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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, March 18, 1919, Image 1

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The Daily Star-Mirror
▼OLUME VIII
MOSCOW. LATAH COUNTY. IDAHO TUESDAY, MARCH 18. 1919
NUMBER 145
The peace conference is getting down to business and trying to bring mat
ters to a focus. The five great powers are conferring together frequently
»nd trying to rush matters so that the treaty may be presented to the cen
tral powers within the next few days. So urgent is the business that Pre
mier Orlando, of Italy, has asked the Italian parliament to adjourn for two
weeks so that he can be in constant attendance at the sessions and the
Other premiers and President Wilson have urged Lloyd George to not return
to England for two weeks.
England and Japan have their troubles, outside of the peace conference.
Egypt is in a turmoil, and Ireland is causing trouble for England, while
Korea, which country Japan took over at the close of the Russian-Japanese
war, now demands independence.
Fighting against the Bolsheviki is tha only military activity reported in
today's cablegrams.
Following are the stories told by the cables today:
President Wilson Holds Conferences.
. PARIS, 8:40 a. m.—President Wilson will hold important conferences to
day with Premiers Lloyd George, Orlando and Clemenceau at the Parise
White House. The question to be discussed is securing accord between the
great powers on all phases of the peace treaty and its early presentation
■ to the Germans. It is expected an agreement will be reached as to the
' .inclusion of the league of nations as an integral part of the peace treaty in
accordance with the resolution already adopted by the peace conference.
German Forts to Be Dismantled.
PARIS, 11:23 a. m.—The fortifications on Heligoland Island, Germany's
formidable North Sea base, must be dismantled. This decision was reached
today by the supreme allied war council. It also decided that Kiel canal
should be internationalized and made available to ships of all nations on
even terms.
Ownership of Cables to Be Referred.
The British delegation to the peace conference, it was announced today,
bas consented to refer to the supreme council the question of the future
ownership of the German cables to America. All parties interested are pre
paring briefs on this subject.
Will Divide Warships Later.
The disposition of the German warships in unlikely to be included in the
treaty of peace, according to the American peace delegation's views. Ger
many, however, will be required to surrender title to the ships and their
ultimate ownership will be determined, later.
Beg Lloyd George to Remain in Paris.
A letter signed by President Wilson and Premiers Clemenceau and Or
lando were handed to Lloyd George this afternoon, strongly urging him
to postpone for a fortnight, his return to England, in view of the emergency
. of problems before the peace conference. Lloyd George will submit the
letter to the British cabinet. It is understood he will act according to its
views.
Bolsheviki Are Still Fighting.
STOCKHOLM.—Fighting has been resumed against the Bolsheviki along
the Lithuanian front, according to an official Lithuanian statement, which
adds that the Bolsheviki have been severely defeated at Soda and- Paginal.
r , "Southeast of Vilna we are advancing victoriously and forcing the enemy
to retire along the who'Ie front," says the dispatch.
Esthonian Forces Defeat Bolsheviki.
. COPENHAGEN, Monday night.—Esthonian forces are again masters
of the situation on the Pskov, according to Esthonian telegram which says
Esthonia launched a heavy counter attack in that region.
Serious Rioting in Egypt.
LONDON.—In the recent rioting in Cairo, Egypt, believed to be due to
nationalist agitation, six persons were killed and 31 wounded, according
to a Cairo dispatch.
At Tanta, on the Nile river, 70 miles above Alexandria, where rioting
also occurred, the casualties number 11 killed and 61 wounded. A message
filed March 13, said order had been restored and the rtoops are able to
cope with the situation.
Koreans Now Want Independence.
TOKIO, Monday.—(By Associated Press.)—The Korean demonstration
continued Saturday and Sunday, according to dispatches received here,
dication are that the national independence movement is nationally exten
sive and organized in some of the strongest provinces.
Japanese Premier Denies Financial Story.
TOKIO, Saturday.—(By Associated Press.)—Premier Hara today denied
that the visit to China of John J. Abbott, vice-president of the Con
In
rumors
tinental & Commercial Trust & Savings Bank of Chicago, was designed to
oust Japanese capitalists from China. The premier said the rumors to this
effect were untrue.
