, Wicks ' Produce company of.
Lewiston and Clarkston, was in Mos
cow today on business.
Prof, and Mrs. W. D. Henry of
Pullman were in Moscow yesterday.
Roy Desnoyer went to Bellingham
yesterday to spend the summer with
his grand mother.
Fred Stone, for many years a fore
most comedian in musical comedies,
makes his public debut in motion pic
tures in "The Goat," a splendid
photoplay which will be seen in the
Goat at the Orpheum Theatre Wed
nesday and Thursday. Mr. Stone is
noted for his athletic prowess, and
his skill in all forms of agile and dex
terous gymnastic work. Upon the
stage, in many of his finest musical
comedy productions, he gave continu
ously new examples of his expertness
Will
in this direction.
edule as this will facilitate the mat
1 39
NOTE THESE PRICES FOR
i
Flour and Feed
at Flour Mill.
Steam Rolled Barley, per ton, sacked
Steam Rolled Oats, per ton, sacked ..
Shelled Corn, per ton, sacked .
Mill Feed "mill run" per ton, sacked .
Strictly good baled alfalfa hay, one bale or ton at. . 26.50
Full car lots less
Dry Red Fir and Tamarack Sawed Wood, per cord,
delivered .
Pine Wood, sawed, per cord
Ask for our flour at stores at following consistent prices:
Hard Montana wheat flour, sack .
Bluestem Patent Flour, sack ....
In Bbl. lots 20c per bbl. less.
Above prices save you 15 to 25c per sack on flour. We
guarantee every sack of flour. Money refunded at any
store if not in every was satisfactory. Why pay higher
price and freight for any other?
$51.00
54.00
62.00
39.00
9.00
7.50
2.80
2.70
MARK P. MILLER MILLING CO
MILLINERY
WITH CHARACTER
New creations in Hats herald each new season.
Come in and see the latest in Hats for Spring.
MOSCOW MILLINERY
Walter Jacksha returned home last
Va.,
Mr.
evening from Camp Stewart,
where he was mustered out.
Jacksha has been in the service over
seven months. A number of Latah
county boys returned with him, in
cluding Chas. Mauch of Genesee and
Tony Grindland of Troy.
The St. Mark's guild will meet to
morrow, Wednesday, afternoon with
Mrs. Bridge at 3 o'clock. Mrs. Cozier
will assist Mrs. Bridge as hostess.
Perry Carter went to Troy today
on business.
F. A. Thomson, dean of the school
of mines, has been requested to ad
dress the International Mining Con
vention at Vancouver, B. C., March
17, 18 and 19.
The April Delineators are now at
Creighton's.
Mrs. C. L. Gritman left yesterday
to spend a day in Spokane.
Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Anderson and
little son of Thorn Creek were in
Moscow today. Mrs. Anderson went
to Clarkston for a visit with relatives.
Mrs. A. L. Maxwell of Colfax was
a week end guest at the home of Dr.
and Mrs. Stevenson.
Walter May, 416 Lewis Street,
Moscow, was the first one to file a
letter in the Calumet Baking Powder
prize contest, which is open to all
children. See the advertisement in
Monday's paper. A cash prize of $5
goes to the winner of the contest.
P. J. Graves, representing the Sing
er Sewing Machine company, arrived
in Moscow Monday and will'take the
place formerly held by T. H. Hopkins,
who was recently promoted to general
manager of western agencies.
L. L. Young, farmer and bleeder of
purebred Shorthorn cattle, living at
Princeton, is in town today on busi
ness.
J. D. Morrissey, well known farm
er and live citizen of the Harvard
neighborhood, is a business visitor to j
Moscow today.
The Idaho Garage today received
two carloads of automobiles, one
from California and one from Lan
sing, Michigan. One car is loaded
with Oldsmobile touring ears from
Lansing, Michigan, and the other is
loaded with Chevrolet cars from the
California distributing center. Mr.
A. S. Frost, the manager of the
Idaho Garage, will begin unloading
the cars tomorrow. These are the
first of several carloads that Mr.
Frost expects to receive in the near
future.
138
ANOTHER GOOD BUY
Four room cottage, on paved street,
bath, toilet, lights; white enamel
wood-work, finished floors, for $1180.
Some cash, balance to suit. This will
be sold within a week—remember.
Metropolitan Investment Co.
139-141
Notice to Patrons.
