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The daily star-mirror. (Moscow, Idaho) 1911-1939, March 18, 1919, Image 3

Image and text provided by Idaho State Historical Society

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4
Per Cent
Interest
paid on
Savings Accounts
and Interest Com
pounded
Every
THREE
MONTHS
—:AT: —
STATE BANK
AS YOUNG AS
YOUR KIDNEYS
The secret of youth is ELIMINA
TION OF POISONS from your body.
This done, you can live to be a hundred
®nd enjoy the good things of life with
as much "pep" as you did when in the
springtime of youth. Keep your body
in good condition, that's the secret.
Watch the kidneys. They filter and
purify the blood, all of which blood
passes through them once every three
minutes. Keep them clean and in
proper working condition and you have
nothing to fear. Drive the poisonous
wastes and deadly uric acid accumula
tions from your system. Take GOLD
MEDAL Haarlem Oil Capsules and you
will always be in go»d condition. You
will feel strong and vigorous, with
«eady nerves and elastic muscles.
GOLD MEDAL Haarlem Oil Capsules
are imported direct from the labora
tories at Haarlem, Holland.
They are a reliable remedy which
has been used by the sturdy Dutch for
over 200 years, and has helped them
to develop into one of the strongest
and hearthiest races of the world. Get
them from your druggist. Do not take
a substitute. In sealed packages—
three sizes.
N
PRESIDE AT MEET
EXPECT 3,000 TEACHERS TO
ATTEND CONVENTION AT
SPOKANE IN APRIL
SPOKANE, WASH.—Preparations
for entertaining some 3,000 teachers
of the four northwestern states at
the twenty-first annual convention of I
the luland Empire Teachers' associa
tion are being made by educational
and commercial interests of this city.
The convention, which, according to I
a*
Grape-Nuts
A Specialized Cereal food
Builder of Body & Brain
This well planned combination of
the best parts of wheat & barley
has a delightfully sweet & nut
like flavor.
But the chief reason why you
should use Grape-Nuts is for its
building" worth — its real value
as a constructor of body tissues
for young & old.
Easy to digest, requires no
sugar & there's no waste.
There's a Reason'/or Grape-Nuts
\
•t
•ij
s
S
i
JS
g
jjj
g
j*J
$
&
IJ
plans announced by James, A. Burke
of this city, the secretary, will be
reality 30 conventions in one, is to
held here on Wednesday, Thursday
and Friday, April 2, 3, and 4.
While the forenoon sessions
day will consist of general meetings
at which nationally prominent
cators will discuss questions of vital
interest to the teaching profession
in general, during the afternoon
attending teachers will divide them
selves into 29 secfions, at each
which questions having to do with
some particular department or branch
of educational work will be taken
Each of the 29 sections has its own
set of officers, and these will
chosen in the sectional meetings. Ex
hibitions of marquai training work
and physical education drills may
part of the progr^jn of those sec
tional meetings.
Aside from men at the head of
ucational institutions of the north
western states, the principal speakers
at this year's convention will be Dr.
George D. Strayer, professor of edu
cational administration in the teach
ers college, Columbia University,
president of the National Educational
association and chairman of the com
mission of the national emergency
education, and Dr. J. R. Jewell, dean
of the college of education at the Uni
versity of Arkansas. A prominent
place on the program also will be
taken by Miss Sarah E. Richardson,
assistant federal director of vocation
al education, Washington, D. C.
Dr. Stayer and Dr. Jewell are down
for three addresses each during the
i convention, and with Miss Richard
son are expected to speak at the an
nual banquet of the association, to be
held on. the evening of the opening
day which is to be followed by a dance
and reception given by the Spokane
Chamber of Commerce. A number
of past presidents of the organization
also expected to talk on that oc
are
cation.
This year,s sessions will be- presid
ed over by Miss Ethel E. Redfield,
state superintendent of instruction of
Idaho, the sepond woman to be elected
president, of the association in the
21 years of its hsitory. Among the
prominent educators of the north
west who will have places on the pro
gram of the general sessions of the
convention will be President Kerr of
Oregon Agricultural College; Dr. E.