NEW EIRUND FAVORS
LEAGUE OF NOTIONS
; V
BOSTON HERALD TAKES A POST
CARD VOTE AND GETS SUR
PRISING RESULTS
The Boston Herald's post-card poll
of representative citizens of eastern
Massachusetts on the league orf na
tions shows a preponderance of senti
ment in favor of the idea. Some an
swers savor of political partsanship,
hut most do not. Judge Robert Grant,
stout conservative in politics, says:
"The draft of the proposed league of
nations may be loosely drawn and
may require some new phrasing, but
Sts framework is sound, %nd will, in
my opinion, win the support of a
vast majority of the people." Some
of the most spirited replies come from
business men. Theodore Jones, presi
dent of the well-known firm of
Jones, McDuffee & Stratton, who
a republican, declares
"squarely on the side of President
Wilson and Mr. Taft," and considers
the attitude of the obstructionist re
• publican senators as "very detriment
al to the welfare of this country," P.
. B. Magrane of the Magrane, Houston
company, writes: -
"Senators Lodge and Knox show
their minds steeled and wraped by
partisan politics to such an extent
V that the moans, tears, and starving
conditions of hundreds of millions of
human beings are as nothing, com
pared to the party advantage that
they might gain."
Some of the dissenters merely state
that they "side with Lodge and Knox,"
refusing to be explicit. Other critics
say that they favor the league of na
tions, but in the words of E. G. Pres
ton of the S. S. Pierce company, de
plore the "idea of being stampeded
into precipitate action," or else ask
himself
is
for clarification and improvement of
the present draft.
In Oregon, Too.
The Oregon Journal has been tak
ing a straw vote in the state on the
question of a league of nations. The
result of four days of voting showed
2226 for and 26 against. The favor
able votes, it is stated, came in thick
est on the day the round robin sena
tors made their protest.—Springfield
(Mass.) Republican.
m
IDAHO MAKES WAR
CAMPAIGN FOR POISONING SQUIR
RELS STARTS IN ALL FARM
ING DISTRICTS
BOISE.—Having succeeded in slay
ing large numbers of rabbits in the
winter months, farm bureaus through
out the state are making preparations
for a vigorous poisoning campaign
against.ground squirrels and other in
jurious rodents, according to an
.nouncement made at the university
extension department offices Friday,
day.
an
Statistics just received from Mont
pelier show that the Bear Lake coun
ty farm markets bureau has increased
in membership from 224 to 375 in
the past year. 1
expanded in the same manner.
"The bureaus generally have in
creased from 25 and 100 per cent In
the past year," said Ralph H. Musser,
assistant state county agent leader,
Friday. "We credit this expansion to
the strong program of work carried
in every county possessing a bu
Other bureaus have
OJl
reau."
F. Ll Williams, acting state county
agent leader, will be at Rupert Sat
urday to attend the annual meeting
of the Minidoka county farm bureau.
♦♦+♦++♦♦♦+♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
+ STRIKE RIOTERS STONE
POLICE IN LAWRENCE ♦
+
+


♦ LAWRENCE, Mass. —When ♦
+ the police were trying to break ♦
♦ up a parade of textile workers ♦
♦ today shots were fired 'from ♦
♦ tenement houses and officers +
+ were stoned. Persons in the +
+ crowd were clubbed. Many ar- ♦
+ rests were made. This is the +
+ most violent disturbance since ♦
+ the strike began six weeks ago. ♦
WOMAN SHOT IN ROW
NEAR ORANGEVILLE
TROUBLE STARTED AT A DANCE
RESULTS IN ONE SHOOTING
ANOTHER
ticipated.
GRANGEVILLE.—Vesta Nepean, a
young woman living with her parents
on Doumecq Plains, in the Salmon
river country, was shot and severely
wounded Saturday by Mrs. Newton
Otto, a neighbor. The shooting fol
lowed a quarrel in which Miss Ne
pean's brother and George Lynch, Mrs.
Otto's brother, are said to have par
The wound is not thought to be fa
tal, the bullet having entered the leg,
and unless bloqd poisoning should de
velop serious results are not expected.
Reports from the scene of the
shooting indicate that at a dance given
Friday night in the Nepean neighbor
hood the two men had an altercation
and Saturday as the Nepeans passed
the Otto ranch hostilities were re
newed, and while the two men were
fighting the women engaged in a dis
pute, leading to the shooting.
Sheriff Eller and Prosecuting At
torney Auger left immediately for the
scene of the trouble. The shooting
has aroused the entire community, due
to the nature of the case, and the
prominence of the persons involved.