All the schools will open tomor
row morning, March 12. In the high
school the report cards will be given
out £iid program arranged for the
second semester in the forenoon. Rec
itations will begin in the afternoon.
Hence it is important that every high
school student should be present if
possible.
In the fourth to seventh grades in
clusive final examinations will be giv
en in grammar.
High school students are requested
to come at 8:00; Irving school pupils
are requested to come at 8:30; Whit
worth pupils are requested to come
at 8:45. Will the parents kindly see
that their children arrive at the var
ious schools according ' to this sch
it
ter of taking every individual's tem
perature as required by the health of
ficers.
J. H. RICH, Supt.
-Pas
I
AGENTS ABE BUSY
MISS KELLY, TELLS OF THE
GREAT WORK THAT IS BEING
DONE IN IDAHO
The state of Idaho has accom
plished some splendid things thru its
home demonstration agents, accord
ing to statements made by Miss Amy
state leader of the home dem
onstration work.
There are now in the field three
state-wide workers, one city home
demonstration agent, one clothing
specialist, one health specialist, and
four county home demonstration
agents.
The four counties having county
agents are Bannock, Bonneville, Can
yon and Twin Falls. In Twin Falls
county alone there are three hundred
women enrolled in the farm bureau.
The work of the demonstration
agent is as varied as the needs of the
rural women.
The demonstration agent of Bonne
ville county was able to secure nurses
who made eight hundred visits in that
county during the flu epidemic.
CARRY FOOD BY AIR
ot, _ .
Plan to Supply Northern Province*
... ... „
Until Wrecked Railroads Are
Restored.
French to Feed Hungry by War
Planes.
Paris—The French government has
decided to install an airplane service
to feed Inhabitants of the redeemed
districts of northern France until rail
ways destroyed by the Germans In
their retreat can be restored.
With 200 airplanes at least 200,000
people of the stricken provinces can
be fed dally. It Is believed this num
ber of planes could carry 100.000
pounds of flour, 10,000 pounds of sugar,
10,000 pounds of butter, 30,000 pounds
of vegetables and 10,000 pounds of con
densed food.
While this will be the most gigan
tic scale on which airplanes have been
used for feeding a country, yet the
system Is not entirely new.
During the war it was successfully
used by the British in carrying food
to their troops in Mesopotamia, Pal
estine and Macedonia. In November,
1917, during the French offensive
against the Chemin des Dames, it was
used by the Germans. A detachment
of their troops, completely encircled,
was kept supplied with food by air
planes that dropped baskets containing
bread, kraut, canned meat and other
supplies.
For the airplanes that will be neces
sary for the new service for feeding
the north of Prance, the French gov
ernment will first of all make use of
its own bombing machines. After this
expects to be able to utilize not less
than 100 planes turned over by Ger
many the terms of armistice. In
addition, France hopes that both Eng
land and the'United States will place
at her disposal a number of their
bombing machines now lying Idle in
Prance.
Vital as the new service will be for
feeding the north of France, It also
will help solve the problem of the grad
ual transformation of the military avl-1
atlon service for peace times.
I Negro Wins War |
Cross in Crap Game |
New York.—A disconsolate In
dian was among-the passengers
on the George Washington,
which docked in New York
city with a load of returning
Yank troopers. The cause of his
woe was a Chicago negro. The
Indian was Corporal Walter
Snow of West Virginia, known
as "Chief Little Dog."
He won the croix de guerre
in France, but on the ship he
met a Chicago negro, and after
he had lost all his money in a
cfap game that ensued he staked
his croix de guerre against $1.50
and the Chicago negro got that, |
too. ' $
il
■>
KEEPS WATCH ON
SEAMEN'S HEALTH
Uncle Sam Will Take Good Care
of His Merchant
Crews.
:
SEAMAN'S BOTTLE IS LATEST
Contains Passports to Good Health by
Providing Free Hospital Treat
ment Anywhere—Days of the
Dog's Life Now History.
Washington*—Uncle Sain is getting
more watchful of the health of/his
merchant crews as the great American
peace-time lleet continues to grow. |
The latest innovation of the United
States shipping board in the "seaman's
bottle," which has aow become one of
the cherished possessions of hundreds
of American seamen.