O. Holland, president of Washington
State College; Dr. Edward C. Elliott,
chancellor of the University of Mon
tana, and Dr. E. H. Lindley, président
of the University of Idaho.
The annual meeting of the Wash
ington State Music Teachers asso
ciation will be held in conjunction
with the teachers convention in
the past the music teachers of the
state have held their session at a sep
arate time and place. Members of
the music teachers' association will
give a concert during the afternoon of
April 2, for the benefit of members
of the Inland Empire Teachers' asso
c-iation. On the afternoon of April 4,
SffiWï ffiTt
City, will make an address under the
auspices of the music teachers' asso
ciation.
Forgot What He Needed.
From the Republican, Mt. Gilliad,
Ohio; The editor had an interesting
experience some time ago, when a
young gentleman came to this office
and asked Tor a copy of the Morrow
County Republican. He scrutinized
it carefully when a copy was handed
him, and then said: "Now I know!"
"What is it you are looking for," we
inquired. "My wife sent me after a
bottle of Chamberlain's Cough Rem
edy, azid I forgot the name I went
to several stores and the clerks named
over everything in the line on the
shelf except 'Chamberlain's.' I'll try
again, and I'll never go home without
Chamberlain's Cough Remedy." The
Republican would suggest to the
in
be
proprietors of stores, that .they, -
théir clerks, and never let them
stitute. Customers lose faith in
where substituting is permitted,
say nothing of the injustice to makers
of good goods and the disappointment
of customers.
the
of
up,
be
be
in
MAJ. GEN. ARTHUR MURRAY
1
.
I
a


m
•/-y
( t
LllLiJ
Maj. Gen. Arthur Murray, retired,
will be clerk of the military affairs
committee of the next house, 'unless
the war department objects. Repre
sentative Julius Kahn, who will be
chairman of the committee, has an
nounced that he will have General
Murray appointed to the position.
losses in the war includes four battle
| ships, the Bouvet, Ruffren, Gaulois and
Danton; four armored cruisers, the
Bean Gambetta, Amiral Charner, Cle
] )er (lI1( j Dupetlt Thounrs; one fast
cruiser, the Chatenurenault; fourteen
destroyers, eight torpedo boats and
f ou) .(; een submarines. One of the siih
lnar i nes the Duri, was refloated by the
. . .
ew ' ny F x '™ s subsequently recov
ered. Minor ships sunk were five nux
diary cruisers, four gunboats, seventy
two submarine chasers, one sloop and
seven small craft.
The French loss totaled 110,000 tons,
a g a i n st 550,000 tons for England, 76,
()00 ,. ons fol . j t „ !v
,ta »*•* s "~
FRENCH NAVY LOST 134 SHIPS
Total of Tonnage, 110,000; Four Bat
tleships and Four Armored
Cruisers In List.
Paris.—A full list of French naval
d 17,500 tons for
50,000 YANKS GO TO SCHOOL
Hundreds of Former Instructor« Are
Chosen to Teach Soldiers of the
A. E. F. in France,
Paris.—Fifty thousand soldiers of
the American expeditionary forces
have enrolled ns students in the array
post schools In France, conducted tin
der the direction of the army educa
tional commission. Hundreds of for
mer college and academy professors
and instructors drawn from the va
rious branches of the A. E. F. have
been sent to teach in these schools.
The plan is to make these division
al schools continue in operation with
the division until it is returned home
and demobilized.
post
sub
to
VIENNESE MERRY
DESPITE DEFEAT
Mch.
They Know They Were Beaten,
Admit It, and Let It
Go at That.
SMART CARS ARE CROWDED
People Are Well Dressed, Cheerful,
and Pay Enormous Prices for
Chocolate and Cakes—Future
Left to the Politicians.
Vienna.—Perhaps the most striking
characteristic of Vienna Just now is
its citizens' Indifference. To enter the
crowded, smart, beautifully decorated
cafes and watch the lively, laughing
public there is to ask : "Do these
people realize that they have lost the
war and an empire, and are reduced
to being citizens of a poverty-stricken
spate of under 8,000,000, with an enor
mous war debt, a bankrupt exchequer
and an ever-growing army of unem
ployed 7"
If a foreigner visited this city's
cafes and restaurants without being
told that he was in a country that
had been engaged In a disastrous war
for over four years he would think
Its citizens sunned themselves in peace
ful prosperity. Laughter, careless talk
about the opera, the ballet and a
prominent actress' private life greet
you from ail sides; Not a word about
war or politics.
