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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, March 17, 1919, Image 3

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn89055128/1919-03-17/ed-1/seq-3/

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WILLIAMSON'S NEARING THE END!
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All those fine imported laces, trimming, em
broideries now on the Bargain Counter for less
than one-half you can procure the same goods
for, if you were lucky enough to get 'em at all.
Men's union suits for 50 cents; women's spring
suits, values to $32.50, for $8.75; wash street
skirts 98 cents, values to $3.50; 65c and 75c
brassieres for 25 cents; wide silk and satin ribbons
going for a dime—all the notions that are 10 cents
everywhere, here for a nickel.
Most astonishing prices ever asked for good
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stock, some less than one-half, nothing more than
one-half. Do not tarry, every hour sees some line
closed out entirely—GET WHILE YOU CAN.
SPECIAL CLOSING NOTICE to make the
service still better—We will, beginning tomorrow,
Tuesday, close the store from 12 to 1 p. m. or dur
ing the lunch hour. Open promptly at 1 p. m. with
a full working force, thus insuring you against long
waits, quicker, snappier services. Make a note of
this, store closes during the lunch hour each day
until the final stocks are sold.
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STORE CLOSES—SEE DETAILS
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merchandise, you'll find asked for all remaining
merchandise. One-half price governs the whole
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WILLIAMSON S
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The Store That's Still Your Best Friend
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in
"THE LAW OF THE NORTH"
and "SLEUTHS," Sennett Comedy.
TONIGHT AND TUESDAY
COMING—"DOUG" FAIRBANKS
Weather—Idaho—Tonight cloudy;
Tuesday, rain.
Mr. and Mrs. Albert Bailey return
ed home today from Bremerton.
Miss Mayme Christianson, teacher
near Blaine, was in Moscow, Satur
day.
.
Miss tuiia Smith, who teaches in
District No. 72, spent the week end at
her home in Moscow.
L. L. Young of Princeton is in
town today on highway business.
Oliver Cargill, who has been work
ing for Ivan Williamson on the dray,
left today for his farm at Juliaetta.
Born, yesterday to Prof, and Mrs.
Wodsedalek, a son.
Mrs. C. L. Drew is spending a few
days in Spokane on business.
Kenneth Anderton returned home
today, being mustered out of the naval
service.
Dishes, Dishes—Big shipment just
arrivd. Brackert's.
138-144
Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Featherstone of
Mr.
Featherstone is recovering from a re
cent operation for appendicitis.
Mrs. C. T. Summers and son,
Wayne,' of Viola, are in town today.
Angus G. David of Bovill is in Mos
cow filing his discharge papers from
the army. Mr. David was 17 months
in France with the 20th Engineers.
He has a brother still in the service
in France.
Mrs. J. S. Klaus of Lewiston has
been visiting several days with Mrs.
Jeff Holm and Mrs. J. B. Gilchrist of
Blaine.
Mrs. Geo. Sawyer of Princeton is in
town today on business.
The Faculty 'Women's club will
meet tomorrow afternoon at 3 o'clock
at Ridenbaugh hall. A good program
has been arranged for the meetings
There are yet to be only a few meet
ings of the club before the end of the
year and the secretary asks that all
members please bring dues tomorrow,
pay the highest market price at any
point. Call on or address J. G. Gib
son, Moscow, Idaho.
"Victory" three-cent stamps are
now on sale at the postoffice. These
stamps will not be handed out to the
patrons, unless asked for at the date
of purchase. The new stamps are now
on sale at the Moscow' postoffice and
can be used the same as the ordinary
three-cent stamp. Patrons are urged
to ask for them. They have a hand
some design and are very attractive. I
Viola are in Moscow today.
130-tf
NOTE THESE PRICES FOR
Flour and Feed
at Flour Mill.
Steam Rolled Barley, per ton, sacked ..$51.00
Dry Rolled Barley ..
Steam Rolled Oats, per ton, sacked ....
Dry Relied Oats .
Shelled Corn, per ton, sacked .
Mill Feed "mill run" per ton, sacked .. .
Strictly good baled alfalfa hay, one bale or ton at. . 26.50
Full car lots less
Dry Red Fir and Tamarack Sawed Wood, per cord,
delivered .
Pine Wood, sawed, per cord .
Ask for our flour at stores Kt following consistent prices:
Hard Montana wheat flour, sack.
Bluestem Patent Flour, sack .
In Bbl. lots 20c per bbl. less. Many others ask
more but they are not worth it.
Above prices save you 15 to 25c per sack on flour. We
guarantee every sack of flour. Money refunded at any
store if not in every way satisfactory. Why pay higher
price and freight for any other?
. 49.00
.54.00
. 52.00
. 62.00
. 39.00
.. . 9.00
. .. 7.50
... 2.80
... 2.70
MARK P. MILLER MILLING CO.
Spring Style in Hats
UNQUESTIONABLY
Our Spring Showing includes Millinery for
every type of wearer. Everyone can be becoming
ly fitted with a Chapeau of irresistible chic.
MODERATELY PRICED —$5.00 TO $28.00
MOSCOW MILLINERY
kane.
Mrs. Oscar Haig, who has been vis
iting a few days with Mrs. Carl Smith
and Mrs. Chas, Schroeder and other
friends, left this morning for her home
in Canada.
Mrs, Wm. Mason of Everett. Wash.,
is visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs.
J. J. Keane.
Mrs. Mary Bryden of Pullman spent
the w r eek end, the guest of Mrs. Wm.
Staples.
Prof., J. A. Kostalek arrived home
yesterday for a week's visit with his
family. Mr. Kostalek had been work
ing for the government at Washing
ton, D. C.. but since the closing of the
war, his company is disbanded and he