This little glass bottle, small enough
to he carried in the vest pocket, con
tains passports to good health—print
ed forms which, when tilled out by a
ship's captain, will gain admittance for
the holder to any Utdted Slates ma
| rine iiospitai or relief station of the
public health service in every impor
tant port in the United States. On a
foreign voyage the application will pro
vide tlie seaman with the best medical
care, free of charge, on application to
the United States consular officer.
At present the bottle is being pro
vided only for men who have been
trained for a sea career by the recruit
ing service of the shipping board, but
in tlie opinion of Surgeon General
1
Ulue every American seam «n should
have one.
It is In port that the new ''seaman's
bottle," which was originated by Dr.
Louis W. Croke, medical director of
the shipping board recruiting service,
plays its chief part. A seaman in need
of medical attention lias merely to dig
the bottle out of ids kit, bring the
printed form to his skipper to be tilled
out and then go ashore to the nearest
federal official.
j
j
J
Free Hospital Care.
The label which bears the imprint of
the board's recruiting service informs
the seafarer that he is entitled to free
I hospital care no matter what his sta
j tion aboard ship. The term "seamen,"
ployed on hoard in the. care, preserva
tion or navigation of the ship, and it
I.even includes those who are in the
>n board, of those engaged in
such care, preservation or navigation,
When discharged by the tiled icq 1 all
tfaurlfieg tin- American
... ... ,.
given free passage to the port from
wlliL , h he orig inaliy signed, unless the
articles provide for discharge else
where, or if In a foreign port to some
port In the United States. He must
serve on board the ship on which his
passage has been arranged If possible.
The "seaman's bottle" not only will
Impress upon Americans who are going
to sea the privileges to which they are
entitled as seamen of the United
States but will preserve the certificate
and keep) it clean.
Years ago. In the days of the clipper
ship, and even since that time, the sick
or disabled American sailor at sea or
In a foreign port hgd no resource, but
the charity of his captain or ship
mates. Old-time skippers generally
prescribed and supplied a blue pill and
the crews w ere not burdened with
funds to lend.
service.
Is
seaman
Harrowing tales have been told of
those dark days of the merchant ma
rine, of men forced to lie for weeks
in cramped, foul-smelling forecastles,
often beset by rats and without'proper
food, light, air or clothing.
If the man lived until the ship
reached port some sort of care might
be provided for him, but hundreds
lied, were buried at sea ; their .togs
were sold and they were soon forgot
ten.
Must Carry Medicines.
But the days when the life of a sail
was a dog's life at best are now his
tory. Every vessel flying the Ameri
can flag and engaged on long voyages
required to carry a chest of medi
cines suitable for the treatment of
common ailments and Injuries. Fail
ure to comply with this law subjects
the master or owners of the vessel to
a heavy fine.
Scurvy, that scourge of the old days,
has practically disappeared from the
American mercantile marine because
of the liberal supplies of lime or lemon
juice, sugar and vinegar that are now
required to be carried on every ship
on a long voyage and to be given dally
to the crew within ten days after salt
provisions have been chiefly served to
them. In the days of yore "salt junk"
was the main item on every foc'sle bill
of fare. This food, consigned to the
vessel in barrels, was generally stowed
below as ballast and sometimes re
mained there for a long time before
being requisitioned for the crew. This
diet, with the lack of fresh vegetables,
caused scurvy.
Adequate hospital facilities aboard
ship also are provided. The law re
quires that in addition to the space al
lotted for lodgings, which must be
roomy and well ventilated, all mer
chant vessels of the United States,
which ordinarily make' voyages of
more than three days' duration be
tween ports and which carry more
than twelve seamen, shall have a suit
able hospital compartment with at
least one comfortable bunk for every
twelve seamen aboard.
9
• *70*
M
fi
■ V,
<S>
(j)
üb
<3-*

m
./ir
ß
\
Èr
-, 1 ^ ni.
mt
2
i
v
<3
2
r~ n.
%
E
23
a
I
■3d*
mtf
7T/
V
;î.
A
&
V"
E
©
ZS
m
\éà
m
COMBINATION CREAM
Will not Grow Hair on the Face
yp you are fond of a "vanishing" cream, try this new
Combination Cream Jonteel. If you prefer a cold
cream, try it. For this new kind of face cream combines
the advantages of both these types—yet is neither greasy
or greaseless. It sinks into the skin, to soften, heal and
beautify. Makes a wonderful base for powder. Take
home a jar of Combination Cream Jonteel today.