Officers in bright colored uniforms
with much gold lace and with rows of
decorations glittering on their tunics,
are as lively as the civilians, while
the well-gowned women In costly,
fashionable furs and jewelry, leave
nothing to those who enjoyed life hero
before the war. They are every whit
ns "chic." as gay and as up-to-date.
The Smartest Cafe.
Strange to relate, Vienna's smart
est, dearest and moat sought-after
cafe was opened during the war. The
Cafe Krantz Is the last word in lux
ury and attractiveness. Money has
been lavished on its decorations, and
Its music Is supplied by the orchestra
of the Volks fgiera. conducted by the
popular violinist and composer, Willy
Kleinberg. Here Idlers sip chocolate
made with wafer at 60 cents a small
cup, eat small cakes of whitest flour
et 70 cents each, flirt, chat and listen
to as good music as you can enjoy
anywhere in the world.
Each seat at one of the little round
tables costs 12 cents on ordinary days,
but on holidays, such as New Year's
eve. you cannot get Inside the place
under 60 cents, while the best seats,
which are in the gallery upstairs,
overlooking the high hall, where the
music is, and the main part of the
cafe, cost $T. Every sent is taken,
every occupant happy, careless and
absorbed merely In pleasure.
The same crowd Is to be seen at
Bucher's ten room, opened a year
ago, with brocade hung walls and dis
creet corners. Here, a cracker costs
50 cents and a cupful of chocolate 80
cents, while a portion of Imitation tea,
without sugar or milk, can be bad for
50 cents. Tke crowd here is as well
dressed, as cheerful and ns indiffer
ent to the Versailles conference as that
in the Cafe Krantz.
The Atlantis, another magnificent
enfe built during the war, is on the
ground floor of a hotel, unopened
only because Vienna cannot find fur
niture for it. At least It was till a
couple of days ago, when the Italian
military commission arrived here,
General Segre in command, and
opened offices on the first floor. The
Italian flag hangs from the balcony,
over the heads of the cafe habitues,
but nobody mentions It, or the war
and Its disasters.
"Is This What We Fought For?"
Now and again some battered look
ing officer in shabby uniform can be
seen scowling on the thought
less crowd with a look that says: "Is
this what we fought for?" But such
are few and far between. The ma
jority of the military people take re
cent events like the civilians. A Vien
nese explained It to me:
"They are so happy the war Is
over."
It matters not what comes next :
the problems of the future are left
The war
to
piofessionai politicians,
over, the cafes are attractive, the
1
opera Is open,
which matter,
people say:
bolshevism, for people are too careless
to want It."
This attitude is not the boastful
one of the Germans, who tell the uni
verse they are not beaten. The Aus
trian knows he is beaten and says so.
But so long as bis pocketbook is stuffed
with paper money he keeps smiling
and goes to the restaurant and cafe
his choice to look at the pretty
women and talk about the ballet Noth
ing else Is worth notice.
These are the things
No wonder you hear
'TlJere is no fear of
BcntinckV Cook
Kaiser's Double &
»!
s
»1
Amsterdam.—Count Bentinck, .♦<
host to Wlllläm Hohenzollern,
has a cook who Is a dead ringer £<
He is fre
m
for the ex-kaiser,
quently pointed out to strangers ij
as the former German ruler, and
when observed carries out the
part with rare dignity and ma- lg
Jesty of pose.
►14
HAMMOND IDEA IS O.K,
Crewless Ship Proves to Be
Success.
a
Army and Navy Experts Report That
Wireless Control Is
Possible.
Washington.—Army and navy ex
perts have reported (he device of John
Hays Hammond, .Ir„ for radio control
of surface craft to be sent laden with
explosives against enemy ships a suc
cess, and predict similar results with
.submerged craft showing above water
only wireless antennae.