JUSTICE ABOUT BEER
WANT BEER CONTAINING MORE
THAN ^ OF 1 PER CENT
ALCOHOL SOLD
The great "American issue" of
whether beer containing more than
% of 1 per cent alcohol can be sold,
is to be decided by the department of
justice. Steps to get a decision on the
momentus question.
NEW YORK.—Whether the internal
revenue bureau has authority to en
force the rule against the sale of beer
containing more than % of 1 per cent
of alcohol will be nut un to the de
partment of justice. Internal Revenue 1
Commissioner Hbper today decided to
ask for' an opinion on the subject.
Coincident with the internal revenue
bureau's decision to ask the depart
ment of justice whether it had author
ity to enforce the regulation prohibit
ing the production of beer over % of 1
per cent alcohol content, the defend
ants in the brewery stock holders suit
brought here last week to test the con
stitutionality of the war-time prohibi
tion act, announced they had invited
the government's cooperation In the
defense.
EMPLOYMENT BUREAU
HAS CALLS FOR HELP
The U. S. employment service has
calls for the following help;
Three house maids, three general
farm hands, two mechanical drafts
men, 1 grocery clerk, one office and
stock clerk.
It also has applications from sev
eral soldiers desiring work about
town. Persons desiring help of any
kind are urged to list their needs
with the service. Farmers are es
pecially urged to .list their coming
needs as indications are that there
will be a shortage of desirable farm
help...
Q
A Modest Request
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RED GROSS US
HOOVER TELLS OF NEEDS OF
SUFFFER1NG PEOPLE IN
EUROPEAN COUNTRIES
Herbert Hoover, head of the Europ
ean Relief Administration, cables that
the most serious need of millions of
men, women and children in northern
France, Italy, Czeeho-Slovakia, Bel
gium, Serbia, Roumania. Greece and
other allied countries in the near East
is that of clothing. In most places,
; the Huns absolutely ruined the tex
tile industries, making it impossible
for the people to help themselves,
even if they had raw materials, ac
cordingly they look to the outside
world, and principally to America for
assistance.
Colonel Harvey D. Gibson cables:
"Refugees have been for several years
in rags or with practically no clothes
at all. In many countries now, even
Jit clothing could be manufactured and
paid for, material is totally lacking.
The need is great to a degree that few
at home can possibly realize. Every
garment furnished will cover a body
which otherwise would lack proper
clothing, and each garment furnished
will actually prevent suffering."
Fifty American Red Cross investi
gators in France have submitted a re
port asserting that the need of cloth
ing among hundreds of thousands of
refugees in France alone is more im
perative even than food. The report
says : "Most of the refugee families
manage to nourish themselves on the
government allowance and
small wages, but they are by no means
able to clothe themselves."
their
PRESBYTERIANS
SEEK FUND OF $38,000,000—F. A.
DAVID IN CHARGE OF LOCAL
WORK
The Presbyterians are making a big
drive for funds to carry on their work
during the coming year. This is a
nation-wide movement in which all
Presbyterian churches are cooperat
ing. The campaign will culminate
next Sunday afternoon in a personal
canvas of all members and friends of
the church. Between the hours of
2 and 5 on that date it is proposed
to raise funds at the rate of $13,000,
000 an hour. This is the biggest pro
gram the church has ever undertaken.
The church is confronted with a great
opportunity for expansion—the great
est opportunity in her history. A great
war has been waged in defense of the
moral principles of righteousness and
justice and brotherhood. It is the
church's task to hold the gains that
have been made and conserve the
has
.
sp }f n , dl 'J idealism that the war
callea rortn -
Twenty-five million dollars of the
entire fund te be raised is for local
congregational expenses and $13,000.
000 for our world-wide work. This
includes $500,000 for returning sol
diers and sailors, and another $500,
000 for rebuilding the Protestant
churches of France. Belgium and
Italy. Four-fifths of the Protestant
churches which were destroyed in the
war area were of the Presbyterian or
der.
campaign. He will be assisted by a
central committee of five members:
J. G. Eldridge, H. H. Simpson, J. S.
Heckathorne. C. M. Jacobson, and
Wm. Hunter. In addition to these
men about 30 other men of the con
gregation will have part in the work
of the campaign. The money to be
raised locally will include the running
expense of the local Presbyterian
church and her apportionment of
funds for the world-wide work of the
church.