is spending his leave of absence from
the university at the agricultural col
lege of North Dakota at Fargo.
Miss Alma Nedros, who was home
for a few days' visit, returned yester
day to Spokane.
Mr. and Mrs. K. C. Marier left yes
terday for Poison, Mont. Air. Marler,
w'ho has been working for the brick
plant at Joel, will go to Canada to
run a tractor on a large farm.
Ed .McGuire of Bovill, who is in the
employ of the Potlatch Lumber com
pany, came to Moscow' to visit a few
days with friends.
Dean Iddings attended a meeting
of the Northwest Livestock associa
tion in Lewiston, Saturday.
Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Larson returned
yesterday from a week's visit in Spo
' Orrin Smith returned home today
! from Camp Lewis where he was mus
tered out of the service. He has been
also at Camp Kearney, Cal. He en
tered the service last June.
Alvah Strong and family of Cora are
visiting a few days in Moscow with
relatives.
Lawrence Johnson and Lars Larson
of Troy, were in .Moscow today. The
former has a son in the service, who
entered the army (n September and
reached France two days after the
armistice was signed. The latter has
just been discharged from the army.
He was at Camp Lewis. They left for
Potlatch, where they will visit rel
atives and friends.
Mr. and Mrs. Ray Walker visited
yesterday in Pullman.
Miss Lavern Savage went to Pull
man Sunday.
Herman Nedros, who has been in
the naval service a year and a half,
arrived home last week from Brem
erton. Mr. Nedros served six months
in France as quartermaster.
Ruby Chapter, No. 9, Order of East
ern Star, will hold its monthly meet
ing, Tuesday evening, March 18, at
7:30 in the Masonic temple. Mrs. Min
nie {lobbs of Mountain Home, grand
matron for the state of Idaho, will
make her official visit to the chapter.
There will he initiation and refresh
ments.
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W. C. T. U. MEETING
INDEFINITELY POSTPONED
The meeting of the W. C. T. Ü.
which was to have been held next
Wednesda}', has been indefinitely post
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WHERE EVERYBODY GOES
COMING—WEDNESDAY
OLIVE TELL
A Broadway Star in
"SECRET STRINGS
THURSDAY AND FRIDAY
MORMA TALMADGE
in
"HER ONLY WAY" '
SATURDAY
Matinee and Night
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"THE TURN OF THE WHEEL'
pon^d. This step was taken owing to
the influenza situation. The date of
the next meeting will be announced
as soon as possible, when a full at-
tendance will be desired.
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FORMULA FOR SQUIRREL POISON
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Special Bait for Columbian Squirrel,
The Columbian ground squirrel poi
son bait is prepared by combining in
dry mixture one ounce of powdered
strychnine (alkaloid) and one ounce
of baking soda, one teaspoonful of i
saccharin and three tablespoonfuls of I
flour, adding a little cold water and j
stirring thoroughly to a smooth, !
creamy paste. This mixture is dis- 1
tributed uniformly over 12 quarts of |
oats and the poison baits scattered one |
teaspoonful to a place. This poison
Now Here
T 0DAY
Tomorrow
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FOUR SHOWS DAILY—2:00, 3:30, 7:00 and 8:30 l>, .11.
Tu thoroughly enjoy this picture it's highly important yon
•see the first scene, therefore it's suggested you seleel the
show yon wish to attend and he in your seal a few mo
ments ahead of starting time.
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THIS is THE FUTURE
WHICH ATTRACTED
SICH HUGE CROWDS
UN SEATTLE, TACOMA
AMI PORTLAND THAT
TRAFFIC WAS BLOCK
H
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ED.
M
MACK SENNETT'S
GREATEST PICTURE. AND SUPREME TRIUMPH—A
SEVEN-REEL COMEDY DRAMA WITH A PUNCH AM) A
KICK UNANIMOUSLY ( ONCEEDED TO BE THE BEST
PICTURE SEEN IN THREE YEARS.
MICKEY
u
FEATURING
This lioyden-liaruni. scann» klssahle
imp is as wild as the pine-scented
w inds of the West, and she digs a deep
hole in your heart, where her sweet
ness will linger like the fragrance of
a briar rose.
MABEL NORMAND
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KENWORTHY
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le; NIGHT 50c, Children 25c
PRICES—MATINEE 25c, Children
Including Tax
should be used within 10 to 14 days
after preparation, as otherwise the
material will dust off the grain. If
the poison wastes too freely, the grain
may be placed in a tub or other vessel,
sprinkled with a little water and
mixed to moisten it before distribu
tion.
Columbian ground squirrels are not
I controlled easily as they hull oats
[ very carefully before eating them and
hence avoid the poison. Therefore
the method outlined above is used,
As the squirrels hull the poisoned
oats prepared in this way, the poison
flakes off in the rodents' mouths and
kills them. The Columbian ground
squirrel infests the wooded sections
of Idaho north of Boise and Bellevue,
'It has longer ears and tail and is of
larger size than the ordinary ground
squirrel. It also has an obscure
brown colored streak along the mid
dle of its back, while the hind
tiens of its hips and thighs
bright brownish-red color.
Poison ground squirrels as early in
the spring as possible, as in this way
the natural increase of young squir
rels is eliminated. The poisoning
campaign should be continued thru
out the year until the section is free
of these pests. The rodents will eat
the poison baits at any time. At
tention should be given to destroy
ing the squirrels in all their haunts
in pastures, uncultivated fields, fence
rows and roads as well as from the
cultivated fields where complete ex
termination of the pests is sought
por
are a

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