Results of tests were mn.de public
in connection with the new fortifica
tions appropriation hill, which carrier
$475,000 for construction of an exper
imental submerged boat.
Secretary Baker wrote the housi
appropriations committee, which is
considering t lit? bill, that the joint
army and navy hoard was "convinceo
of the practicability of (lie control" o
tiie surface craft, and added that then
had also been demonstrations of tie
possibility of the control of a
completely submerged except for an
air intake pipe.
Before finally deciding on the pur
chase of the patents for $750,000 tin
hoard desires further experiment will
the submerged craft.
Construction of the submerged
craft, which will he about 80 fee;
long by 7 feet in diameter, will take
two years, according to Mr. Hammond,
who told the committee he has spen'
ten years and $400,000 on his inven
tion.
crafi
"There is no question whatever as
to the ability to control with great
accuracy the torpedo or carrier," said
a letter of Maj. Gen. F. W. Coe, a
member of the board, "so long ns It Is
a surface vessel of has any antennae
above the water, by direct radio
waves, either from shore or from an
airplane."
With a shore staiion having a height
of 80 feet above sea level radio con
trol of the craft has been demonstrat
ed to the board up to a distance of
seven miles, but General Coe said that
if controlled from an airplane there
was no limit as to distance .except the
propelling power of the torpedo or the
boat that carried it or the airplane.
-
Latah County Records.
Rel.—Martin V. Thomas to Thomas
H. Sturdevant, r-m 3-20-14.
Thomas H. Sturdémant to Martin V,
Thomas, $1000, Lots 13-14 28 Park
Add. Moscow (W. D. 3-5-19.)
Relocated mining claim; I. D. Arra
smith.
Located Mining Claim— G. U. Arra
smlth.
Placer Location—W. B. •Arrasmith,
Hoodoo district.
Army Discharge—Henry Lewis Tor
sen.
W. D.—Gertrude E. Town to Charles
N. Jester, .$] ; Lots 1-2 2 Frye's Add.
Moscow._
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Satisfaction for tfte
sweet tooth.
Aid to appetite and
digestion — benefit
and enjoyment in
LASTING form.
And only 5 cents
a package.
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^CHEWSNG GUMT
IN
The
107
Valdez is An Orderly Town.
VALDEZ, Alaska.—Valdez is be
lieved tp hold the record for orderli
ness among Alaska towns in view of
.he fact that not one arrest has been
made for any couse during the past
seven months. U. S. Marshall Bren
neman says he cannot recall even one
case of near-arrest.
p
Bad Taste in Your Mouth.
When you have a bad taste in your
mouth you may know that your di
gestion is faulty. A dose of Chamber
lain's Tablets will usually correct the
disorder. They also cause a gentle
movement of the bowels. You will
find this to be one of the bests medi
cines you have ever become acquaint
ed with. _ Mch.
Coming to
PALOUSE
DOCTOR
MELLENTHIN & CO.
SPECIALISTS
DO NOT USE SURGERY
Will be at
Martin Hotel
Monday, March 24
Office Hours 11 a. m., to 3 p. m.
ONE DAY ONLY
NO CHARGE FOR EXAMINATION
The doctor in charge, on account
of having been in the LTnited States
army service, has not been able to
visit the different cities for the past
seven months, but from now on will
again make his regular calls,
a graduate in medicine and surgery,
and is licensed by the Äate of Wash
ington. He visits professionally the
more important towns and cities and
offers to all who cal! on this trip,
consultation and examination free,
except the expense of treatment when
desired.
According to his method of treat
ment he does not operate for chronic
appendicitis, gall stones, ulcers of
stomach, tonsils or adenoids.
He has to his credit many wonder
ful results in diseases of the stomach,
liver, bowels, blood, skin, nerves,
heaert, kidneys, bladder, bedwetting,
catarrh, weak lungs, rheumatism,
sciatica, leg ulcers and rectal ail
ments.
If you have been ailing for any
length of time and do not get any
better, do not fail to call,
projrer measures rather than disease
are often the cause of your long
standing trouble.
Remember above date, that exam
ination on this trip will be free, and
that his treatment is different.
Address: 336 Boston Block, Min
neapolis, Minn.
He is
as im-

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