Barghoom's Entertain.
Mr. and Mrs. Sikko Barghoorn, of
Spokane, who lived in Moscow many
years, gave one of the most brilliant
entertainments of the season at their
Spokane home Monday night. The
affair was a St. Patrick's ball and
was attended by the elite of Spokane.
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
HAD LIVELY MEETING
There was a big attendance at the
noon luncheon of the chamber of com
merce today, despite the bad weather.
Many matters of interest and import
ance were discussed. C. J. Hugo,
representatives from Moscow, told of
the work done by the legislature. The
basket ball team of the University of
Idaho, was the guest of the chamber
at luncheon. A full report of the
meeting will be given tomorrow.
TWELVE MORE BILLS
IDAHO NOW HAS A DOZEN NEW
LAWS ADDED TO THE AL
READY LONG LIST
Governor Davis today
signed seven house and five senate
measures and vetoed one, house bill
No. 244, relating to the appointment
and duty of managers of irrigation
propects. None of the big appropri
ation measures was signed today.
They will be Tuesday morning.
House Bills Signed.
House bills signed are as follows:
No. 189, providing for the creation
and organization of highway districts
from a part of any district heretofore
or hereafter created.
No. 149, proposing amendment to
the state constitution authorizing
state board of equalization to meet
in special session.
No. 212, amending law relating to
the assessment of taxes.
No. 125, prescribing general powers
of municipal corporations of the state.
No. 265, providing for extension of
delinquent taxes on tax roll.
No. 144, providing for registration
and regulation of dogs.
No. 141, appropriating $3000 for
the construction of the Neil wagon
road.
BOISE,
Senate Bills Signed.
Senate bills were signed as follows:
No. 109, allowing life insurance
companies to deduct premiums re
funded to policy holders from the
amount on which their license tax
is computed.
No. 49, providing for cancellation
of contracts where excessive Carey
act water rights are sold.
No. 110, requiring that the certifi
cate of acknowledgment of an in
strument executed by a corporation
must be executed by president or sec
retary.
No. 143, authorizing counties or
cities of the first class or cities with
charters to acquire and own sites and
jointly construct public buildings
thereon.
No. 121, requiring the state treas
urer to post notices to pay outstand
ing warrants.
-1BI
LOOKS FOR 1RIRD
PARTI IR MO
PREDICTION MADE THAT THREE
PARTIES WILL BE IN FIELD
NEXT CAMPAIGN
A prominent Idaho visitor who has
been a close student of political af
fairs in the Gem state for many years,
the Portland Hotel,
an
is of the belief that the formation of
a third party in Idaho is not im
probable as the result of recent po
litical upheavals. *
"The nonpartisan league deliber
ately stole the Idaho democratic pri
maries last year," and procured the
nomination of H. F. Samuels for gov
ernor on the democratic ticket, in op
position to the regular democratic
candidate, in spite. of all the demo
cratic party could do. Samuels was
defeated, but he has recently been
selected by Secretary Wilson of the
department of labor to make a tour
of foreign countries and report on
labor conditions. This appointment, it
is painted out, could scarcely have
been* made without the sanction of
United States Senator John F. Nu
gent, active head of the real demo
cratic organization of Idaho, who has
the ear of the administration.
"Many in the democratic party
censure Senator Nugent for the ap
pointment of Samuels, which they ac
cept as an indication of Nugent's
compromise, or at least recognition
of the non-partisan league.
In the non-partisan camp a strong
element has sprung up in opposition
to the Samuels faction for his al
leged surrender to the democrats. As
a result of this split in both the dem
ocratic and non-partisan ranks, it
would not be surprising were a third
party developed before the 1920 cam
paign opens."—Portland Oregonian.
NO CLUE TO I. A. HAWLEY
CONTAINED IN LETTER
Mrs, Ira A. Hawley has had an
answer to the party who received the
letter with her husband's name on the
envelope. It was a letter that had
been written in Moscow and not de
livered in France since the soldier
had returned to America. The ad
dress of Ira A, Hawley had been
written on the envelope (because it
had been forgotten in the letter) by
the writer of the letter to inform
the one to whom it had b.'en written
of the address of Ira 'A. Hawley, so
he could assist in the search. The
letter was returned to the writer.