50 *
THE OWL DRUG STORE
S. L. WILLIS, Proprietor
Wm. Langrois and R. Hibbard of
the university, went yesterday to
Spokane on work for the annual.
sa
LIEUTENANT EVERLY
RETURNS TO MOSCOW
Lieutenant "Rube" Everly, Ag. '18,
just returned from France, arrived in
Moscow Tuesday preparatory to tak
ing up his duties as assistant com
mandant.
Lieutenant Everly left the United
States June 26, 1918, with the famous
91st division. He was at the front
several months until October 9th
when he was wounded in the leg byi
a high explosive shell. This occurred!
during the heavy fighting on the Ar
gönne sector where Everly was sta
tioned at that time. After three
months in hospitals he returned
the United States with a number of
other wounded officers reaching
York January 18.
While at the front Lieutenant Ev
erly say Lt. Lawrence Bonneville and
Clyde Humphries, later meeting Lt.
Harry McDougall the day he receiv
ed his second decoration.
Witter-Fisher Co.
5|
V
PIPELESS KUBNACES^ ^
Round Oak Pipeless Furnaces
Before buying see our
s
PHONE 230
,In transit Improved
and Moist Air Furnaces.
and get our Prices.
IT?
fij
Show Room
]7TiT rmi1 ^ illl,|Ll11
h'l, ■iii || iiiiii' l ., irTrrnMIii
c
:=^=5S==35=^=
PUBLIC SALE
Having rented my farm I will offer at Public Auction at my farm,
located 1 mile south of Moscow, on
Monday, March 17
Commencing at 10 a. m., the following described property, to-wit:
Machinery, Etc.
1 3-inch truck wagon.
1 3%-inch Moline wagon.
1 full truck wagon.
1 2-seated carriage.
1 top buggy.
1 cart; 1 Galloway Manure
Spreader,
1 14-inch gang plow.
1 18-inch sulky plow.
1 4-section harrow.
1 3-section lever harrow.
1 harrow attachment for gang
plow.
1 tower cultivator.
1 right lap.
1 fanning mill.
1 six foot McCormick mower.
1 root cutter.
4 sets of good harness.
Some plow harness.
1 set single harness.
2 saddles and bridles.
Other things too numerous to
mention.
Live Stock
1 Gray Gelding 5 yrs. old, wt.
1700.
1 Gray Gelding, 6 yrs. old, wt.
1800.
1 sorrel mare, 10 yrs. old, wt.
1800, with foal and services
paid for.
1 Black Mare, 11 yrs. old, wt.
1500.
1 Black Saddle Horse, 7 yrs.
old, wt. 1300.
1 Bay Filley, 3 yrs. old, wt.
1600.
1 Bay Filley, 2 yrs. old, wt.
1600.
2 Sorrel Yearling Geldings,
blocky.
1 Bay Shire Suckling Mare colt.
All of the above horses perfect
ly sound with the exception
of a few minor wire scratches
TERMS OF SALE—All sums of $20 and under cash, over that
amount time will be given until October 1st, 1919, on approved
bankable notes bearing 10 per cent interest.
FREE LUNCH AT NOON
Owner
JOHN PEASLEY
CHAS. E. WALKS, Auctioneer
J. G. VENNIGERHOLZ, Clerk
i
NOTICE TO ELECTORS
Notice is hereoy given that all qual
ified electors, who desire to vote for
the following hereinafter named of
ficers at the General City Election, to
be held in the City of Moscow, Idaho,
on the 22nd day of April, 1919, unless
heretofore registered according to the
laws of the State of Idaho, shall ap
pear before the undersigned at the
City Hall and be registered on or be
fore the 19th day of April, 1919.
All qualified electors who voted
within their respective Wards in said
City of Moscow, Idaho, at the last
General City Election are not re
...
qlIire< * re Sister.
The following named officers will
be voted for on the said 22nd day of
! April, 1919, to-wil : A Mayor, two
ICouncilman from each Ward, a City
to|CIerk, who Is Ex-Officio Police Judge,
! to hold office for a period of two years
Newifrom the first Tuesday in May. 1919,
j to the first Monday in May, 1921.
Dated this 25th day of February.
j
j 1919.
:
j
J. R. STRONG,
City Clerk.
127-131-133-137-139-143-145-149

xml | txt