- -i^rrrw^m
IN EASTERN VIEW
OF MO AND RORAH
OUR STATE AND OUR SENIOR SEN
ATOR GET MUCH MENTION
IN EASTERN PAPER
Idaho and her senior senator ara
getting much free advertising in tha
press of the east. The last issue of
the weekly edition of the Springfield
(Mass.) Republican, one of the lead
ing newspapers of New England, re
publican in politics, contained four
items in which Idaho and Senator
Borah are the topic. They should be
read with interest by Idaho people,
for they give a fairly good view of
how our state and senior senator are
viewed, by one of the leading news
papers of the United States. They fol
low:
That Republican Memorial.
The vote of 42 to 16 by which tha
Idaho house. has adopted a memo
rial attacking President Wilson for
his "defiant and dictatorial attitude"
and condemning the present charter
for a league of nations suggests the
desire of Senator Borah's particular
little corner of the country to honor
him.
But will he be quite pleased?
Women to Trail Borah.
It has long been wondered why the
suffrage militants did not pester op
position United States senators as
they had the president. The federal
amendment found its one obstacle in
the senate, not in the house of rep
resentatives nor the White House.
The report that the militants are now
to trail Senator Borah over the coun
try, while he stumps against the
league of nations, indicates a new pol
icy. Mr. Borah is a pretty good mark
for militant antics because his state.
Idaho, has for many years been a
woman suffrage state. His stubborn
opposition to the federal amendment
has been a deep disappointment to the
suffrage leaders.
Our New Primary Law.
Not sufficiently noticed during last
week's sensations'has been Idaho's re
turn to the old convention, system of
making party nominations, Possibly
a political reaction has .started which
will spread far before it is stopped.
Conservative politicians in other
states are not likely to ignore what
has happened in Idaho after 10 years
of experience with the direct nomina
tion primary system. The Republican
is inclîned to anticipate a similar re
action here in the east for the rea
son that the direct nominations sys
tem can be worked to the best ad
vantage only with a short ballot, but
a short ballot, desirable as it is,
seems unattainable for the present, at
least, in this state and also -in New
York. Reaction means machine and
boss rule again, but reforms must be
made reasonably workable in order to
endure.
Hands Borah a Hot One.
In his New York speech Senator
Borah attacked the constitution of the
league of nations because countries
like Norway. Sweden and Denmark'
would each have as many delegates
as the United States, ignoring the
fact that the house of delegates under
the proposed constitution would not
be a body in which much power
would be vested. But the senator's
criticism becomes amusing when con
sidered in the light of the fact that he
represents Idaho in the United States
senate. Now Idaho, in 1918, had
about 461.000 inhabitants, or less than
the population of a fair-sized eastern
or middle western city. Isn't it an
outrage that New York or Pennsyl
fanla or Massachusetts has no more
voting power in the senate
Idaho? It is safe to say that the
United States suffers enormously more
from Idaho's equal representation m
the senate with Ohio than it possibly
could from the equal representation
of Denmark with this country in
the house of delegates in the league
of nations.
GOVERNMENT SELLS WHEAT
14 CENTS PREMIUM
MINNEAPOLIS.—Five million bu
shels of wheat were sold to Minneap
olis millers Saturday by the United
State Grain corporation in the move
to prevent an increase in the price of
flour and bread. The price average
reached $2.36 a bushel, 14 cents above
the fixed wheat price. There are more
than 25,000,000 bushels of government
owned wheat stored in Minneapolis
elevators.
Under the plan adopted the sale
which began today will continue until
further orders are received from
Washington.
INFLUENZA SITUATION
REPORTED BETTER TODAY
Dr. W. A. Adair, city health of
ficer, reports the situation better to
day, as six quarantine flags were
taken down and only two were put
up. One of these is at Cameron s
home, 364 E. B street, and one at
Parkinson's on' Asbury street. He
says the ban is still on against grade
and high school children attending
shows, dances and parties, including
class parties.
Farm Sales Prices High.
Good prices were obtained for stock
sold at the auction sale of John Peas
ley, south of town, Monday, when the
»total receipts of the sale reached
$1740. Two large horses sold for $160
and $170 each, two that were fft)t two
old brought $122.50 each,
sold for $176,
one
one
years
sorrel mare
brought as high as $74 and machinery
and other property »old well. Colonel
C. E. Walks was auctioneer.

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